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Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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65
votes
8answers
17k views

Why do native speakers say 'Come on in' rather than 'Come in'?

Today I passed by a restaurant and got attracted to its menu sticking on the window, so I stopped and had a look at it. Then a staff standing at the gate said to me,'We have nice food. Come on in!' I ...
56
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5answers
230k views

“firstly … secondly …” or “first … second … ”?

Suppose I am enumerating reasons not to fly. Is it then correct to write/say: Firstly, I prefer the train because I can see the landscape. Secondly, I have control over my luggage, and thirdly, it ...
43
votes
5answers
11k views

Using 'very' to emphasize a 'noun' where emphasizing is NOT possible!

Quite clear to me is the use of very before an adjective. It emphasizes. But then, when very is used before a noun, it confuses me. Furthermore, if it's before the noun which is not definable in ...
43
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6answers
37k views

'Ask away' - what does 'away' mean?

“Sir,” said Harry, reminding himself irresistibly of Voldemort, “I wanted to ask you something.” “Ask away, then, my dear boy, ask away. . . .” In this sentence, I don't know what does 'away' ...
37
votes
3answers
6k views

Why did my “seldom” get corrected?

In an answer in the Spanish site about the use of timbre in European Spanish I tried to say that there is a specific meaning of the word that I know but very infrequently get to use, so I wrote this: ...
28
votes
7answers
11k views

“I’m too tired to drive”: Why does removing 'too' make this sentence ungrammatical?

This is grammatical: I'm too tired to drive. but this isn't: I'm tired to drive. Why? How can removing an adverb make a sentence ungrammatical? In a sentence like “He slowly walked down the ...
25
votes
2answers
834 views

Does “It snowed hard Monday” require an “on”?

I came across an English learner writing It snowed hard Monday. After saying that it didn't snow on Friday and Saturday. It didn't quite feel right to me. I'd be okay with It snowed hard. or ...
24
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4answers
19k views

what is the difference between “yet” and “still”?

what is the difference between "yet" and "still"? When we can use "still"? and when we can use "yet"? Are they synonyms or not? "The plan could yet succeed." Can I use "still" in that sentence ...
22
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4answers
4k views

Why has “strangely” been used instead of “strange” in the sentence “Harry felt strangely”?

Isn't "feel" a linking verb here? If so, shouldn't "strange" be used in lieu of "strangely"? A tinkling bell rang somewhere in the depths of the shop as they stepped inside. It was a tiny place, ...
20
votes
2answers
18k views

“Pretty” versus “quite” [duplicate]

Is there any difference between using pretty, and quite, in the following sentences? I am pretty good at playing soccer. I am quite good at playing soccer. How are you? I am quite well. ...
17
votes
6answers
161k views

How do I use “also” in a sentence?

Which of the following sentences are grammatically correct in written text? You also are allowed to see your son. You are also allowed to see your son. Also, you are allowed to see your son. ...
16
votes
4answers
7k views

Should I say “There are (a) very few animals there” with an article or not?

When I'm saying the sentence "There are (a) very few animals there" should I add it an article (after the word "are") or not?
16
votes
3answers
5k views

Are words ending in -ly adverbs?

Adverbs often end in -ly. But the word friendly is not an adverb, is it? A friendly advice is incorrect, but a friendly person is correct. Is the word friendly very unusual or are there many non-...
15
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8answers
4k views

Introductory word meaning “considering what was previously said”

Is there an introductory word or phrase which means considering what was said? German-made parts are way too expensive. Taking it into consideration, we ordered Chinese ones.
13
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3answers
111k views

When to begin a sentence with “Therefore”

I know we can begin a sentence with Therefore. We can also use it after commas in a sentence. For example, which is correct? She had previous experience, therefore she seemed the best candidate. She ...
12
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7answers
1k views

“waterway … flowed sombre” - Should Joseph Conrad have used an adverb, not an adjective?

SPOILER ALERT: This question asks about the last line of Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad. If you are reading the novel, you may want to skip this question. Should an adverb (i.e. sombrely) have ...
12
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3answers
1k views

Has GOOD become an acceptable adverb?

I'm a native English speaker. On a site where I help Russians with English, one of them wrote the sentence: My watch has been working good since I fixed it. Naturally, I pointed out that the ...
11
votes
3answers
5k views

“I only teach you” vs. “I teach only you” vs. “I teach you only”

I only teach you. I teach only you. I teach you only. I think that all the sentences have same meaning, but my teacher says that they are different from each other. I think that the ...
11
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1answer
33k views

“as such” or “therefore”

Additional calculations suggest that teacher effects on college going and wages may be as much as three times larger than that predicted based on test scores alone. As such, more than half of teachers ...
10
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8answers
2k views

Which word does the adverb 'usually' modify in 'In stories the witch is usually a homely woman'?

In the sentence In stories the witch is usually a homely woman which word does the adverb usually modify?
10
votes
2answers
465 views

Under what circumstances does an adverb not get -ly?

I learned in school that it's correct to say really good. On the internet I've also seen real good. Is this grammatically incorrect, or are there particular circumstances under which this is correct? ...
9
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3answers
5k views

How should I understand this line from Pulp Fiction?

Butch: You okay? Marsellus: Naw man. I'm pretty fuckin' far from okay! This is dialogue from the movie Pulp Fiction. What kind of the word class is "fuckin'" in the sentence: Participium or ...
9
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5answers
6k views

Is “I never saw him yesterday” grammatical?

Is "I never saw him yesterday" grammatical, used to mean that "at no point in time in yesterday did I see him"? Does the sentence sound weird to a native speaker of AmE?
9
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3answers
8k views

Created equal or created equally?

The United States Declaration of Independence contains one of the most well known and enduring lines in English: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they ...
9
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5answers
19k views

How can I figure out whether a word is an adverb or an adjective?

How can we confirm the word modifying an adjective is an adverb which may well be adjective sometimes? In this sentence, what are the parts of speech of 'bright' and 'red'? She wore a bright red ...
8
votes
3answers
6k views

“Most everyone” versus “mostly everyone”?

Saying "most everyone" is much more popular in books than "mostly everyone". To compute the distance between two coordinates most everyone/mostly everyone uses the Spherical Law of Cosines equation....
8
votes
4answers
9k views

Why is 'where' an adverb and not a pronoun?

A: Where are you going? B: I am going to school. Where took the place of school and something that takes the place of a noun is a pronoun. So, why isn't where a pronoun?
8
votes
3answers
659 views

Is “further” really used as synonym of “farther”?

The OALD, for the meaning of further says: (comparative of far) (especially BrE) at or to a greater distance SYN farther Is further really used as synonym of farther? As far as I recall, there is ...
8
votes
1answer
12k views

Totally, Completely, Fully or Entirely?

I'd like to know which is which! I don't know if I can use them correspondingly or not. Is there any rule or I have to remember expressions? You are totally/completely/entirely/fully correct. I ...
7
votes
4answers
18k views

I have never been here or I have never been there, which is more natural?

A friend of mine invited me to visit her. She was afraid that I would get lost, so she said she would be waiting for me at the bus station. When we finally met at the bus station, I said, "Sorry ...
7
votes
2answers
5k views

“laugh out loud” VS “laugh out loudly”

She almost laughed out loud at herself, thinking she could trust her instincts about people. "laugh out loud" VS "laugh out loudly", which is correct? I looked up they are all adv.
7
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4answers
3k views

Is “deep” an adverb in “They dug the well deep.” or something else?

They dug the well deep. What is "deep" in that sentence? I think its adverb but I stood wrong, help me someone!
7
votes
2answers
554 views

Possible ambiguities when using “home” as an adverb? (study home, write home…)

I'm aware of the adverbialization of the word "home" in English. I go home. I read letters at home/home. But in what kind of sentences could we find that home and at home can't be interchangeable? (...
7
votes
3answers
3k views

Usage of 'quick' as adverb

I heard the following dialog in a British English movie: Words go round quick. All the little tongues go clack, clack, clack. What does this mean, and why was the word "quick" used instead of "...
7
votes
5answers
10k views

“nearby” (close by) as an adjective, a preposition, or an adverb

Would you show me if there could be any potential difference semantically between the two? Please, would you possibly take into account the bounds of possibility that the word "nearby" in the ...
7
votes
2answers
6k views

The night before last night?

I could say "I am leaving the day after tomorrow," but what if I want to reference the night before last night? Do I say, "I left the night before last night"? What do native speakers say both ...
7
votes
2answers
4k views

When does “though” act as an adverb?

As I know, the word "though" doesn't need a comma before it (at the end of a sentence) if it's an adverb. How do I know if "though" is acting as an adverb? A few examples would be good! I've looked ...
7
votes
5answers
4k views

Can an adverb follow “to be”?

Consider these examples: They are everywhere. There is food everywhere. I used sentences like these a lot but lately I realize that everywhere is an adverb. What about those grammar rules that ...
7
votes
1answer
9k views

“I don't always” vs. “I always don't”

Is there any difference between these two sentences? I don't always get up early. I always don't get up early. I know it's one of the silliest questions ever, but, to my shame, I wasn't able to ...
7
votes
1answer
160 views

What's the adverb for Half-Assed?

What's the adverb for the word half-assed? I thought it was Half-assedly but it seems like it might not be a real word...
7
votes
7answers
1k views

Use of “up” in “back up”, to mean going in reverse

Why do we use the term "back up" when we are going in reverse? This is sometimes confusing for young English Language learners. Going backwards is understandable, where does the word "up" fit in? Are ...
7
votes
8answers
1k views

Why are both “when” and “once” used in “… when it was once broken”?

Transporting the stone when it was once broken was comparatively simple. This sentence is by the English author George Orwell from the world-famous book Animal Farm. I am wondering the reason why the ...
6
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1answer
2k views

What does the “more” mean here?

What does the "more" mean in the following sentence: HTTP is used to transport more the HTML, HTML from the browser to render the view. The picture source:
6
votes
3answers
823 views

The movement's ideas are not merely absurd; they are __________ dangerous

Which option fits best in the following question? The movement's ideas are not merely absurd; they are __________ dangerous. a. formally b. perfectly c. absolutely d. positively Some of ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Is 'If I die young' grammatical?

Is it a strictly grammatical clause, or an idiomatic but ungrammatical short for 'If I die when I am young'? If it is grammatical, is 'young' used as adverb, or 'die' used as copula, or a valid case ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “You gonna slice them up real nice” right?

From Friends(S02E14): You gonna slice them up real nice? (referring to cut up tomatoes) Is it grammatically right to use the word nice? Should it be an adverb? Such as: You gonna slice them up ...
6
votes
4answers
10k views

“Stay home” or “stay at home” – which is correct and why? [duplicate]

Stay home. Stay at home. When "home" functions as an adverb, it can modify the verb "stay". There are other examples, such as "go home",but there is no expression: Go to home. So I wonder ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Can we say “Let's have a beer meanwhile they play tennis”?

I am a bit confused on how to use "meanwhile". I know you can use it as a connector. Meanwhile, I did not notice I see dictionary.com says: noun meantime. adverb in the ...
6
votes
3answers
119k views

Where is the correct place to place adverbs in sentences?

I am always confused about where to put adverbs in sentences. For example, consider the questions below: Why did they target us specifically? Why did they target specifically us? Why did ...
6
votes
3answers
10k views

Is “deep” an adjective or adverb?

She worked quickly but without hurry. She put an old apron to cover her clothes. In the basement she found a jelly jar with a top and carried it out to the carriage house where the tools were kept. In ...