Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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interpretation of 'I stayed some days' — 'for some days straight' or 'on days for a total of some days'?

A stand-alone sentence, 'I stayed some days' --- if 'some' in this sentence were restricted to meaning 'an unspecified number of,' which would it mean I stayed on days for a total of an unspecified ...
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2k views

“Firstly, secondly, thirdly,…”, what comes next? [duplicate]

Similar to this Question How would you complete the following sequence, until point 10? Firstly Secondly Thirdly ... Any help would be appreciated.
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Placing of adverbs [duplicate]

I am confused where to place the adverb certainly She certainly has gone up in my estimation since she told the manager what she thought of him. She has certainly gone up in my estimation ...
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1answer
238 views

“That's the exactly reason why …” vs “That's the exact reason why …”

exact vs exactly Which expression is right? Or Both of them? And why? "That's the very reason" is another expression with the same meaning?
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I lived on a small island for one year ten years ago

Is the following sentence grammatically correct and does it sound normal? Can we use two time adverbs in the same sentence as follows. I lived on a small island for one year ten years ago. In ...
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Can I write “His ideas are strategically and linguistically structured”? [closed]

Can I write this: His ideas are strategically and linguistically structured. Can I use two adverbs separated by "and"?
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“I told you earlier” or “I told before”? [closed]

Could you tell me if I have to use earlier or before after tell in the following context. Person A: why didn't you tell me that Kate and John are going to get married. Person B: Actually, I ...
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dancing acrobatically

a. Dancing acrobatically is something I enjoy very much. b. I enjoy dancing acrobatically very much. I think (b) means that I like to dance acrobatically. I like to do that. (a) could have that ...
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“operates similar to” vs. “operates similarly to”

I wonder which form(s) are correct amongst the following: It operates similar to the above-mentioned mechanism. It operates similarly to the above-mentioned mechanism. Looking at Google, "operates ...
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2answers
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Real as an adverb and adjective

Real can be used as adjective as well as adverb. As an adverb meaning of real is very Therefore I think its usage in the following sentence is correct The real important thing to remember is that ...
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1answer
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too and either usage differences

A: I don't like oranges. B: I don't like oranges either. This is the right way to express this idea. question 1: But why can't it be written like this: B: I too don't like oranges. question ...
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Too vs Either in agreement of negative sentences

SAM: I don’t like choclates. BOB: 1) I too, don’t like choclates. (Or) 2)I don’t like choclates, either. What would be the correct sentence of Bob, Sentence1 or Sentence2? If anyone sentence of ...
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Much vs Very usage differences

I was much exhausted in the evening. (Here very exhausted is wrong) She is very tired after a day’s work. (Here much tired is wrong) My grammar book said above sentences. Although the kind of ...
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1answer
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no one and no one else differences

She has no one else to look after her but me. She has no one to look after her but me. Which is correct? What is the difference between these two sentences?
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No one vs No one else usage

John is my best friend. No one likes me more than he does. John is my best friend. No one else likes me more than he does. 1) Which is correct? What is the difference between these two sentences?...
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1answer
517 views

But vs Except usage

She has no one to look after her except me. She has no one to look after her but me. Which is correct? My grammar book says sentence2 is correct. What is the difference between BUT and EXCEPT ...
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531 views

Usage Too, As well and Also in negative sentences

I also/too don't understand why they're here Is this sentence correct? My grammar book is saying that this sentence is wrong and we should use either in negative sentences. For example above sentence ...
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4answers
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Placement of ALSO in a sentence

She found her bag and money also. She found her bag and also money. Which is correct? My grammar book is saying sentence 2 is correct, as “ALSO” shouldn’t come at the end of the sentence. Why so?...
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Regard vs Consider

I regard him as my brother. I consider him my brother. Although regard and consider are synonyms, why As is used in sentence1 with regard and why not in sentence2?
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Much vs very usage [duplicate]

He is much interested in the project He is very interested in the project. What is the difference between these two sentences?
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use of more (adv) with 'than

We say: I am more intelligent than you. I earn more than you do. I like you more than your brother. Can we say: You show devotion to me more than him. I feel there has to be the preposition 'to'...
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Can we use a future verb with “as”

I wonder whether in the case below I need to use present tense or future tense". Also, I wonder in any case what the general rule of it is. Please bear in mind that I insist on using "as" since I want ...
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1answer
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What is the difference between below/above and over/under?

I would like to know the difference between above and over when these words mean "more than" and the differnce between between below and under when these words mean "less than". Are some difference ...
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use of just and recently

In the following sentence is the use of both just and recently at the same time correct? I just got back a short while ago from India recently and we are working very much with India and we have a ...
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1answer
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Place of continuously as an adverb

As far as I know we can't use an adverb before the objects. Like that. I painted carefully the house [incorrect] I carefully painted the house [correct] I painted the house carefully [correct] But ...
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Either quiet or quietly

In the following sentence is quietly incorrectly used? I was surprised to see every student sitting quietly in the class, even though the teacher was not present According to my book quietly is ...
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106 views

Either proactive or proactively?

What is the difference between the following two sentences? 1.The private sector is responding as well, sometimes proactive and sometimes concurrent with government mandates. 2.The private ...
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What does “just down” mean/imply here?

Two people are sitting in a bar. One of them says to the other: If you're looking for a place to eat, you should try the cafe just down the street. What does "just down" mean/imply here?
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Usage of the adverb “largely”

I am confused about the use of "largely", an adverb, in the following sentence I read in a newspaper today India has imposed a largely successful lockdown. Here, the adverb "largely&...
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“without” verb adverb position

How do we say this correctly: "you can't do that without doing this first" OR "you can't do that without first doing this"? Similary "I want you to do always your homework timely" "I want you to ...
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Can we say “Turn the scooter away / outward / off”?

away: to a different place or in a different direction Go away! Put your toys away. The bright light made her look away. Look at the picture below Your child was riding a scooter and ...
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Be in a place vs Be around a place (Difference)

I would like to know the difference between "to be in a country/state/city/place" and "to be around a country/state/city/place." Examples: Jim had been in Washington for years, and knew all the ...
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1answer
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Is Up after some verbs optional?

From time to time, I see the preposition up appearing alongside a verb or a verb phrase and doesn't add anything to the meaning (or at least, it seems so). Examples: Buckle (up)! We have a long ...
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1answer
646 views

Good enough Vs well enough

Which one of the two options should I use in the following sentences: I can't play football good/well enough to be in your team. The house isn't protected good/well enough. I'm doing good/well (...
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76 views

“Be about to'' vs. ”Be going to"

If you say "something is about to happen" or "something is going to happen", you mean that "it will happen very soon" : The man is about to die. The man is going to die. What is the ...
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Be about to : Which parts of speech is 'about'?

"The man is about to die." "The film was about to start" According to P. K. De Sarkar's grammar book "to die" is a noun Infinitive used as the object of a preposition 'about'. But Macmillan ...
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1answer
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Using the adverb “again” after the idiom “repeating oneself”

I was wondering whether it would sound superfluous if I add the adverb "again" to the end of the sentence: Steve Rogers: Well, what are we gonna do now? Tony Stark: You know what, give me a ...
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Do we have adverbs that express the sounds of dogs or babies, for example, can we say “the dog barks bow-gow” and “The baby cries wah-wah”?

Do we have adverbs that express the sounds of dogs or babies? If we don't, then can we invent them? For example, can we say "the dog barks bow-gow" and "The baby cries wah-wah"?
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I can't explain why the adverb 'so' is wrong in this context

"Hi, I hope you are doing well in this so strange situation." As an adverb of degree, it should work, but I have never heard this and it sounds wrong. Is there a reason?
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Is the phrase “one too many times” an adverb? If it is, what kind of adverb is it?

If "one too many times" is an adverb What kind of adveb is "one too many times"?
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Where can I add “already” in “I am going to have gone to bed by the time you come home”?

I am going to have gone to bed by the time you come home Where can I add "already" in this question?
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Gerund, infinitive or root form

“Once you crossed the whole camp on foot, asking for a glass of water is not a surprise”. I used the gerund (asking) because it sounds to me like the correct form in this case, once I couldn’t find ...
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39 views

Differences between Quite, Fairly, Rather, and Pretty

I read in a grammar book that Fairly is less strong than the others in meaning, and also the meanings of the rest are the same, I mean each of them is as strong as the others. But, I read in a ...
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Adverb location

What is the difference of the meaning of the following two satements? She said hardly anything. and She hardly said anything.
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Though as an adverb

We went to high school together. I haven't seen her for years, though. Here the word though is an adverb, I was just wondering if someone could tell me why it is considered an adverb in this instance ...
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Adjective vs Adverb

Tom bought some flowers that smelled nice. Why is nice considered an adjective in this sentence? Is nice not modifying smelled and therefore an adverb?
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167 views

Should I use “noisy” or “noisily” in this sentence?

She set her cup on the glass table, a bit too noisily. Grammarly changed noisily to noisy. I think it should be noisily because it should modify the verb set. However, there are instances where ...
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Emphasize something with two adverbs

Do you use two adverbs before noun to emphasize something or do you end sentence with three adverbs maybe informal in an informal setting if not formal way? If you do then what is adverb orders? Can ...
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673 views

Is it correct to say “ I have been working out lately”?

I want to know if is correct to say: I have been working out my body lately. If the answer is yes, I want to know can I put the adverb “lately” at the beginning of the sentence or remove it ...
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What's the adverb to unencrypted?

"This data must always be stored securely and never unencryptedly, i.e. never store this data in an unencrypted fashion"? Is there an adverb for unencrypted?

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