Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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3
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1answer
10k views

I have done that before vs I have done that

Is there a difference between "I have done that before" and "I have done that"? I'm not sure if these sentences make sense: A: "Have you ever done this before?" B: "Yes, I have done that ...
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1answer
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Can “quite” modify adjectives and adverbs in the comparative degree?

They laughed, they cried, but it was not quite better than ''Cats.'' They were there, after all, to buy Memories. (The New York Times) “Oh my God! Wembley Stadium. Yeah, my God. So it’s going to ...
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“Due to expectedly inclement weather conditions…”

Does this sound okay? "Due to expectedly inclement weather conditions..." I am especially interested in the use of "expectedly."
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3answers
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Deep vs Deeply in the sentence?

Atlantic Ocean has a deeply/deep indented coast line which facilitates trading and other mercantile activities. My understanding says deeply would be the appropriate choice. But I'm not sure.
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Particle or preposition [closed]

Is "looking forward" in this sentence an adverb? Is to in this sentence a particle, a preposition, or neither? I am looking forward to getting a good job?
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692 views

Is “further” really used as synonym of “farther”?

The OALD, for the meaning of further says: (comparative of far) (especially BrE) at or to a greater distance SYN farther Is further really used as synonym of farther? As far as I recall, there is ...
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3answers
127 views

“Fall under the keys” versus “fall behind the keys”

When talking of something (for example, breadcrumbs) that can fall on my keyboard and end between the key and the keyboard, what should I say? Breadcrumbs can fall under the keys. Breadcrumbs can ...
4
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1answer
342 views

Can we replace 'ever' with 'not always' in “Rarely, or 'ever'”

"Rarely, or ever, did any maid or wife leave that court chaste," observed the sixteenth-century French ... (The New York Times) I'm still not able to correctly use "ever" even if, when I read such ...
4
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1answer
253 views

Can “no more” have a time-related meaning?

A. They are no more susceptible than any other team. B. Although we see no more insects, they own our woods. If I'm not wrong, "A" more is notionally different from "B" more due to the fact that ...
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3answers
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Is using “similarly” in this sentence correct?

They all are dressed up similarly for the party. Is this use of similarly correct/appropriate? I did not get many results when I looked this phrase up on Google. I also tried the phrase with "alike" ...
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3answers
469 views

Bumper sticker: “Eat Local”

For a great while, I have always thought that the bumper sticker "Eat Local" was grammatically incorrect. I was under the impression it should say "Eat Locally." But, now, for some reason, I am ...
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2answers
226 views

Is ‘upside down’ a depictive adjunct for ‘a note’?

“...and from yet another pocket inside his overcoat he pulled an owl -- a real, live, rather ruffled-looking owl - a long quill, and a roll of parchment. With his tongue between his teeth he ...
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2answers
969 views

Confusion over the position of an adverb

We are taught that an adverb should be placed behind the verb it modifies or at the end of the sentence. For example: 1: I run quickly; 2: I love her deeply. However, I see sentences in which the ...
2
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1answer
92 views

Parse “asking for books back”

Harry picked it up and stared at it, his heart twanging like a giant elastic band. No one, ever, in his whole life, had written to him. Who would? He had no friends, no other relatives - he didn't ...
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5answers
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“by far” vs. “much”

Let us suppose that, among other people, there are two folks, Kristina and Monica, who are imaginative in a different degree. Kristina is much the most imaginative of them all. Monica is by ...
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Does changing the position of an adverb change the meaning of these sentences?

I always get confused between the placement of adverbs: She has only ten dollars. Only she has ten dollars. I answered only four questions. I only answered four questions. I think the ...
2
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1answer
226 views

Article and no article

“She is Mr. Rochester’s ward; he commissioned me to find a governess for her. He intended to have her brought up in - shire, I believe. Here she comes, with her ‘bonne,’ as she calls her nurse.” The ...
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1answer
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Can the adverb ‘next’ be placed before its modified verb?

South African track star Oscar Pistorius has been granted bail over the murder of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp. The decision was made after a four-day hearing, with the magistrate ruling the ...
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2answers
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Is there a more restrictive criterion to distinguish a preposition from an adverb

The definition normally given for adverb is similar to the following one: a word or phrase that modifies or qualifies an adjective, verb, or other adverb or a word-group Preposition is normally ...
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3answers
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How can 'twice' be an adverb?

I’m twice your age. (Oxford Dictionaries) It looks like ‘twice’ is a preposition to me, yet it’s an adverb. On what procedure do you think in your brain, can this be an adverb?
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1answer
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“as such” or “therefore”

Additional calculations suggest that teacher effects on college going and wages may be as much as three times larger than that predicted based on test scores alone. As such, more than half of teachers ...
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1answer
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Can we use adverb phrase with conjunction plus noun phrase?

I could not remember him; but I knew that he was my own uncle—my mother’s brother—that he had taken me when a parentless infant to his house; and that in his last moments he had required a promise ...
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3answers
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Are words ending in -ly adverbs?

Adverbs often end in -ly. But the word friendly is not an adverb, is it? A friendly advice is incorrect, but a friendly person is correct. Is the word friendly very unusual or are there many non-...
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Help clearing confusion in a dangling modifier

Today, several users on a Facebook group were requesting me to send some materials to them via email. So I thought to assure them and I commented using the following sentence: I will send the ...
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“Pretty” versus “quite” [duplicate]

Is there any difference between using pretty, and quite, in the following sentences? I am pretty good at playing soccer. I am quite good at playing soccer. How are you? I am quite well. ...
63
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5answers
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“firstly … secondly …” or “first … second … ”?

Suppose I am enumerating reasons not to fly. Is it then correct to write/say: Firstly, I prefer the train because I can see the landscape. Secondly, I have control over my luggage, and thirdly, it ...
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2answers
872 views

Does “It snowed hard Monday” require an “on”?

I came across an English learner writing It snowed hard Monday. After saying that it didn't snow on Friday and Saturday. It didn't quite feel right to me. I'd be okay with It snowed hard. or ...
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2answers
470 views

Under what circumstances does an adverb not get -ly?

I learned in school that it's correct to say really good. On the internet I've also seen real good. Is this grammatically incorrect, or are there particular circumstances under which this is correct? ...

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