Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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An economical problem or an economic problem?

The confusion occurred as both are adjectives. Months back, one of the native speakers here corrected me when I said... I asked about the economical economic problems of the nation. I think it's ...
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More easily or most easily

I know when to use an adjective as comparative or superlative. Example - This is an easy job. This is easier than the previous one. This is the easiest. And when this way, we can't ...
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1answer
286 views

Adverb position

English is most widely used around the world A Canadian teacher told me that the standard English usage is like this. But I once talked with an American that used this sentence: English is a ...
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851 views

Position of adverbs in a sentence with modals + present perfect

This is how I would position the adverbs in the following sentences: Jan can't ever have seen a mobile phone before. Arnie must have undoubtedly been treated badly. If my word order is correct,...
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576 views

Which “nor” is right? inversion or not?

Most problem children neither like school nor do they feel comfortable there. Most problem children neither like school nor feel comfortable there. Would you please tell me which one is correct?
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1answer
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Using adverbs “generally” or “in general”

Is there any difference between Additionally, and In addition, at the beginning of the sentence? The same question for Generally, and In general,. Some that using ly at the beginning is very formal ...
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2answers
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Would you tell me more about “however” vs. “still” vs. “nevertheless” [closed]

In this example, is there any difference between these two words? Which one should be used, and why? I enjoyed the trip very much; however, my roommate did not. I enjoyed the trip very much; ...
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Placement of “either” (and the verbs that follow)

Are these right? Can the word either be put in either place? David will either write or have written. David either will write or have written. ...... What about when mixing a gerund and a ...
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2answers
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What kinda construction 'everything else fails' is?

We all have used it several times... When everything else fails try/do [something] While going through the definitions, I came across this - else - In addition; besides But then, if we go by ...
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1answer
117 views

Is there any difference between “[Only/All/All] that I need is”?

Is there any difference between: Only I need is All I need is All That I need is I noticed that this phrase is used with nouns after "is", can I use this phrase with verbs? for example: Only I ...
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2answers
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Would you tell me if I have used EMPHATIC ADVERB correctly?

Do you have your driving licence with yourself? Do you have your driving licence with you? Would you tell me which one is right? Thanks in advanced
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Do you know any other adverb like this? [duplicate]

Be assured, you are in numerous company... My professor already has said to me that BE ASSURED is an adverb here. Do you know any other example like that in such situation?
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Would you tell me what BUT means here?

Would you tell me what BUT means here? I think it means BUT FOR, or OTHER THAN. I have no choice but to listen to the doctor.
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207 views

Would you please tell me whether they are the same or not?

Would you tell me if the followings are the same? Bob didn't know how to swim. However, she jumped into the pool. Bob didn't know how to swim. Yet she jumped into the pool.
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Using the adverb “not”

The night was so quiet that not a sound could be heard. Would you possibly tell me if the following, which I have just written, is correct or not? And could you tell me in what topic of grammar I can ...
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Would you tell me how to equal the sentences, using BY THE TIME AND WHEN

By the time the first snowflake fell, Mario had made a warm fire and was enjoying the view. When Mario made a warm fire and was enjoying the view, the first snowflake fell. Would you tell me if ...
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Is it fine to say “completely” to lay stress on relativity of something

Please note the wording bellow. It seems completely relatively great but actually its final impact is not that great. Or Relatively speaking, It completely seems great but actually its final ...
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3answers
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Any possible adj of encourage?

I would like to know an proper equivalent adjective of the verb called 'encourage' For example: I am talking with my friend about a topic as follows: Me: This topic makes me encourage for ...
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“Strong enough” or “enough strong”?

She is enough strong. She is strong enough. Would you explain your explanations in detail? I am confused.
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1answer
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what is the difference between these? or in which way these has been used?

...because the floors and roof have strong enough beams to span. ...because the floors and roof have enough strong beams to span. ...because the floors and roof have strong beams enough to span. ...
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1answer
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What part of speech is NEAR here?

The lake was near bursting point as it had been raining heavily for weeks. What part of speech is NEAR here? and WHY?
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For ever and forever

What is the difference between the meaning and usage of for ever and forever in British English? From what I could gather from my online research, forever means : (also for ever) for all ...
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1answer
141 views

Would you possibly tell me which one you apply?

Would you possibly tell me which one you apply? I do not want a pen, but a bag. I want not a pen, but a bag.
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1answer
14k views

Word order: “10 minutes more” or “10 more minutes”?

I'm still packing my clothes. I'll need 10 minutes more. I'm still packing my clothes. I'll need 10 more minutes. Are both grammatically correct?
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3answers
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“I would so much like to thank you” or “I would like to thank you so much”?

Are both of these sentences acceptable? I would so much like to thank you. I would like to thank you so much. If both are acceptable then which one is more formal? And what part of speech is ...
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Are words ending in -ly adverbs?

Adverbs often end in -ly. But the word friendly is not an adverb, is it? A friendly advice is incorrect, but a friendly person is correct. Is the word friendly very unusual or are there many non-...
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1answer
669 views

Which part of the sentence does “still” and “almost” modify? How to judge them?

She was still beautiful at the age of forty. Does the adverb "still" modify "was" or "beautiful" ? And why? The effect is almost impossible to describe. Does the adverb "almost" modify "is" or "...
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Placement of “easily” (adverb of manner)

A college student asks his girlfriend to help him working on his homework; then the girlfriend will naturally answer: You can get it done easily. Why ask for help? or: You should easily get it ...
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“well” to express a possibility

I would like to know if both of the following are correct, especially if the 2 is correct. We are talking about the possibility that that task may be assigned to me That task could be very well ...
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1answer
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Are these predicative complements or adverbials?

As Harry helped himself to a treacle tart, the talk turned to their families. "I'm half-and-half," said Seamus. "Me dad's a Muggle. Mom didn't tell him she was a witch 'til after they were ...
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Up to what level the adverbs 'firstly', 'secondly', 'thirdly' and so on is acceptable?

This question is different from the one that's already asked here. I'm asking about the levels here. About research: Trust me...the Internet gave me up to nineteenthly and to be frank, I then ...
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How do I find the adverbs in my writing? [closed]

I have to find adverbs in my writing and other students' writing, but I get confused about how to accurately identify just what is the adverb. I have capitalized a piece of writing to show what I ...
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“It won't take but a moment”

I open the door. "Marlena!" I say, swinging the door farther open than I intend to. "What are you doing up? I mean, are you okay? Do you want to sit down?" "No," she says. Her face is ...
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“What do you care?”

  "I'm leaving anyway."   "What the hell are you talking about?"   I can't answer. I can't tell him that not only have I disgraced myself beyond belief or ...
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How to use “what is more”?

Just curious if "what is more" is basically the same as "furthermore". It seems to be an expression that creates emphasis, right? How about the following sentence: I am a great admirer of her films;...
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366 views

'… has been injured for about a week now' vs. '… was injured for about a week now'

Kitty: 'Jair, my middle finger has been injured for about a week now'. (1) Kitty: 'Jair, my middle finger was injured for about a week now'. (2) Could now be ungrammatical in (2)? Or, otherwise, ...
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“Incredulous” as an adverb

The below quote is an example that Longman has provided to illustrate the usage of the adjective "incredulous". I believe in this example, "incredulous" in used as an adverb. Please help me understand ...
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However, in spite of

Is it appropriate if I form a sentence by using two of these conjunctive adverbs like in the following sentence? However, in spite of her attitude, he did well. Is however quite redundant?
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Adjective or Adverb: unconsciously vs unconscious

Position of Adjectives: An adjective nearly always appears immediately before the noun or noun phrase that they modify. The source is here. But if you look at the following sentence, the adjective "...
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'like anything' as an intensifier

I have seen a person using 'like anything' as intensifier. Freedictionary website gave these example of 'like anything':- He ran like anything. (intensifier; usually euphemistic) We worked like ...
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1answer
915 views

Difference between 'good' and 'well'

What can I say instead of "I'm very tired, I guess I'm sick"? I don't feel good. I don't feel well. I feel bad. I'm not good. I'm not well.
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Adverb vs. adjective

I am not sure which sentence is correct. In general the weights could be arbitrary chosen, but one special case is obtained by using exponential weights. In general the weights could be ...
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1answer
755 views

“Normal distributed” or “normally distributed”

I am not sure if I should use an adjective or an adverb in the following sentences. The returns are normal distributed. The returns are normally distributed. Also see this example: ...
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how can we use “literally”? [closed]

What does literally exactly mean? I am not so clear about its meaning, and I often get confused.
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Which fits better “more important” or “more importantly”? [duplicate]

Sorry - I always think the question is obvious when plainly it is not. Should I use "important" or "importantly" in the introductory phase of this sentence: "Appellant's argument is premature. ...
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1answer
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Is “scarcely” an intensifier?

That was the country he liked best, over there; those sandhills dwindling away into darkness. One could walk all day without meeting a soul. There was not a house scarcely, not a single village for ...
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I have done that before vs I have done that

Is there a difference between "I have done that before" and "I have done that"? I'm not sure if these sentences make sense: A: "Have you ever done this before?" B: "Yes, I have done that ...
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What does “much” add to the meaning of “How 'much' common were these crimes?”

The dictionary I consulted says that how much is used for asking or saying what the amount of something is: (1) How much common were these crimes? (2) How common were these crimes? But, after ...
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Significance of 'only' in this sentence

I read this sentence somewhere: SpongeBob SquarePants became famous only in 2000's. Is this equivalent to "SpongeBob SquarePants became famous in 2000's", or does it mean that the SpongeBob ...
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“I'm not able to make it fly high”

I'm not able to make it fly high. If I change not able to unable, will it retain the same meaning? When should I use not able and when unable? Is the phrase fly high correct? Suppose I'm trying to ...