Questions tagged [american-english]

This tag is for questions specifically related to the English language as spoken and written in the USA. If you are interested in a difference between American English and British English, please use transatlantic-differences.

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Am I expected to add more or further thoughts following indeed?

Is it proper to reply “Indeed!” to agree with someone on some opinion? Am I expected to add more or further thoughts following indeed? (I remember seeing such advice somewhere, and can't find it. But ...
Tim's user avatar
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What should a room in a hospital where nurses dress wounds of patients be called?

Bing's dictionary (which in turn is based on some Oxford dictionary) says that verb dress has this sense: clean, treat, or apply a dressing to (a wound): "she washed the wound and dressed it ...
Tim's user avatar
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-1 votes
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What's this linguistic, phonetic or phonologic phenomenon called?

I was enjoying the relaxing vibes that the hotel provided. When Americans say the above sentence, do they sometimes say "vibes that" as "vibesat"? Does it also happen in other ...
Tim's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
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What's the word similar to jittery in spelling or pronunciation, but means some privately-run transportation by small vehicles?

What's the word similar to jittery in spelling or pronunciation, but means some privately-run transportation by small vehicles? For example, there are such transportation services going to New York ...
Tim's user avatar
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I found out that a new restaurant has opened

On the way home from work, Sarah noticed a new restaurant a couple of blocks from her house. When she came home, she said to her husband: 1. I found out that a new restaurant has opened in our ...
prof1589's user avatar
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Is this mixed conditional used correctly? “What would you have done if you inherited a large amount of money?”

I am an English teacher abroad. Few days ago I used a structure to make a mixed conditional question. I was told the sentence was incorrect as the condition is in the present while the effect is in ...
Sepideh Abghari's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
32 views

In which cases can't "whether" be used?

Why can't I use whether in this sentence? However we have just found a student who is willing to manage the section whether the website is still active next year.
Elizabeth's user avatar
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1 vote
6 answers
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What is the difference between American and British English on "garden" and "yard"?

(Source: https://www.eyre-design.co.uk/garden-design/back-gardens/) After I have done my research, this is what I understand. Have a look at the picture above. British will say "front/back yard&...
Tom's user avatar
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What does "brought his chair on four legs" mean?

Pine Billy brought his chair down on four legs and spit in the fire and studied the logs a minute. What does the part in bold mean? The Education of Little Tree by Forest Carter There's more context ...
inviolable's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
2k views

Differences in Usage: 'Cellphone' vs. 'Mobile Phone' in English

I've often come across two terms that seem to refer to the same device but are used differently: "cellphone" and "mobile phone." I'm curious about the differences in the usage of ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
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Is "tartar" more common than "scale" in dentistry?

According to my study, some British people say "a buildup of scale on my teeth" and both British and American people say "a buildup of tartar on my teeth". The British also say &...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
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Understanding the Distinction Between 'Goal' and 'Target' in English

As a non-native English speaker, I often encounter the words 'goal' and 'target'. While they appear to be used interchangeably in some contexts, I suspect there might be subtle differences in their ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
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1 answer
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phrase as alternative to "I'm scared of being here"?

I want to know if I could strike a more formal tone as an alternative to "I'm scared of being here" like: 1 - "I'm in fear to be here" or "I'm feared to be here" are ...
Giliarda Freitas's user avatar
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2 answers
44 views

Can "thank you for the laptop" mean the same as "thank you for fixing the laptop"?

The title pretty much covers it. The context is Person A has finished fixing the laptop and the Person B expresses gratitude for the job in a casual way. I consulted with ChatGPT, and it said the ...
not a native speaker but tryin's user avatar
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1 answer
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"Within 7 working days upon arrival" vs. "of your arrival date"

Two questions Is there any difference between the sentence "within 7 working days upon arrival" and "within 7 working of your arrival date"? How do we count these 7 working days? ...
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What does "within 15 minutes of either the opening or closing of classes" mean?

I came across this sentence: It is illegal to pass another vehicle in a school area, within 15 minutes of either the opening or closing of classes or at any time when children are on the school ...
SmoothPoop69's user avatar
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Is it correct to say "tell me the location I need to go to to get the document"?

Is it correct to say tell me the location I need to go to to get the document or do I have to say tell me the location I need to go to get the document?
SmoothPoop69's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
201 views

Do we say "put" a rental bike shop?

I can't come up with anything better than to set up a (specialist) shop in an area. Imagine a park up in the mountains where kids could do MTB (mountain biking?) a place that is accessible but lacking ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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Questions about verbs

70% (700) of the total data is used as training data, and the remaining 20% (200) are used as validation data. I am in the process of creating presentation PPT materials. Is are used as correct in ...
seo hyun's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
3k views

An American expression for "a packet of crisps"

According to the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, it seems that this is called "a packet of crisps" (Lognman | crisp), but the same dictionary says that "packet" is ...
Kaguyahime's user avatar
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2 answers
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Is it grammatical to say "Here is very nice?"

There is a question that comes across to me--the word 'here' is a noun as well an adverb. Based on these two sentences: I like it here. I like here. Here is the book that you are looking for. The word ...
WONG QI XIAN Moe's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
84 views

can i start a sentence after a preposition? [closed]

I just want to make sure that I can start a sentence after a preposition. because I have seen some sentences that were started with prepositions like this In the closet is where I keep the dog food. ...
Sammed's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
61 views

Using words "not" and "until" in the same sentence

For example, let's say someone said to me, "You did not need to wait until I was in the pool to hold me". I believe this can translate to something like, "You did not need to wait to ...
Max's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
297 views

If I want to use an infinitive as an adverb in the sentence then I can use an infinitive with any verb as an adverb?

If I want to use an infinitive as an adverb in the sentence then can I use it with any verb or specific verb? suppose I want to say " I went there to drive the car" so here to drive the car ...
Sammed's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
131 views

What is the meaning of "Not actually"?

For example, let's say Person A says "1 plus 1 is 3". Then Person B can either say "It's not 3, it's 2" or "It's actually 2". What if Person B says "It's not ...
Max's user avatar
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2 answers
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Why 'are getting' at sentence 'I'm sorry to hear that your parents are getting divorced.'? [closed]

Book Destination C1&C2, page 6: Write the verb in brackets in the correct form, present simple or present continuous, in each gap: I'm sorry to hear that your parents __________ (get) divorced. ...
Vy Do's user avatar
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12 votes
4 answers
5k views

The slang term for books made of paper

What is slang for a book that has pages made of paper; the opposite of an ebook? I used to know. It's something like "tree book", which I know is wrong, but I can't come up with anything ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
71 views

What are the various meanings of the expression "North America"?

My understanding is that anglophones take it to mean any of the following depending on context: Canada and the U.S.: by far the most common usage in most contexts, the default definition. Canada, the ...
Qwokker's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
116 views

The way I phrase questions seems to confuse native English speakers

I am an Indian, so the English I speak is more closer to British English than American English. And this particular way I phrase questions seems to confuse Americans more than Britishers from what I ...
Aditya's user avatar
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1 answer
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What does "squeeze along" mean in this sentence?

It was not intended that we should have such a hard time getting a living, that we should just manage to squeeze along, to get together a few comforts, to spend about all of our time making a living ...
Saeed Vrz's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
34 views

"Shutdown Holdouts" meaning

I came across this in the New York Times: "How the Shutdown Holdouts Have Antagonized McCarthy Before." The first sentence says: "Most of the House Republicans who voted against ...
Giliarda Freitas's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
77 views

Is it more fitting to say, "I left two comments on the page" or "I made two comments"?

Which is more appropriate "I left two comments on the page yesterday" or "I made two comments on the page yesterday" Context: The page contains some changes to be reviewed by ...
pensee's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
46 views

Are imperfectly constructed sentences understandable? [closed]

As an English learner, when building a sentence in my head it is almost impossible to get it out idiomatically. For example, before I knew the word "regarding" I built this sentence: "...
Giliarda Freitas's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
101 views

How to ask to let you pass in the bus

For example, you are sitting near the window on the bus. A person sits next to you and blocks the passage (not on purpose). And here is your stop and you need to get out. How to ask politely to let ...
user486193's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
350 views

Difference between 'gamer' and 'player'?

I saw a sentence today: Back in the last century, gamers were sometimes known to take advantage of players with slow (as in dialup) links; an opponent could be eliminated literally before he or she ...
kokomi's user avatar
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7 votes
9 answers
8k views

What do Americans say instead of “can’t be bothered”?

I want to know the American version of “I can’t be bothered.” I heard that Americans don’t use this phrase that much. I’ve been googling this and all I get are phrases like “I couldn’t care less” and “...
BosonFermion's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
34 views

"granular level" for image

I'm writing a scientific paper about image processing. Before I study the image whose resolution is 30, and now I want to study image whose resolution is 500. I want to write this sentence "Now I ...
wxystudio's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
123 views

encompass, include, incorporate

I want to write a scientific paper, the sentence is "remote sensing technology encompasses two primary methods". I'm not sure which one should I use: encompass, include, or incorporate? I've ...
wxystudio's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
51 views

Using the word "waver" for moving away from diet

Context: Chatting with a friend on Whatsapp. We both were following a diet plan, but today I didn't commit to it due to a family occasion. How do I communicate this properly: "Today went well, ...
pensee's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
381 views

Exercise book vs. Composition book

As far as I know, in United States students don't use exercise books. Image 1. Exercise book They use composition books instead, which often have "marble" cover and bound through the fold. ...
jsx97's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
585 views

British or American For IELTS/TOEFL

Which one (British or American) is better for IELTS exam? What about TOEFL? I'm lerning American, is it essantial to learn British or not?
English Lerner's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
43 views

to flip the phrase around and keep the same gist?

is that grammatically accepted to flip: 1.0 "of just enhancing the film they used a lot of technology" as 2.0 "they used a lot of technology of just enhancing the film" I believe ...
Giliarda Freitas's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

"Was/were" and "would be/would have been"

If this ... (was/were) the case, the movie ... (would be/would have been) much better. The context is that I am sending my friend a video of a movie trailer (not released yet), and it has some funny ...
what's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
53 views

is this an example of acts as a prepositional phrase?

watching this interview posted on YouTube yesterday with Paul McCartney: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21pcVuPHoek from 7:26 Paul McCartney says: "I owe it to him and his team who were briliant ...
Giliarda Freitas's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

I have a Big Essay coming up. I need some help. The question is "Do we say Where she works or Where she is working?" These two are correct but its [closed]

I have a Big Essay coming up. I need some help. The question is "Do we say Where she works or Where she is working?" These two are correct but they're given as different answers. There is no ...
mirjam lindgerd's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
119 views

British idioms in America

There is a question I asked a lot of people about that and everyone answered differently. Can I use British idioms in America or in front of an American citizen? Because some beautiful idioms are ...
Sajjad Khorrami's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
123 views

ESOL teacher claims present perfect equals s-form

A person I know learns English as a second language. The teacher introduced some basic grammar concepts, mostly simple present, past, and future. For some reason, he introduced present perfect as well....
Sebastian's user avatar
  • 147
3 votes
1 answer
30 views

Present Perfect vs Present Perfect continuous in this situation

"I've worked here all my life" gives the feeling that is the activity of working is intended to be stopped soon, and "I've been working here here all my life" gives the feeling ...
Izumi Shinichi's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
92 views

using "willing" in negative form

I built this sentence: "I was going to go for a run after waking up from the nap, but I didn't feel willing." and my English teacher said I should use "...didn't feel motivated" or ...
evanilda lidantown's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
215 views

Looks like British people say "They're at the cinema." Don't Americans say "They're at cinema"?

I have seen a difference in the use of "the" between UK and US and that is in the word hospital, is it the same in the word cinema? I'm in the hospital (US) I'm in hospital (UK) They're at ...
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar

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