Questions tagged [american-english]

This tag is for questions specifically related to the English language as spoken and written in the USA. If you are interested in a difference between American English and British English, please use transatlantic-differences.

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3answers
20 views

Meaning of “take” at the beginning of a sentence

I couldn't understand the mechanism of a sentence from the book Born to Run by Christopher McDougall: when it comes to grabbing a spotlight and persuading people to do things they’d rather not, ...
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2answers
69 views

Why do we add an apostrophe to “gon'”?

English is not my native language, and I keep trying every day to develop my skills in it but I saw a new word of gon' instead of gone. And I keep wondering: why do we add an apostrophe to it? ...
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1answer
35 views

When cand I use “that is” or “to be”?

I am from Mexico, so English is not my first language. I'd like to know when can I say "that is" or "to be" because in Spanish is the same For instance: I want a room that is big in Spanish: Quiero ...
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2answers
44 views

Do you have or have you?

I am a English learner and I still don't understand why the auxiliary verb "to do" doesn't appear with the verb "to have". Is it wrong to say "She doesn't have brown hair"?
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8 views

correct usage/definition with sentence

He reached up and pressed an inviting looking red button, a sign lit up saying "Please do not press this button again." Would this example be considered a comma splice? Does it not require and then ...
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0answers
23 views

Correct comma usage in this example?

https://www.grammarly.com/blog/appositive/ When an appositive noun or noun phrase contains an essential element without which a sentence’s meaning would materially alter, do not frame it with commas. ...
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1answer
36 views

Dry up my clothes vs Dry my clothes

Is is it idiomatic to say: Dry up your clothes in the dryer after the washer is done spinning. I know dry up means to evaporate, in other words, if you dry your clothes up you're drying them till ...
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0answers
24 views

meaning of “bear someone home”

In the book "Native Speaker", there is "This means that you can get drunk, for the sake of building ambience and camaraderie (and for your own taut nerves), but still keep in mind that you haven't ...
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2answers
30 views

leave for having vs change for having

Are these idiomatic? if not, why? 2 coworkers are talking.... Person 1: I'm tired of working for other people. I wish I could have the money to start up my own business and be my own boss. Person ...
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1answer
34 views

“whose” vs “that its” in English

I'm an English learner and today I faced a question where I was supposed to fill in the missing blank. The question was: The large family _____ house had been destroyed by the storm was invited to ...
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1answer
34 views

in the team vs. on the team

In AmE, you only use the proposition 'on' with nouns that refer to groups of people ('team', 'board', 'commission', etc). Am I right? Can I use 'in' without sounding like a weirdo or, at least, a ...
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9 views

Elliptical structured confusing English

1.She believed to have been killed in somewhere in frontline -->>: For me it should be written in like "She is believed 'who' have been killed in somewhere in frontline" 2. After the peace treaty ...
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3answers
39 views

Before/In front of

I'd like to know if "before" and "in front of" is equally common in a sentence like this in American English? Is one more formal than the other? Elina stands before/in front of a vending machine, ...
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1answer
29 views

Is “to ease” the same as “could ease”?

Found this article online and the title is: China-U.S. trade war to ease but conflicts will persist - former finance minister But then the person is quoted of saying "could ease". Are the two ...
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2answers
49 views

How can I describe the position the man sits in in the picture?

How can I describe the position the man is sitting in in the picture? Are either of these good: A man is sitting hunched over on a chair, resting his elbows on his thighs. A man is sitting leaning ...
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1answer
67 views

Is the phrase “You can cancel a subscription anytime” correct?

One native speaker said that it is a mistake to use the indefinite article in the phrase "You can cancel a subscription anytime". I want to ask native speakers if it's true, and if yes — what rule ...
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1answer
28 views
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26 views

“It is done” what is the sentence structure?

It is done Is "done" in the above sentence an adjunctive or a verb? Or is it a simple past tense in passive form. If so why "is" is used. Please clarify what is the structure of the sentence. This ...
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1answer
13 views

context of a phrase in a sentence

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/89892/clause-vs-phrase-vs-sentence A phrase cannot be used as a stand-alone utterance, e.g. "reading a book" is a phrase. However, with proper intonation ...
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50 views

Is “serves” a verb or noun in this complex sentence? (“…and serves as a tool for communication…“)

Project scheduling provides a detailed plan that represents how and when the project will deliver the products, services, and results defined in the project scope and serves as a tool for ...
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1answer
39 views

How should I politely say “I hope I can receive recognition”?

That is used to apply to a university program and I want to politely say that I hope I can enter your program. Should that be I hope I could receive your recognition. or I hope I would/...
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1answer
25 views

What's the “payday-loan”? [closed]

I encountered the word at the title reading this article, saying, (Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Pocket Cast or ...
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1answer
31 views

can someone pleas check is it correct usage of “as well as”? [closed]

"I am a young, passionate, just graduated from university developer. Looking for a dream team where I could get challenging tasks, interesting experience, new friends and an ...
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2answers
130 views

Correct error in perfect tense

I'm self-studying English and in an exercise I'm asked to correct the errors in perfect tense of a series of sentences. One of them is the following Supposing they would have got married, wouldn't ...
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1answer
82 views

If I learn British English, should I stop talking with Americans?

I had the opportunity to speak with several native speakers, It's fun, and they learn my native language, the problem is that several of my language partners speak with an American accent and the ...
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1answer
34 views

Transport as a noun in American English

“Sam took a transport to mother’s house”. For a matter of style I want to use the word transport or transportation as a synonym of vehicle, but for American readers. I read that in AE transport is ...
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1answer
13 views

Meaning of “They were meant to have them”?

There are five pups. One for each of the stark children. The direwolf is a sigil of your house. They were meant to have them. Can you please explain the meaning of "They were meant to have them"?
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1answer
39 views

Is there really a difference between the use of will and shall?

Shall I open the door? Will I open the door? So far as I know , the first sentence means will you allow me to open the door? The second question means Will I have the ability to open the door? (...
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1answer
22 views

In present-day reality no-one actually uses classical Latin any more.Why can we use “Classical Latin uses the ablative” in present tense?

What is the difference between (a) and (b) (a)"Classical Latin uses the ablative" (b)"Classical Latin used the ablative"
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When teachers introduce the outdated theory(for example:Classical element) to students,should teachers use present tense or past tense to describe it?

Example: 1(a)Classical element comprises the simplest substances,namely earth, water, air, fire and Aether. 1(b)Classical element comprised the simplest substances,namely earth, water, air, fire and ...
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1answer
25 views

“Survivors clinging to a raft.” Is this sentence right?

"Survivors clinging to a raft." There is no verb in this sentence. I know this sentence is not the present progressive/present continuous. But can this sentence be used independently? I found this ...
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2answers
37 views

I am unintersted / disinterested in English?

I am uninterested in English. I am disinterested in English. Some grammar books say that the use of disinterested is wrong in the context as it means unbiased or impartial But Michael Swan in ...
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1answer
60 views

How do you make the flap t sound as in the words city and letter

I'm having a hard time figuring out the right placement and motions of the tongue when making this consonant. I watched a few videos on this topic. People say that in order to make the sound you don't ...
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0answers
15 views

Is “the + every/each/always + noun” used?

I met this structure at my TOEIC tests, but I couldn't remember the whole sentence. Is this a kind of structure used formally? I've never met this before.
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1answer
23 views

Has gone vs is visiting

What is difference between these two examples below, and why? .1 Alex isn't here. She is visiting her mother. .2 Alex isn't here. She has gone to visit her mother.
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1answer
14 views

Is the “are” in this sentence ungrammatical?

Is the “are” in this sentence ungrammatical? ​‎How do you feel about some people are calling you "Toma-chan" in Japan?
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0answers
75 views

How do you say 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 in word form? [duplicate]

I was reading a book called “BOMB” and the number 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 and I wanted to know what this number is in word form (how you say the word).
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1answer
91 views

The meaning of “of course,” “sure” when you thank someone

Sometimes I thank a person from USA and he responds, "Sure," "of course." I don't know what their meaning in this context, so could anyone give me their meaning?
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2answers
27 views

what's difference about these two sentence?

sentence 1: The House would initiate a formal impeachment inquiry against President Trump, charging him with betraying his oath of office and the nation’s security by seeking to enlist a foreign ...
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1answer
24 views

In my sentence can I add a comma to the word before?

I want to know if adding a comma before the word "before" would be correct or not. I had been struggling to find partners for three years before I found the best partners who helped me to learn ...
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1answer
51 views

Is “easier than before” used in everyday English?

I want to know if "easier than before" is correct in my sentence or not, and how I can say something makes things better than before. For example. "Our smartphones make learning languages easier ...
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1answer
63 views

What is the difference between I love flowers vs I love the flowers

I want to know what is the difference between these two examples: I love flowers so much! I love the flowers in my garden so much!
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1answer
40 views

Can we use past simple without giving the exact time?

Can we use past simple without giving the exact time. For example. 'I will tell you how I learned English through self-study.'
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1answer
40 views

Difference between not and don't in the next sentence [closed]

“In the period we not enter, Romanticism, the Account became the preeminent formula for literary production.” In the sentence above, does the ‘not’ make sense? Should I use ‘don’t’ instead?
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95 views

What is the difference between “to be Ving” and “to V”?

For example, (1)You are too young to be contemplating retirement. (2)You are too young to contemplate retirement.
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1answer
27 views

What is the difference between “the+singular countable noun” and “zero article+plural countable noun”

What is the difference between "the + singular countable noun" and "zero article + plural countable noun" when we make generalisations about classes of things.
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1answer
26 views

Question on English grammar structure

Apple Inc. is subject to tax charge according to the law of the state of California. Apple Inc. is subject to the tax charge according to the law of the state of California. Apple Inc. is subject ...
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1answer
51 views

How to read month/day/year in an American way?

British people would say "I have a meeting on the 8th day of Sep in 2019." I guess American would say "I have a meeting on Sep 8, 2019." But how to read "on Sep 8, 2019" in a natural way?
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1answer
37 views

help for sentence analysis

the conveying to an employee of unconditional entitlement to a share in a pension fund (Source: https://www.google.com/search?q=vesting+definition&rlz=1CAVNXA_enUS854&oq=vesting&aqs=...
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1answer
15 views

Confusion in usage of “of” in a sentence

I read the below statement today. "Muhammad Ali was born in the small town of Louisville." Here Louisville is described as a small town. Normally when we use "small town of XXX", are we ...