Questions tagged [american-english]

This tag is for questions specifically related to the English language as spoken and written in the USA. If you are interested in a difference between American English and British English, please use transatlantic-differences.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
-2
votes
1answer
56 views

What is the American equivalent of "catch out"?

"Catch out" would be a good addition to my vocabulary, but it's from BrE (which is less relevant and has fewer speakers, no offence). What do they say in the US to convey that meaning?
11
votes
3answers
3k views

Why "years to life" instead "years of life"?

That is the Headline: Teenager Sentenced to 14 Years to Life in Tessa Majors Murder why the use of preposition "to" in this case? I wonder if "years of life" would convey same ...
1
vote
2answers
60 views

What is the definition of "big tent pop " in this context?

the headline is: "Listen to ‘Popcast’ A conversation about the Weeknd’s new album and making big tent pop in an age of the micro." I googled big tent and the definition seems not to fit in ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Is "I hope I was of good help" idiomatic in English?

I was talking to a friend and I wanted to say something like: "I hope I was of (good/any) help." The phrase "be of help" is used in expressions like "How can I be of help?&...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

Original with me

There are many ideas in this book which are, to the best of my knowledge, original with me. A favorite technique, original with him, he called "word-count." I do not know whether this ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

I'm not sure how should interpret this sentence

The sentence is a headline in NYtimes: "In the U.S. cities that had some of the earliest Omicron surges, I.C.U. stays and deaths are following case curves upward." My brain is having ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

What is the semantic behind "all thing something" like in "all thing pet"?

I came across "all thing pet" myself in my country although it is not a native english speaking Nation and also there is a Church Song: "All things bright and beautiful" What I ...
1
vote
2answers
72 views

Can you tell if the word "Struggle" is a noun or a verb in this sentence?

I came across this headline: "Class Struggle in My Family’s Hometown" Can you tell if "Struggle" is a noun or verb without any further context?
0
votes
0answers
15 views

What is the word "over doing in this sentence? [duplicate]

The sentence i came across today is: "What is Ryan doing over at the bar hitting on that holstein?" I don't get the sense o "over in it. Also it seems useless in there. right? "...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

seems I can reorder a phrase like that and keep the gist, right?

In the text(wirh is a headline): "A snowstorm left hundreds stuck overnight on the interstate south of Washington. A United States senator was among those trapped." Can i rewrite the part: &...
-1
votes
0answers
31 views

Is " overall standing" an expression?

I was looking up the definition of "status check" and hit the urban dictionary and read this: "Similar to a cup check, but for ones overall standing at the moment." I was not able ...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

how to interpret this adjective alone, not linked to any noun?

I came across this headline: "Coming soon to this coal county: solar, in a big way" is "solar" in this context a generalization? like referring to solar panels and everything ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

do theses phrases really differ?

unfortunately I have no context to provide, But as a learner I've been thinking a lot about adjective positions and trying to understand its usage. One case sticks to mind: "a divided house"...
2
votes
2answers
50 views

can someone pinpoint the difference between "proper" and "properly" in these sentences?

I came across the thought of different meaning that can be attributed to sentences if you place adjectives in different positions in it. So my question is do these sentences really differ somehow? &...
-4
votes
1answer
47 views

Why is "trigger warning" said like that

I know what is a "trigger warning" I wanted to know what trigger refers to in it Or if someone knows how the phrase developed to be used with the word trigger
0
votes
1answer
42 views

What is the difference in this similar sentences? [closed]

I came across this thinking: 1 - "the mayor of the city wants available house to homeless people" 2 - "the mayor of the city wants house available to homeless people" do they have ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Is there a special role in the word "out" in this sentence/phrase?

In the phrase/setence: "I can buy out of the back of a truck" I see the word "out" as an opitional in this sentence. I think the sentence would be clearer as: 1- "I can buy ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Very confusing sentence: "out back stacking wood"

I came across this: "Thought my old man was out back stacking wood" I actually don't know if a broader context is needed but to my it is a straight sentence and the reason this is confusing ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

What is the role of "a-" (a-Hyphen) before a word? [duplicate]

I have been a fan of pos-beatles individual members songs And in Paul Maccartney No More Loney Night's lyris I found this: 1 -"I can wait another day until I call you You've only got my heart on ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

What is the difference between "plunge" and "plunge down"?

In the headline: Keanu Reeves plunges down the rabbit hole again in The Matrix Resurrections what is the difference if I remove the "down" from "plunges down"? P.S.: this ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

What is the grammatical function of the words "symptom" and "distress" in the following sentence: "...hoping for a reduction in symptom distress."

The full sentence: People enter therapy hoping for a reduction in symptom distress. Is "symptom distress" a noun+noun pattern or a noun+verb? Is it like the pattern "fight club", ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Does "catch your breath" mean either "stop breathing" or "start breathing again"?

The 2 dictionaries gave the 2 opposite definitions catch your breath: ​to stop breathing for a moment because of fear, shock, etc. When he said he had resigned, I caught my breath in surprise. catch ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Should I use "inside the drawer" or "in the drawer" when I am talking about a small object?

When I was taking my English classes I came across a doubt: What's the proper way to say: I forgot my book in the drawer or inside the drawer?
0
votes
1answer
52 views

I can' contrive a scenario where what is stated in this text is logical

The text (from a NY Times article) is: These passages will allow you to convince yourself, and perhaps even your spouse, that your interest in getting wasted is an academic pursuit. Although I have ...
0
votes
3answers
96 views

Qutation marks in American English for emphasis and bracketing: single or double? [closed]

Suppose you write a mathematical text in American English that quotes from various sources (other literature and itself) and emphasizes and brackets stuff. You've already used up your font gimmicks (...
0
votes
0answers
70 views

is "about English second language teaching and learning" grammatical?

I came across the following sentence fragment: [1] about English second language teaching and learning I found this sentence fragment hard to understand, so I'd like to rephrase it to be clearer. ...
-1
votes
1answer
25 views

Are those two phrase/sentence holding same meaning? [closed]

is: "what chances are I have been cheated" similar to "what chances are I got cheated"??
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Comma after “viz.” in “viz.(,) that”?

Concerning the usage of “viz.” in American English, in ODO we find examples with and without the comma after “viz.” when a “that”-introduced clause follows: This leads many people towards the second, ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Comma in “i.e. that”

Consider the sentence: We claim that these sets are disjoint, i.e., 𝑋ᵢ ∩ 𝑋ⱼ = ∅ for different 𝑖,𝑗 ⩾ 0. A proofreader (from whom I can no longer get an answer) changed it: We claim that these ...
11
votes
4answers
3k views

“Let for each 𝑗” vs. “For each 𝑗 let”

I wrote Let for each 𝑗 < 𝑛 a permutation ℎ𝑗 : 𝐿 ↪ 𝐿 be given. A proofreader (whom I can no longer ask) changed it to For each 𝑗 < 𝑛, let a permutation ℎ𝑗 : 𝐿 ↪ 𝐿 be given. This ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

improved our comfort ride toilet

the text I came across: "We have improved our comfort ride toilet by adding a heated seat." "our comfort ride toilet" puzzles me because in my learning mind what make sense is: 1 - ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Comma before “and” separating two nontrivial items?

Consider the sentence The net simulates programs with at least 𝑓(𝑥) copies of each 𝑥 ⊆ 𝑆 with 𝜑(𝑥) (,) and exactly 𝑓(𝑥) copies of each 𝑥 ⊆ 𝑆 with 𝜓(𝑥). The parens around the comma mean ...
0
votes
2answers
28 views

Comma after a conditional clause in the middle of a sentence

The description of some algorithm (searching in a program-transition graph for a program state with certain properties) finishes with We return “true” if we find such a state(,) and “false” otherwise....
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Is the word "upon" dismissable in this text? [duplicate]

the text is: "The short answer is yes. Bootstrap doesn’t call themselves “the world’s most popular framework for building responsive, mobile-first sites” for nothing. On GitHub, Bootstrap ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Do I need to make sure I'm using a particular form of English?

English is my second language, but I'm practically bilingual. I consume a lot of American/British media, and I can somewhat distinguish their difference (accent is always a big giveaway, but I'm ...
0
votes
2answers
24 views

Comma before “and” separating two short independent math statements?

Consider a typical mathematical sentence defining two tuples: (s_i)_{i=1}^n and (t_i)_{i=1}^n: Let (s_i)_{i=1}^n = X (,) and (t_i)_{i=1}^n = Y. The parens around the comma mean that it's unclear ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

What is the definition of the following phrase?

the headline is: "Players and owners could keep negotiating, but with the sides still far apart, baseball has its first work stoppage since the 1994-95 strike." What is meant by "with ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Why does this definiton of 'depose' uses "to ask questions *of*"? [duplicate]

In the definition of "depose" in a juridic context I have found: To make a deposition; to give evidence in the shape of a deposition; to make statements that are written down and sworn to; ...
2
votes
1answer
265 views

Is there a difference between "artist" and "artiste"?

While we commonly use the word "artist" (for a person who knows any art), a lot of literary publications and even some news organisations spell the word as "artiste" - with an &...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

What does “congressional math” mean?

Can anyone explain to me the meaning of the phrase “congressional math”? Is it some kind of political slang? I’ve looked it up in all free dictionaries. The source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Spun it on me (AmE)

A group of friends is talking, and one of them says she is leaving the town for good. The rest show how sad they are and, after their affectionate words, the girl saying good-bye replies: Well, you ...
-3
votes
1answer
36 views

What do "tapped" and "checkered" mean in "...Brown was tapped to operate shelters in New York despite a checkered past..."? [closed]

The Headline is: Jack Brown was tapped to operate shelters in New York despite a checkered past, The New York Times found in a recent investigation. I can't figure out: "tapped" (although ...
-1
votes
1answer
43 views

TA (Abbreviation, AmE) [closed]

Context: in a book, two college girls are talking about their lives in a quite colloquial, friendly tone. One of them says: "I made out with my girl TA last week". Does anyone know what &...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Rewriting "Even the left hand doesn't need to know the tasks of right hand" to "... know the right's tasks"

The base sentence would be: Even the left hand doesn't need to know the tasks of right hand Can I rewrite this sentence, keeping the same gist and being grammatically acceptable, as: Even the left ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

"Match has been delayed/postponed for two days"."He has been jailed/punished for two years"

"Match has been delayed/postponed for two days"."He has been jailed/punished for two years" I need to ask whether "subject+has been+past participle+for two years" ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Meaning of "unravel" in "threatens to further unravel Africa’s second-most populous country"

The text is: An ethnically motivated campaign largely targeting Tigrayans threatens to further unravel Africa’s second-most populous country a year into civil war. If the definition of "unravel&...
0
votes
2answers
33 views

Should there be a preposition "of" between these words?

The text is: "It’s an expected move that comes as states have broadened access on their own and expands the number eligible by tens of millions." in the part: "the number eligible" ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Is there any difference between theses two phrases?

Say I'm driving a car and a colleague of mine sit in passenger seat says: 1 - slow your speed or 2 - slow your speed down is there any difference between these two? isn't the "down" ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Make sure he painted the room

Can we use "make sure" with past tense or past participle tense eg "make sure he painted the room" "make sure he had already painted the room when you left for london ...
-2
votes
1answer
40 views

Can't understand this part of the text

The text is: "The platonic ideal of Mac and Cheese Eric Kim’s new recipe, inspired by stouffer’s, delivers the same molten creaminess." the part that puzzles me is: "Mac and Cheese Eric ...

1
2 3 4 5
30