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Questions tagged [american-english]

This tag is for questions specifically related to the English language as spoken and written in the USA. If you are interested in a difference between American English and British English, please use transatlantic-differences.

2
votes
2answers
88 views

I noticed something was going on vs I sensed something was going on

Can I use "I sensed" meaning "I noticed" as synonyms in this phrase? Example: I noticed/sensed something was going on when my father said that my mother wasn't going to come home that night. ...
-1
votes
1answer
17 views

Get stains out of the sink vs Remove stains from the sink?

Are both of these phrases grammatically correct? I need to get those stains out of the sink. I need to remove those stains from the sink.
1
vote
1answer
349 views

What is the meaning of this phrase - “So take aim and fire away” in Alan Walker's 'On My Way'? [closed]

So take aim and fire away I've never been so wide awake No, nobody but me can keep me safe And I'm on my way
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Cut me off vs passed me

Let's say you're running a marathon and someone catches up, runs faster than you, and wins the run at the last minute. Did the person who catch up to you and won the marathon passed you while you ...
1
vote
1answer
14 views

Match up (with) vs Match

I've looked in the dictionary about the meaning of these 2 words, but I can still not process how they're different. For example, when should I use up? If the word match up means the same as match ...
-1
votes
1answer
21 views

Meaning of “Voice going crazy on this hook like a whirlwind?”

What is the meaning of this phrase: Voice going crazy on this hook like a whirlwind? It's from the song called Boyfriend. In context, the lyrics say: Girlfriend, girlfriend, I could be you ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

Does anyone know how to distinguish between (1) [ Subject(plural) + are + Object(plural) ] and (2) [ Subject(plural) + are + a/an Object(singular) ]?

For example: Computers are important research tools Computers are an important research tool. Does anyone know how to distinguish between (1) and (2)?
0
votes
1answer
75 views

Filled with energy vs full of energy

Is it fine to say "I'm filled with energy" instead of "I'm full of energy"?
1
vote
1answer
27 views

I'm not so much of a drinker

Is this idiomatic? I'm not so much of a drinker, so when I get out I always look for good service and cheap food.
3
votes
5answers
90 views

American pronunciation of “second” (edited)

I'm learning American English with some online classes, and the instructor says that the 2nd vowel 'o' of "second" sounds like "/e/" in everyday conversation (e.g. "Can I talk to you for a second?"). ...
3
votes
1answer
579 views

Do British people often use the word lightning conductor?

Do British people use the word lightning conductor more frequently than a lightning rod?
0
votes
1answer
47 views

I was having a bath with my glasses wore/wearing?

I want say a sentence like: I was having a bath with my glasses wore/wearing I've definitely come cross similar structure like this, with my stuff + past simple(or perhaps past participle). Hopefully ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

“Cause unwholesome inspiration and impact on viewers”

So I have this sentence, and I don't know if you can say "cause" or if I should replace it with another word. Thank you, thegirlinneedofhelp
0
votes
2answers
21 views

Which is the correct way to say it “who are you spending it with?” Or “whom are you spending it with?”

As per the grammar rules, if "I" is the subject of the sentence then the other person must the object. And generally whom is used in the objective form but in this case the prior format is more common ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

subordinate conjunction usage

He was originally from Spain but moved to London in the UK, since his move to London, he has established an export business selling fruit. Do we view the prepositional sentence as subordinate as a ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Sit in for(is it common?)

https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/sit-in-for to take the place of someone temporarily I’ll be sitting in for the secretary at/on the meeting tonight. Is the use ...
1
vote
2answers
38 views

Does “I shouldn't have let you do it.” “shouldn't have + past participle” or “shouldn't + present perfect”

In the movie "Frame", 1947, Glen Ford, in one dialog there is: "I shouldn't have let you do it." Does "I shouldn't have let you do it." grammatically means: A) shouldn't have + past participle or B) ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

“public transport” vs. “public transportation”

Buses are the main form of public transportation Buses are the main form of public transport Which one is correct?
0
votes
1answer
13 views

Waiting your comments how to use with verb on below sentence

Q. I ____ john and Liz after school tomorrow. A. am meet B. am meeting C. met Q2. My sister ____ john and Liz after school tomorrow. A. Is meet B. Is meeting C. met ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Having a moment (interjecting?)

https://www.urbandictionary.com/author.php?author=Labr4t Here is the use of "have a moment" natural?( apart from its other meanings)? The phrase 'Having a moment' should be used whenever a ...
3
votes
1answer
29 views

It is so lovely a day

I know "such a lovely day" is definitely correct, but what do you think of "it's so lovely a day"? Is it okay as well? This part of an exercise I did in FCE use of English, 'it's so lovely day' is ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Correct usage with conjunctions

The performer died after falling ill on stage. This was thought by the audience to be a part of the act, until emergency services were called in, the audience was evacuated, and he was declared dead ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

What's the American version of “fellow member”?

Fellow member means: Someone who is a member of the same organization or society as you. Collins Dictionary The dictionary states that it means that in British, so what is its exact synonym in ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Third person verbs are always conjugated?

Sometimes I see third person verbs , though they're not conjugated. Examples: I fell my sorrow Fly away; enter This makes my blood Boil; Or, they aren't really verbs? Plz help me.
1
vote
3answers
23 views

Climbed on/climbed over the sidewalk

A person who was just learning to drive, by mistake climbed on the sidewalk a bit. (The car gets inclined as the two tyres on one side climb the sidewalk.) So what would be used: I climbed over ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

“Fine and you” vs “Fine how about you?”

It always sounds weird to me when I hear people say "I'm fine AND you" when I ask how they're doing. It doesn't sound natural to me, and it isn't something I hear in the US every day. I hear it ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

type of usage with finite clauses

I heard this song played on the radio. I heard this song (finite clause) So 'I heard this song' feels like it requires more information alone, but you could say it in speech or: I heard this song....
4
votes
2answers
52 views

“Grow out of clothes”

Is "grow out of clothes" used only for "kids who grow bigger and can't fit in their earlier clothes"? Or can it be used for anyone who has put on some weight(like adults). Like a lady says: I can'...
29
votes
6answers
7k views

Is “plugging out” electronic devices an American expression?

Are these valid in American English as opposed to "unplug". Plug out the charger from the wall. I plugged out my TV. I found my radio plugged out. I started hanging out with some guys ...
2
votes
2answers
58 views

She’s always on me

In a novel "Dead Beautiful " by Yvonne Woon a guy tells Renée about the lady who punished her: “Lynch loves watching people squirm. She’s always on me for having too much facial hair.” I couldn't ...
1
vote
3answers
69 views

Why “Your father just told me” would not be “Your father told me” without “just”

In Oscar a 1991 American slapstick crime comedy film directed by John Landis, I heard: "Your father just told me". Here answer was: native speaker often omit, here it is "has" Your father has just ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is “Reports” in the sentence below without the article “The”?

Why is "Reports" in sentence below without "The"? Reports are coming in that a train has crashed near Birmingham. This sentence is copied from the book How English Works by Michael Swam and ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

“Going up” instead of “put up” [closed]

The posters are going up all over the town. Is "going up" used more commonly in this context? Or is this one more likely to be said: The poster are being put up all over the town. So which one ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Why does the dictionary explain that verbs begin with “to” ? what does “to” mean here?

Example: abandon to leave someone, especially someone you are responsible for what does "to" mean here?
0
votes
2answers
31 views

Do a subject at a university (is it used in AE as well?)

"Do a subject" means "studying a subject". But the Dictionaries said it is used in the UK. So my question is whether it is used in AE? So is this use common in America,is it used? Like: I did ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Make/score a goal (AmE)

What is more common in AE? He made a goal. He scored a goal. So is "made" or "score" used in soccer? I mean which one is more common?
1
vote
1answer
26 views

Drive in the wrong lane or wrong side

What is more common in America: You're driving in the wrong lane. Or You're driving on the wrong side (of the road) Here is the car driving in the wrong lane or on the wrong side? And what ...
1
vote
2answers
84 views

Mixing up British and American English

Is it acceptable nowadays to use both types of spelling in writing? I have a tendency to mix up American and British English. This is because most of the South Asians have learned English in two ...
0
votes
2answers
28 views

The battery is 34% charged(or is 34% ), the battery decreased by 4%

If the battery percentage indicator shows "34%", what will a natural way to express this idea? My phone's battery is 34%.. My phone's battery is 34% charged. Should "charge" be added in the ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Well,he's last or coming in last (while the race is still going on)

My Aunt called up to ask me where my cousin was in the race.(She couldn't come to see it). The race was still going on so I tell her his current position, so what should I use: He's first/second/...
0
votes
1answer
108 views

Difference between who are you? & who you are

I am in confused that When I ask to unknown person, then how to ask: Who are you? or Who you are.. Other examples: What is he doing? or what he is doing.. How are you? or how you are.. What is the ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

How to know when is passive, when is an adjective?

In these two sentences "tired" is always adjective: I was tired. I have been tired. In these two sentences "told" is always part of the passive, perfect participle: I was told. I have been told. ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Are these common in America?

https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/talk-down [talk someone down] BRITISH to talk loudly so that other people cannot hear what someone is saying [talk someone down] INFORMAL ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

When is that not dependent

Dependent clauses include clauses that may begin with that, who, whom, whose, which, where, when, and why. (Judy Hopkins -- Sentence Variety) That can begin a complete sentence though correct? It's ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Why grammarly.com did remove comma here “They have just discovered a new fuel - it's half the price of petrol, and much cleaner.”

In "How English Works" page 172, 16 "They have just discovered a new fuel - it's half the price of petrol, and much cleaner." Why grammarly.com remove comma after petrol: "They have just discovered a ...
2
votes
2answers
64 views

What is correct “Your father just told me” or “Your father has just told me.”

In Oscar a 1991 American slapstick crime comedy film directed by John Landis, I heard: "Your father just told me". Why do not correct to say "Your father has just told me."? Because in "How English ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Put money on (mutual funds,health insurance etc) to mean invest

Is it natural to say: I put some money on mutual funds. I put some money on health insurance.(or any other insurance) Is the use of "put some money on" natural? Like: I invested in mutual ...
14
votes
3answers
3k views

Why do we use the plural of movies in this phrase “We went to the movies last night.”?

I found this sentence: We went to the movies last night. at the following URL: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/movies Why do they use the plural "movies", why not use the ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

How can I improve my pronunciation of the flap t sound?

I am a non native speaker from Europe (my native language is Slovenian) and I'm trying to improve my English accent and pronunciation but I'm struggling with the flap t sound. I can pronounce it in ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Why I understand A.J.Hoge 100% but CNN 20% only?

I am no native speaker. I have been reading an English book lot since 1970. Last 3.5 years I have been listening to A.J.Hoge and CNN. I have understood A.J. Hoge from the beginning and today I ...