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Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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1answer
28 views

About the use of “whenever” in the headline “Why Working Till Whenever Is a Risky Retirement Strategy”

Does whenever in the construction: Why Working Till Whenever Is a Risky Retirement Strategy play the role of an adverb? And more generally is it grammatical to follow up a preposition with an ...
4
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1answer
853 views

This is often vs This often is

Is it correct to write This often is done for something. rather than This is often done for something.
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4answers
373 views

Instead followed by preposition “to”

Can I use the preposition "to" after the word "instead" in a sentence? Example: let's say I'm in a situation where I bought an used computer that gave me a lot of problems and I want to say the ...
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2answers
2k views

Why does “Mission Accomplished” not have an auxiliary verb?

I thought you need to add "is/has (been)" in between? e.g. "Mission is accomplished", "Mission has been accomplished" So as "All done", shouldn't it be "All are done", "All have been completed", etc.?...
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2answers
24 views

Correct place of the adverb never

What is the difference between the following two sentences regarding the position of never? There never has arisen a great man who has not been misunderstood. There has never arisen a great ...
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2answers
28 views

Understanding the construction

I am given an exercise in which I the correct form of the verb sink is to be filled in a sentence- And thousands had _________ to the ground overpower'd. Though I know sunk will be used. But I ...
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2answers
70 views

“Hug me as tightly as how much you love me” Is this correct?

"Hug me as tightly as how much you love me." "Hug me as tightly as you love me." "Hug me as much tightly as you love me." Which is correct? Or any other suggestions?
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3answers
576 views

Look dangerously or dangerous

I wondered which is correct one- Not look dangerously Not look dangerous As look is verb, so adverb dangerously should be used But somewhere I saw Not look dangerous is correct
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2answers
37 views

“That much more so”

Two lines in the movie The Kingdom go: And after speaking with Thamer, I advised withholding additional U.S. Personnel, because a large part of the religious justification for these bombs is the ...
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2answers
893 views

Confusion over the position of an adverb

We are taught that an adverb should be placed behind the verb it modifies or at the end of the sentence. For example: 1: I run quickly; 2: I love her deeply. However, I see sentences in which the ...
2
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2answers
636 views

The methods are considered most general/generally

sentence in question: The methods that are suggested by Paul and Gerald are considered most general. In the sentence, I think that "most general" is very odd. Then, I adjusted it to "most ...
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1answer
90 views

Somewhere vs. elsewhere

What is the difference between somewhere and elsewhere. My understanding is: Somewhere-at a particular unknown place. Elsewhere-at some place. They seem identical.
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1answer
663 views

We wanted to “personally” let you know - is it correct?

Got a bit of an argument about this sentence here (this is the beginning of the email). "We wanted to personally let you know that..." Is it OK to use "personally" here? It seems grammatically ...
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5answers
230k views

“firstly … secondly …” or “first … second … ”?

Suppose I am enumerating reasons not to fly. Is it then correct to write/say: Firstly, I prefer the train because I can see the landscape. Secondly, I have control over my luggage, and thirdly, it ...
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1answer
50 views

Praise all alike

Praising all alike is praising none. This sentence is fine. But if I say Praising alike all is praising none. This is a bit weird. Why? Is there any rule that governs placing adverbs in a ...
3
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2answers
263 views

“So” and “So that”

Suppose these sentences I made with "so" The main idea is to place it somewhere so everyone can use it Please bend so I can pass It is built in a way so you can bend it and it doesn't ...
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1answer
29 views

my response is coming just up to now

First of all, let me apologize that my response is coming just up to now. I would like to ask a native speaker whether the sentence makes sense, especially the bolded part. I would like to express ...
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1answer
34 views

Correct usage with adverbial clauses

She forces him to help steal the money, then she blackmails him and takes it for herself. First he said that he was right leaning, now he's saying he is left leaning. He'd lost all his money on the ...
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1answer
23 views

Use of “past” in sentence

Would you be okay drinking milk that is few days past its expiration date? I couldn’t understand how the past is used in this sentence . Is it adverb or preposition?
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1answer
65 views

“It seems that Japanese customs have been changing since around 1920 little by little.” What’s the mistake?

According to “Objective IELTS” the above mentioned sentence needs the following correction: It seems that Japanese customs have been changing little by little since around 1920. What is the ...
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0answers
60 views

Interrogative adverb vs interrogative pronoun

Is this sentence first word Where did you find the book at last? Is (Where) an interrogative pronoun/adverb?
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1answer
77 views

I am feeling well, though not feeling well but feeling good

I was thinking about sentences like: It sounds good It sounds well I didn't see a difference and couldn't understand why "good" was used more often than "well" and I found some interesting example.....
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1answer
183 views

What is the grammar for “it mistakenly believed” in this sentence?

I just find a sentence in NYTimes quite uncomfortable even though it reads quite smooth and articulate. I never saw that kind of sentence structure as following. By putting off repairs that it ...
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3answers
12k views

“While” and “When” phrases in the future tense

When I am using the future tense, why do "while" and "when" clauses have to be in the present tense? For instance, "While I am eating you will be speaking on the phone" and "I will be ...
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1answer
158 views

Can an adverb modify an article?

In English, can an adverb modify an article? If so, I'd like to see an example sentence. I have come across some claims that an adverb can modify everything but a noun/pronoun. This means that it can ...
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2answers
467 views

Use of despite and regardless in one sentence

Regardless is an adverb which implies: in spite of everything, anyway, nevertheless, nonetheless, in any case, no matter what, despite everything, come what may For instance: Despite her recent ...
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1answer
86 views

What does 'so' actually indicate? [closed]

There's God, so here's humans. (Meaning the reason humans exist here is that God exists there) Is it indicating 'is' here? As 'so' is classified as adverb, there seems to be no words other than '...
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1answer
73 views

Absence of inversion when adverbs of place and direction go in front position

Adverbs of place and direction usually go in end position. However, they can be put in front position to emphasize location (and in this case, inversion is frequently used): “Next to the bookshelf ...
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4answers
9k views

“Since” at the end of a sentence

I am confused with this and rarely see since put at the end of a sentence: There were the children to consider. She had told him she wanted a divorce two days ago, and neither of them had slept ...
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1answer
26 views

but if I get, I'd get badly

Let's suppose someone is making you to go haywire and you're going to get furious. You are about to warn them grinding your teeth regarding your character and say that you have a long fuse and can ...
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1answer
73 views

The adverb 'already' and the past simple

What adverb can I use in sentence which is in the past simple when I cannot use the adverb already? I mean, of course British English. What do different adverbs have the same meaning as the adverb ...
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2answers
33 views

Position of an adverb in the sentences

today I wrote a sentence like this: “He punched the zombies shamelessly.” But an English man said that it was not correct, it should be: “He shamelessly punched the zombies.” He could not ...
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1answer
58 views

“This extreme…” or “This extremely…”?

I know that this question can be applied to other words in their adjective and adverb forms. But as I came across "extreme", I'm specifying my question about it. I have found them both possible ...
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1answer
23 views

Use of “double-sided “

I wonder if double-sided can be used as an adverb as is the case with sentence below. I found this sentence on the internet . This table was designed as double-sided foldable .
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1answer
44 views

what does the adverb “newly” modify in this sentence?

What does the adverb "newly" modify in this sentence? Certain Italians who were newly cognizant of Greek and Roman cultural accomplishments initiated a classical cultural rebirth after a long ...
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3answers
29 views

how to use “best” as adverb?

I have come across the below sentence: Watching sports is a very social pastime and best experienced at the place where the match is unfolding. I believe here "best" is used as an adverb. But I am ...
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1answer
25 views

Longer or any longer?

If I can say this: Will you be doing it any longer? What if I will say: Will you be doing it longer? am I obliged to use "any" or it can exist without it? Would the sense change?
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2answers
262 views

It’s all well and good

I know usually well is an adverb and good is an adjective. I can clearly see in the expression It’s all well and good that well is an adverb for is. Forgive my ignorance, but what is ‘good’ in ...
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1answer
34 views

Where should “efficiently” go? “…to use ___ the money we collected ___.”

I need to answer a business-related e-mail. The intended thing is using the money efficiently. According to some sources are expressed as follows:" to use technology wisely ". Which one is correct ...
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1answer
33 views

“move two inches” vs. “move by two inches”

He walks two kilometers every day. Is two kilometers a adverb here? Which is more appropriate: He moved two inches. He moved by two inches. Explain. Thank you.
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1answer
25 views

What type of adverb is this?

This is a question from my book: Always speak the truth. (a). Simple adverb of Number (b). Simple adverb of Manner (c). Simple adverb of Negation (d). Simple adverb of Degree ...
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1answer
392 views

'Sometimes' & 'However' at the beginning or in the middle of sentences

Which one would you prefer and when? You can go there sometimes and try out few things. Sometimes, you can go there and try out few things. Similarly, I'm having trouble understanding the ...
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1answer
20 views

Is there an adverb in here?

Is there any adverb in the below sentences? Here in this link, it says other adverbs can be used in similar constructions with various effects. He is liable to get in trouble. She is certain to ...
2
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1answer
335 views

two consecutive adverbs ending in -ly

Please consider the following sentence: "He walked home seriously angrily." This sentence sounds a bit funny to my ears, even as a non-native speaker of English, an impression that is shared by ...
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2answers
56 views

What's the difference between “Then it really got stormy” and “Then it got really stormy”?

I've noticed that adjectives are often placed loosely in sentences in English, that is, sometimes I find it hard to locate the word that they modify. Farlex Grammar provides some clues on the order of ...
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2answers
50k views

I made it home safe vs I made it home safely

Which, if any, of these sentences are correct: I made it home safe. or I made it home safely. I know that in the second example safely is an adverb, but I don't know about the first. Is it a ...
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2answers
33 views

Meaning of running out into the road

My dog is very silly ; he is always running out into the road. What does running out into mean?
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1answer
22 views

Main Clause + [; vs .]+ Conjunctive Adverb + , + Main Clause

I have read on more that a website that a conjunctive adverb is preceded by a semicolon. As far as I remember, however, I have seen more often than not a period used instead of the semicolon. Even on ...
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1answer
18 views

“Early”-— adjective to adverb

In his early matches he was not quite good. But if I would like to say the same: When he was playing { gap } he wasn't quite good. Should I put early as an adverb in the gap?
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1answer
142 views

Hurriedly vs Hurried

Maria unnecessarily picked a quarrel with Rani and left the party hurried. Is this sentence OK? I think hurriedly should be used instead of hurried. Isn't it?