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Questions tagged [american-english]

This tag is for questions specifically related to the English language as spoken and written in the USA. If you are interested in a difference between American English and British English, please use transatlantic-differences.

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British or American English

Is the phrase “stative verb” used also in American English or only in British English? I’ve only known it as “state of being verbs” in American English. Thank you.
Jimi Bernard's user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
42 views

Are both of these sentences correct in American English?

Please! Native American English speakers only! Someone asks you two personal questions and then they add: You don't have to answer either of the questions. You have to answer neither of the ...
Idunno's user avatar
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-2 votes
0 answers
66 views

Can cure be pronounced like jure? [closed]

I was listening to the following script at https://m.tingclass.net/show-6698-114868-1.html, starting from 3:13 Republicans claim the price tag will run higher and are trying to emphasize other ...
Tim's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
46 views

Can someone explain the difference of "note" vs "take note"? Thanks

Can someone explain the difference of "note" vs "take note"? Both have the meaning of "paying special attention". Is the "special attention" the same with both ...
Quốc Anh Phạm's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
57 views

When can we omit the article in front of a countable word in singular?

In the sentence below, there is no "the" in front of former President. I am wondering what is the grammar rule for that? Under Smith and his successor, Douglas, Canada sought closer trade ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
329 views

What does this quote from "Mr. Dooley" mean?

Could anyone please help me understand this quote of Mr. Dooley from the self-help book "Pushing to the front, Chapter LXII: A College Education at Home" by Orison Swett Marden: "...
Saeed Vrz's user avatar
  • 169
3 votes
3 answers
1k views

what does this phrase mean "placed on her end"?

I found this expression on this reading passage: The RMS Titanic left Southampton for New York on April 10, 1912. On board were some of the richest and most famous people of the time who had paid ...
sitikurniaty rasyad's user avatar
15 votes
8 answers
6k views

If "Good luck finding a new job" is sarcastic, how do I change the sentence to make it sound well-intentioned? [closed]

I have read on many websites that Good luck finding a new job is sarcastic and not a well-intentioned wish. How do I make it well-intentioned and still use finding?
Idunno's user avatar
  • 307
2 votes
4 answers
820 views

Are these called ring binders in American English or files?

This what they look like on the inside: In many videos, I heard them called lever arch files but the people in those vids were British.
S635's user avatar
  • 245
2 votes
2 answers
50 views

Under or in a carport?

Which preposition is correct? Under or in? I think in is the correct one but I am not sure as there are partly enclosed carports and there are also carports which are canopy-like. She has a carport ...
S635's user avatar
  • 245
0 votes
1 answer
41 views

Are these price stickers or price labels or both in American English?

Are these price stickers or price labels in American English?
S635's user avatar
  • 245
8 votes
2 answers
1k views

Are these labels or stickers?

I am inclined to call these labels as they are stuck onto something, e.g. an exercise book, a small medicine bottle or box and then you can write the child's name or the dosage on the label.
S635's user avatar
  • 245
-2 votes
2 answers
58 views

High or tall car and desk and screen?

With which adjective is it natural to use the words screen, car/vehicle, table. I already know that when something is high off the ground, it has great distance between itself and the ground. Tall is ...
K945's user avatar
  • 37
-3 votes
1 answer
64 views

Question Nr.2: Are these cubbies or not in AmE? [duplicate]

I still don't know whether I can call the storage spaces I have put red circles around cubbyholes/cubbies because below my previous question many have given different answers and I just don't know who ...
S635's user avatar
  • 245
4 votes
3 answers
708 views

Difference between conflicted and ambivalent?

I have been racking my brain and consulting several dictionaries to tease out the difference but these two adjectives are too similar both in terms of definition and use. Here are the defitinitons ...
S635's user avatar
  • 245
3 votes
4 answers
121 views

Are the storage spaces of this piece of furniture called cubby holes? Can they be called cubby holes?

Are the storage spaces of this piece of furniture called cubby holes? Can they be called cubby holes? I am specifically interested in American English. I have consulted many dictionaries but I am not ...
S635's user avatar
  • 245
-1 votes
2 answers
68 views

What do you call the ''rope'' you move a rolling shutter up and down with in American English?

What do you call the ''rope'' you move a rolling shutter up and down with in American English?
Z6547's user avatar
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-2 votes
2 answers
55 views

What is the difference between earlier and sooner in the contexts I have provided and in similar contexts? I still don't understand [closed]

For the sake of finally ending all this, please explain the difference between earlier and sooner in relation to my three sentences and don't provide me with any unsolicited only indirectly related ...
K945's user avatar
  • 37
0 votes
1 answer
59 views

What is the difference between earlier and sooner in these contexts?

Person A gets a promotion in March and person B gets a promotion in May. Did Person A get a promotion 1 month earlier or sooner than Person B? Their train left three minutes sooner or earlier than ...
K945's user avatar
  • 37
1 vote
1 answer
39 views

What does "walk down the road" mean? [duplicate]

What do people mean by I was walking down the street And does it have the same meaning as I was walking on the street
Skylen Dias's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
65 views

What kind of chair is this?

It's low. Probably only a toddler could stand up easily.
K945's user avatar
  • 37
-1 votes
2 answers
65 views

Do restaurants have patios or terraces in the US and in Canada? What's the difference?

Restaurants often have outdoor areas which are often referred to as either patio or terrace on the Internet. A wikipedia article about patio says restaurants have patios as outdoor areas but I have ...
K945's user avatar
  • 37
-2 votes
1 answer
33 views

Does "Got to do something" have the same meaning as "Have to do something"? [duplicate]

Do these sentences have the same meaning? I have to go I got to go (I gotta go)
Skylen Dias's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
119 views

Is there a British English equivalent of a "straight-A student"?

My 18-year-old private student, Italian, is taking the Cambridge Advance English exam in July. I am marking their essay which has the following phrase: … by observing the dedication of these high-ace ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.9k
0 votes
1 answer
61 views

Difference between merge and converge in path/road/lane-related contexts?

Cambridge Dictionary and Merriam Webster Dictionary use converge and merge in very similar ways. Cambridge uses the verb converge the following way in path/road/lane-related contexts. converge at: ...
K945's user avatar
  • 37
2 votes
1 answer
57 views

Is ''grace someone with you presence'' always humorous?

I have seen that many dictionaries say this expression is humorous. If that's true, what other alternatives exist that can be used in a formal setting such as a business meeting or at a meeting in ...
K945's user avatar
  • 37
1 vote
2 answers
157 views

What is this kind of gate in the US and Canada called?

On the Internet, I have seen many names such as revolving gate, turnstile gate, revolving gate with turnstiles or just turnstile. I don't really trust every source on the Internet because there are ...
K945's user avatar
  • 37
11 votes
5 answers
4k views

What is a building with two floors called?

In American English, the first floor is the floor that is on the same level with ground, which is called ground floor in British English. And British first floor is American second floor. Given this, ...
sundowner's user avatar
  • 564
0 votes
3 answers
70 views

Are these called "columns" of students or "vertical rows" of students? [duplicate]

Are these called columns of students or vertical rows of students? If they are called neither, what are they called then in AmE? I have circled the vertical rows of students in blue to know the thing ...
W55's user avatar
  • 35
1 vote
0 answers
25 views

Which one of these sentences is correct? | I have never been vs I never have been

I saw the following sentence on the internet (which was in American English) I never have been angry But would it be wrong if it was written like the following? I have never been angry
Skylen Dias's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
53 views

Difference between columns,rows and lines in three dimensional spaces?

What's the difference between a line, a column and a row in three dimensional contexts? (I know that a column also means ''a supporting structure'' and that's not what this post is about). Please, ...
W55's user avatar
  • 35
1 vote
2 answers
140 views

What would you call these interior balconies? Interior balconies or just the second/third/etc. story? (AmE)

I am talking about those balcony structures that often partly jut out over the story below them. For example, in the atrium of a mall or in a fancy mansion. In the first picture, that balcony wraps ...
Idk29's user avatar
  • 371
-1 votes
1 answer
74 views

Are mezzanine and loft interchangeable in American English and Canadian English? If not, what's the difference?

Ok, so I have tried to get to the bottom of all this but I ended up even more confused. According to Cambridge Dictionary, the structure I have put a circle around is a mezzanine because the ...
Idk29's user avatar
  • 371
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

Have I used ''spin your wheels'' correctly?

When learning a language, language learners often feel like they are spinning their wheels as progress is so gradual that many think they are stuck and aren't improving at all. Is that a correct use ...
Idk29's user avatar
  • 371
-1 votes
1 answer
48 views

Are these three structures pavilions in American and Canadian English?

Are these three structures pavilions in American and Canadian English?
Idk29's user avatar
  • 371
7 votes
2 answers
970 views

What is the difference between ''a spool'' and ''a reel''?

Are they interchangeable? According to dictionaries, spool is more prevalent in America whereas reel is more common in the UK but distinguishing between them doesn't seem this straightforward because ...
Idk29's user avatar
  • 371
1 vote
1 answer
136 views

What is this enclosed space that projects out of the house called?

Source What do you call that enclosed space sticking out of the house in the US?
Idk29's user avatar
  • 371
1 vote
0 answers
52 views

How would you translate "le rendez-vous du tout Paris" in English?

This is a "famous" French expression and to be honest, I thought Anglophone speakers used it too, I was almost sure I'd heard it before. Some research online and no results. Do you know if ...
Mathilde Da Silva's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
50 views

'Will miss' vs 'Will be missing'

I saw this sentence: You'll be missing the sunshine once you're back in England. Would it be wrong if it was written like this? You'll miss the sunshine once you're back in England.
Skylen Dias's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
366 views

Do 'have got' and 'got' have the same meaning in American English?

Could someone explain me the following sentences: I have gotten an idea I got an idea I have an idea I have got an idea I want to know how/when native American speakers use the above sentences
Skylen Dias's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
47 views

Could I use "that" if I merely have one bike?

On https://www.grammarly.com/blog/which-vs-that/, it says In a restrictive clause, use that. In a nonrestrictive clause, use which. It shows two examples. My bike that has a broken seat is in the ...
ZhangLiao's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
33 views

Is the expression “Don't care a fiddlestick” often used in American English?

I've learning today this sentence, "Don't care a fiddlestick". When do you use this expression? Is it a saying or just in writing and reading? I really want to know about that.
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
60 views

Is the phrase “target improvement” commonly known and used?

In my spare time, I prep Italian teenagers for English language exams and recently I have been reading essays, articles, reviews, and informal emails that have been generated by ChatGPT. I let the ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.9k
0 votes
2 answers
44 views

"I'll get do something" or "I'll get doing something"

Today, I learned an expresion from ELSA app. "What's the wifi password? I'll get set up now.", which confused me. As I know, It should be "I'll get doing something", e.g. "I'...
Devin Johw's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
29 views

Is it correct to use first person, second person, and third person in a sentence?

For example: In my opinion, I don't think you should have eaten leftovers from three days ago since eating leftovers is bad for us.
David's user avatar
  • 27
1 vote
2 answers
50 views

How to ask for the answer "I'm the third year of PhD"?

If I desire a answer "I'm in the third year of PhD" from someone with both the year and degree in it, how could I ask with just one sentence?
Devin Johw's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
59 views

Are commas needed in “a small white oblong helicopter”?

I'm having trouble deciding whether these are cumulative or coordinate adjectives. There's nothing unusual to note about the context. The writer is describing a helicopter that looks a bit different ...
mleo's user avatar
  • 31
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

I slipped/have slipped on... I think I broke/have broken my

The following is from a movie called "Home Abduction" (here's a link to that moment on YouTube): Woman #2 goes upstairs. Woman #1 is waiting for her downstairs. Woman #1 hears woman #2 ...
prof1589's user avatar
  • 256
0 votes
2 answers
92 views

Do American say "fugly"?

Cambridge dictionary says fugly adjective mainly UK very informal UK /ˈfʌɡ.li/ US /ˈfʌɡ.li/ Add to word list very ugly: Oh, that girl is fugly! It seems this is a slang from UK Do American ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
2 votes
1 answer
90 views

Is Doug pronounced dug or door-g?

I remember many years ago when I was in Durham, UK, people pronounce the name Doug as door-g. However, I look up the dictionary and Oxford dict online and many other sources, they clearly say that ...
Chenxi's user avatar
  • 21

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