Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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1answer
44 views

Is it natural to use the word “cheaper” as an adverb?

Is it natural and correct to use the word cheaper as an adverb. For example: You have to pay a lot of money to have your phone fixed at the repair shop. I will do it cheaper.
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1answer
4k views

“Will” vs “Maybe I will” and “I think I will”

Almost every English grammar book I`ve studied claims that "Will" is used to talk about plans decided at the moment of speaking. Sentences like "I will help you" or "I'll wait for you" give a strong ...
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149 views

Usage of ''as'' before adjective

Can I use "as" to make adjective into adverb like examples below: 1) I always think as different from other people. 2) I always think differently from other people. Are both sentences have same ...
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26 views

Should the following sentence use “not surprising” or “not surprisingly”?

He hadn't arrived yet. Not surprising/surprisingly. It was too early. I think it can go both ways? Maybe the sentence could mean: Not surprisingly, he hadn't arrived yet. Or: He hadn't ...
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15 views

Trying to undertand if a noun an be an adverb given the struture of a sentence

I'm trying to teach my 7 year old daughter English and am clearly failing given I'm asking a question here. The following sentence has me a little baffled in regards to the noun, verb and adverb. ...
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93 views

Why, speaking of a colonoscopy, does it say “they put it UP your bottom”?

This is a piece of dialogue about a colonoscopy from the series "Outnumbered" s03e03: — Yes, but how does it get inside your insides? — Well, they put it up your bottom.
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63 views

Real good time or really good time

Which one of the following two sentences is correct? They have had a real good time. They have had a really good time. I think both of them are correct because real can also be used as ...
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55 views

what is the role of “more” here?

1- It more than doubles during these day rather one year ago. 2- they have reached 50 or more doubles in a season. Are they adverb?
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270k views

“firstly … secondly …” or “first … second … ”?

Suppose I am enumerating reasons not to fly. Is it then correct to write/say: Firstly, I prefer the train because I can see the landscape. Secondly, I have control over my luggage, and thirdly, it ...
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206 views

On a strictly cash basis

Can anyone explain why we say on a strictly cash basis (and not strict)? Is cash here an adjective? Is cash basis a noun phrase or compound noun?
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2answers
3k views

“For at least” vs. “at least for” ?

What do you prefer, or which one is more acceptable; putting the adverbs or phrases before the preposition, or after. He has been jailed at least/nearly for 5 years. He has been jailed for at ...
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18 views

“as mentioned earlier” or “as mentioning earlier”

I have recently been reading reducing adverb clauses to adverb phrases, and I was wondering why we cannot reduce "As I mentioned earlier..." to "As mentioning earlier...".
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56 views

What is 'always' modifying?

There's always somebody at home in the evenings. We're not always this busy! Ellie always was very good at art. I think it is modifying 'is, are, was'. Can't I think 'is, are, was' mean '...
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21 views

Any comparative adverbs here?

I have much more inspiration, and the editing would be easier. Is "the editing" a gerund? If so, is "easier" being used as a comparative adjective?
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20 views

'We cheer each other on before I depart.' - What does 'on' mean?

Dear native English speaker. I'm not a native-speaker; sometimes prepositions (or adverbs) are tricky for non-native speakers. 'We cheer each other on before I depart.' https://www.youtube.com/watch?...
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2answers
38 views

Does “A but is B” mean that B is not A, or how to interpret “but is” in such a sentence (A and B can be any phrase)?

Chicago Manual of Style, paragraph 5.92 has a sentence that starts with the following: "For instance, pregnancy lasts nine months but is a nine‐month pregnancy, . . .", which is then followed by ...
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143 views

“surely” vs. “really"

This really looks bad. vs. This surely looks bad. What is the difference between the adverbs surely and really? Don’t they both lay emphasis on certainity? Also: You surely do know how ...
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1answer
456 views

“as great as has”

Which sentence is more correct and why? Einstein is as great a scientest as HAS ever lived. Or, Einstein is as great a scientist as ever lived.
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3answers
152 views

Does “not” modify main verb or adverb?

I was trying to understand why can't we say I have not money, and the answer was that have doesn't mean possession here, it is an auxiliary verb(AV) to make a perfect tense, which requires main verb --...
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7k views

The night before last night?

I could say "I am leaving the day after tomorrow," but what if I want to reference the night before last night? Do I say, "I left the night before last night"? What do native speakers say both ...
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2answers
51 views

Is “not” a conjunction in “I want Joe, not him”?

I have been studying the word not lately and noticed it is not a conjunction just by itself and it is actually an adverb. Now, when we use following types of sentences, what is not's grammatical ...
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1answer
20 views

meaning: do something together

Does the following sentence make sense? This doesn't seem be a grammar question. Neither John nor I am having dinner together. I'd appreciate your help.
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“Learn something fast” or “learn something quickly”?

Tell me please if the following sentences mean the same. If you want to learn a language fast, you have to immerse yourself into the language. If you want to learn a language quickly, you have ...
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476 views

Is it natural to say “pass exams well”?

Would a native English speake ever say or ask the following? I have passed my all exams well. Did you pass your exams well? What I mean by pass exams well is pass exams successfully.
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50 views

Which sentence is “however” contrasting in this context?

Now research shows the night is getting even brighter. From 2012 to 2016 the earth's artificially lit area expanded by an estimated 2.2 percent a year (map), according to a study published last ...
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“I like swimming breaststroke” or “I like swimming the breaststroke”?

Tell me please if I need to use the before the types of swimming techniques when they are used as adverbs? For example: I like swimming (the) breaststroke. I prefer to swim (the) front crawl ...
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1answer
200 views

Order of adverb “immediately” in a phrase

I've been struggling with this aspect of the English language and i don't know if there are some rules to it that can help me. I've looked for answers on the internet but so far i haven't found ...
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2answers
99 views

He lives as he wants

Which is correct? He lives as he wants He lives how he wants
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The use of “stand” or “stand up” in context

Tell me plese if the use of up is optional in the following context. I have been standing (up) in line for three hours. In one of English textbooks they use up, but what does it add to the meaning?...
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1answer
54 views

“Since” vs “since then” at the end of a sentence

Related to this question: "Since" at the end of a sentence where it was stated that since can be used at the end of a sentence: There were the children to consider. She had told him she ...
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1answer
30 views

Is “strongly” an acceptable adverb for the verb “transfer”?

Is it acceptable to say This determines how strongly heat is transferred from A to B. ? One of the definitions of "strongly" is to a great degree or extent So the answer to the question above ...
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30 views

Monthly or per month

Which word is correct in the following sentence They pay him handsome salary and he is earning fifteen thousand rupees monthly/per month. I think both are correct
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1answer
129 views

With indefinite noun phrase how can we say 'there' is an adverb?

There is a place, next to him, sit there. There is the place, next to him, sit there. Here is my question. We can use a definite noun phrase with 'there' when 'there' means 'in that place' , but in (...
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42 views

Can You Put An Adverb Before An Adjective

I want to know that can we place an adverb before and adjective means what is the order of placing adjectives adverbs when used together or individually
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38 views

Use of “in” to show form of something

Use of “in” to show form of something confuses me. I mean can it be used in every structure while identifying form of something. Would the sentence below be correct ? New fish oils will be in pill ....
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32 views

to have just made it up

Please, tell me the meaning of the "just". I looked up in dictionary, there are many definitions and I can't choose the proper meaning. The text is: To start the last section of this chapter, I ...
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22 views

Past continous adverb placement

In the phrase: The stock scandal was extremely damaging to his company's reputation. What is the verb tense? I think "was damaging" is past continuous and "extremely" is an adverb modifying "...
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34k views

“as such” or “therefore”

Additional calculations suggest that teacher effects on college going and wages may be as much as three times larger than that predicted based on test scores alone. As such, more than half of teachers ...
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393 views

Why “much” + adjective is wrong while “much” + comparative is right?

I would like to ask for your opinion on why much can not describe a normal adjective while it can describe a comparative form of an adjective. For instance, the sentence 1, 2 are wrong while 3, 4 are ...
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3answers
29 views

Using “now” with simple past tense

"Now" as an adverb of time is commonly used with present tense but can it also be used past tense? Additionally, is the usage of "now" in the following sentence grammatically correct? Why or why not? ...
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14 views

Can I use almost and job together?

My question, as I said in the title, is that can I use almost and job together? For example, is the sentence below correct (meaning and place of almost)? Unfortunately, there is almost no job ...
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41 views

Use of less in different places

Is there any difference between uses of “less” in sentences below in terms of meaning. I mean use “less” in different place in sentences change the meaning ? Or Are word forms of them different from ...
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40 views

Is “ill-intendedly” a word?

When an adjective is used to describe an action, a verb, it becomes an adverb and is added a -ly. And so, these two sentences should be correct: It was an intended act. I intendedly did it. ...
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366 views

“He may often be seen in the Temple” — how do I interpret “may often”?

Here is a sentence from a video game: All know the emperor to be a good and holy man, for he may often be seen in the Temple of the One, making his devotions to the Nine Divines and the Communion ...
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1answer
94 views

How avoid using two adverbs in one sentence

How to use two adverbs in one sentence is been asked at least four times here: Use of two or more than two Adverbs in one sentence How do I put two adverbs together in a sentence? Two adverbs in a ...
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84 views

Usage of Anymore/Any more

Do these sentences use 'anymore/any more' correctly? We won't be trying any more of those products. We won't be trying those products anymore. Spotlight's on him now, he won't be trying anymore funny ...
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3answers
183 views

Is “as” a preposition or an adverb?

"We can even shut out everything external to us, and concentrate on an internal dialogue, as when we are lost in thought." Is "as" a preposition or an adverb? Thanks.
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33 views

Do I have to add 'as' in 'It was (as) clear as water'?

Do I have to add 'as' in the following sentence? It was (as) clear as water I ran a search on ngram and didn't find much difference between the two options.
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186 views

The difference between hard / hardly

I had a discussion with a colleague at work. I was not able to explain why the things are the way they are. I explained him the meanings and so on, with the reason "because". Topped with "take it or ...

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