Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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1answer
888 views

Adverbs at the beginning of a sentence

I found this sentence from my dictionary. I wonder why "had" is before "a moment". Hardly had a moment passed before the door creaked open. I also wonder about other words like never, once in a ...
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Is the phrase 'the best out of bests' correct?

Quite commonly used in India, the phrase "the best out of bests" is claimed to denote that you get something that is unmatched and of above-all quality. However, I avoid using this most of the times. ...
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how far does it take, or how long does it take?

I was doing an English test, and it appeared the question below. The question was stated exactly the way it is presented and there is no context, just the question: Complete with the correct form: ...
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“I have sent it to X too” vs. “I have sent it to X also”

I have sent this e-mail to Aman also. I have sent this e-mail to Aman too. Which one is correct? What is the exact difference between the two? Please explain.
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How do I use “also” in a sentence?

Which of the following sentences are grammatically correct in written text? You also are allowed to see your son. You are also allowed to see your son. Also, you are allowed to see your son. ...
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“Stay home” or “stay at home” – which is correct and why? [duplicate]

Stay home. Stay at home. When "home" functions as an adverb, it can modify the verb "stay". There are other examples, such as "go home",but there is no expression: Go to home. So I wonder ...
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“I only teach you” vs. “I teach only you” vs. “I teach you only”

I only teach you. I teach only you. I teach you only. I think that all the sentences have same meaning, but my teacher says that they are different from each other. I think that the ...
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What kind of adverbs can modify another adverb?

There's a huge market out there. The book is over there. In the first sentence, what does "out there" mean? "out" is an adverb,does it modify "there"? If I want to divide the sentence into ...
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“I would so much like to thank you” or “I would like to thank you so much”?

Are both of these sentences acceptable? I would so much like to thank you. I would like to thank you so much. If both are acceptable then which one is more formal? And what part of speech is ...
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Is this “or else” the same as “or”

He was incapable of reading one classic without relating it to another — in his edition of Chapman's Homer he scrawled lines he preferred from Pope's Homer — or else contemplating how he himself would ...
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Which part of the sentence does “still” and “almost” modify? How to judge them?

She was still beautiful at the age of forty. Does the adverb "still" modify "was" or "beautiful" ? And why? The effect is almost impossible to describe. Does the adverb "almost" modify "is" or "...
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Word order: “10 minutes more” or “10 more minutes”?

I'm still packing my clothes. I'll need 10 minutes more. I'm still packing my clothes. I'll need 10 more minutes. Are both grammatically correct?
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Placement of “easily” (adverb of manner)

A college student asks his girlfriend to help him working on his homework; then the girlfriend will naturally answer: You can get it done easily. Why ask for help? or: You should easily get it ...
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1answer
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Are these predicative complements or adverbials?

As Harry helped himself to a treacle tart, the talk turned to their families. "I'm half-and-half," said Seamus. "Me dad's a Muggle. Mom didn't tell him she was a witch 'til after they were ...
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Putting Adverbs at the Beginning of the Sentence

Can we put any adverb that ending with-ly at the beginning of a sentence? Sometimes, it ’s quite difficult for me to decide where I can put an adverb in a sentence so I wonder if I can put any adverb ...
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When and how to use the words 'Maybe' and 'may be'?

I read this tip Use 'maybe if 'perhaps' works'. But is this correct? Are they both adverbs? Or one is an adverb and the other is a verb phrase? This is still not clear to me. I would ...
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Up to what level the adverbs 'firstly', 'secondly', 'thirdly' and so on is acceptable?

This question is different from the one that's already asked here. I'm asking about the levels here. About research: Trust me...the Internet gave me up to nineteenthly and to be frank, I then ...
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The meaning of “still-beating”

I could hear a still-beating pulse of his heart. Could it mean two things? It is still beating. (still now) It is beating quietly.
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The night before last night?

I could say "I am leaving the day after tomorrow," but what if I want to reference the night before last night? Do I say, "I left the night before last night"? What do native speakers say both ...
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1answer
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“well” to express a possibility

I would like to know if both of the following are correct, especially if the 2 is correct. We are talking about the possibility that that task may be assigned to me That task could be very well ...
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1answer
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How do I find the adverbs in my writing? [closed]

I have to find adverbs in my writing and other students' writing, but I get confused about how to accurately identify just what is the adverb. I have capitalized a piece of writing to show what I ...
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1answer
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Which is correct, “three only apples” or “only three apples”?

I wonder which one is correct: three only apples only three apples If "only three apples" is correct, which does "only" modify? Does it modify "three" or "three apples"? Why?
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“It won't take but a moment”

I open the door. "Marlena!" I say, swinging the door farther open than I intend to. "What are you doing up? I mean, are you okay? Do you want to sit down?" "No," she says. Her face is ...
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“What do you care?”

  "I'm leaving anyway."   "What the hell are you talking about?"   I can't answer. I can't tell him that not only have I disgraced myself beyond belief or ...
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How to use “what is more”?

Just curious if "what is more" is basically the same as "furthermore". It seems to be an expression that creates emphasis, right? How about the following sentence: I am a great admirer of her films;...
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'… has been injured for about a week now' vs. '… was injured for about a week now'

Kitty: 'Jair, my middle finger has been injured for about a week now'. (1) Kitty: 'Jair, my middle finger was injured for about a week now'. (2) Could now be ungrammatical in (2)? Or, otherwise, ...
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'I, too, am waiting …' and 'I, also, am waiting …'

Kitty: I'm waiting for a banana. Jair: I, too, am waiting for a banana. (1) Jair: I, also, am waiting for a banana. (2) Which is correct, (1) or (2)? If both, what's the difference? Plus, ...
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Why is 'where' an adverb and not a pronoun?

A: Where are you going? B: I am going to school. Where took the place of school and something that takes the place of a noun is a pronoun. So, why isn't where a pronoun?
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“Incredulous” as an adverb

The below quote is an example that Longman has provided to illustrate the usage of the adjective "incredulous". I believe in this example, "incredulous" in used as an adverb. Please help me understand ...
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However, in spite of

Is it appropriate if I form a sentence by using two of these conjunctive adverbs like in the following sentence? However, in spite of her attitude, he did well. Is however quite redundant?
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Adjective or Adverb: unconsciously vs unconscious

Position of Adjectives: An adjective nearly always appears immediately before the noun or noun phrase that they modify. The source is here. But if you look at the following sentence, the adjective "...
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Is this a way how a native speaker would naturally express exaggeration?

You watch someone lift a 200kg weight. How would you say to someone else that he is strong? "He was so strong, that he could lift a 200 kg weight." Using the structure so...that or "He was ...
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'like anything' as an intensifier

I have seen a person using 'like anything' as intensifier. Freedictionary website gave these example of 'like anything':- He ran like anything. (intensifier; usually euphemistic) We worked like ...
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Difference between 'good' and 'well'

What can I say instead of "I'm very tired, I guess I'm sick"? I don't feel good. I don't feel well. I feel bad. I'm not good. I'm not well.
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Adverb vs. adjective

I am not sure which sentence is correct. In general the weights could be arbitrary chosen, but one special case is obtained by using exponential weights. In general the weights could be ...
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“Normal distributed” or “normally distributed”

I am not sure if I should use an adjective or an adverb in the following sentences. The returns are normal distributed. The returns are normally distributed. Also see this example: ...
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how can we use “literally”? [closed]

What does literally exactly mean? I am not so clear about its meaning, and I often get confused.
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What grammatical terms do you use for this so?

Hermione let out a great sigh and Harry, amazed, saw that she was smiling, the very last thing he felt like doing. "Brilliant," said Hermione. "This isn't magic –– it's logic –– a puzzle. A lot ...
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Where is the correct place to place adverbs in sentences?

I am always confused about where to put adverbs in sentences. For example, consider the questions below: Why did they target us specifically? Why did they target specifically us? Why did ...
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Which fits better “more important” or “more importantly”? [duplicate]

Sorry - I always think the question is obvious when plainly it is not. Should I use "important" or "importantly" in the introductory phase of this sentence: "Appellant's argument is premature. ...
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Is “scarcely” an intensifier?

That was the country he liked best, over there; those sandhills dwindling away into darkness. One could walk all day without meeting a soul. There was not a house scarcely, not a single village for ...
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“Wrote it wrong” or “wrote it wrongly”?

Which is grammatically correct? He wrote it wrong. He wrote it wrongly.
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Any problems in saying `good to know (about) that`?

Are there any problems in saying the following when responding to one answer in the comment? good to know (about) that? How do I refine that? well to know that? nice to know that?
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What does “much” add to the meaning of “How 'much' common were these crimes?”

The dictionary I consulted says that how much is used for asking or saying what the amount of something is: (1) How much common were these crimes? (2) How common were these crimes? But, after ...
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Is “deep” an adjective or adverb?

She worked quickly but without hurry. She put an old apron to cover her clothes. In the basement she found a jelly jar with a top and carried it out to the carriage house where the tools were kept. In ...
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Significance of 'only' in this sentence

I read this sentence somewhere: SpongeBob SquarePants became famous only in 2000's. Is this equivalent to "SpongeBob SquarePants became famous in 2000's", or does it mean that the SpongeBob ...
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2answers
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“I'm not able to make it fly high”

I'm not able to make it fly high. If I change not able to unable, will it retain the same meaning? When should I use not able and when unable? Is the phrase fly high correct? Suppose I'm trying to ...
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1answer
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Verb Tense to use with the phrase “so far”

What verb tense should we use when we have the phrase, "so far" in the sentence? How was your day so far? How is your day so far? How has your day been so far?
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For ever and forever

What is the difference between the meaning and usage of for ever and forever in British English? From what I could gather from my online research, forever means : (also for ever) for all ...
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“Recently he insured for” vs.“He insured recently for”

Recently he insured for / He insured recently for a mediclaim policy. As per my understanding the adverb should be placed as near as possible to the verb it modifies, so I think the latter ...