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Questions tagged [american-english]

This tag is for questions specifically related to the English language as spoken and written in the USA. If you are interested in a difference between American English and British English, please use transatlantic-differences.

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35 views

how many friends do you get to meet there?

Is this correct way to ask a question to a person who went to party function, there he wanted to meet his friends?
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87 views

“Cavaliers are”, “Lakers are”, “Knicks are” etc. VS “Cavaliers is”, “Lakers is”, “Knicks is” etc. (American English)

As far as I know, in American English, we can see singular team names as either plural or singular. So, "Golden State are the best team in the NBA" and "Golden State is the best team in the NBA" are ...
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2answers
41 views

Why five day and not five days?

Why here is "five day": I follow the Effortless English five day training method. and why here is "five days": I practice every unit for at least five days.
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2answers
38 views

Which of the two sentences is correct? If both are, which one is better?

I want to know which sentence is better of the two? I am not in mood to do debate. I am not in a mood to debate.
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259 views

Is there a usage like “feel done” in English?

I saw a sentence like: "Have you ever felt done by blablablah?" What does it mean?
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1answer
16 views

Work out at/come out at

Do the phrasal verbs in the title only mean "to add up"? Or can they mean "any mathematical calculation"? Like: This price works out at(comes out at) $30 per week. Or should it only be: The ...
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1answer
53 views

How does a phrase differ from a clause

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/price_is_right Is this a phrase or clause. How do they differ aside from active verb. A group of words that is part of, rather than the whole of, a sentence A phrase ...
2
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1answer
120 views

Pronunciation of the second /k/ in “excuse”?

The "p" in "application" is unaspirated and the "p" in "apply" is aspirated since it is the first letter in the stressed syllable, am I right? When an unvoiced stop is the first letter of a stressed ...
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1answer
69 views

Is it possible to pronounce jury as /dʒɜːri/?

sometimes I hear Americans pronounce jury as ''/dʒɜːri/''. Is that right? Is it regional or generally they say this way?
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1answer
32 views

How to write : someone who don't or doesn't?

Please help me to understand. My full sentence is "... as someone who don't/ doesn't only love his...". I have already tried them both and both sounds right.
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1answer
34 views

“public transport” vs. “public transportation”

Buses are the main form of public transportation Buses are the main form of public transport Which one is correct?
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1answer
86 views

It's a few weeks off/away

If something is just going to happen,is it common to use "off"? Like: It's just a few weeks off.( Like something, well anything could be used instead of "it's " ,to mean that thing is just a ...
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1answer
94 views

Dropping auxiliary verbs when asking questions

I hear many native speakers dropping auxiliary verbs when asking questions. For instance, I hear them saying "How you doing?". Another example that came up to my ear recently: in the gym, I hear many ...
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1answer
103 views

Which is more natural English: “I don't know what the cause is” or “I don't know what is the cause”?

I don't know what the cause is. I don't know what is the cause. and do you have any difference between these sentences. if you have, could you explain it. e.g. 1) is for writing, 2) is for speaking
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1answer
157 views

To + (verb) as infinitive/gerund

I have a question on preposition ‘to’. When we use verb after ‘to’ we use either infinitives or verb in ing format but my question is: will the word ‘to’ be a preposition in both the case? also, ...
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1answer
33 views

Past participle usage in below sentences / passives

I hope all the below form of sentences give ‘Passive’ meanings, am I correct? 1) be + verb3 [i.e. past participle] be prepared. 2) being + verb3 being processed (but in continuous form). 3) ...
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1answer
37 views

Usage of “that only X can"

Is this sentence correct? Who said that only girls can believe in fairies? Specifically, do you think that the use of "that, only, can" make the sentence a little bit weird? Or is it fine?
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1answer
13 views

Waiting your comments how to use with verb on below sentence

Q. I ____ john and Liz after school tomorrow. A. am meet B. am meeting C. met Q2. My sister ____ john and Liz after school tomorrow. A. Is meet B. Is meeting C. met ...
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1answer
27 views

Reflexive pronoun vs pronoun

Which one is correct? He engraved photos of himself and his wife on the coins. Or He engraved photos of him and his wife on the coins.
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1answer
12 views

Comparison by 'as'

I have two questions and both of them can be solved by the same concept then I want to say that the 'explanation of second sentence is same as first sentence'. Is it correct, can I say this? or should ...
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1answer
33 views

is he's / she's + name a correct sentence?

Is it correct to include a name right after a he's or she's? It would define fully written in: ''He is John'' or ''She is Maria'' but it somehow just sounds wrong or impolite to me.
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1answer
47 views

Is the word liberal used properly in this sentence

A friend once told me, when you're lost you're liberal and when you're liberal you can go anywhere Is "liberal" used properly here?
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1answer
25 views

Type of clause and correct usage in this example

It follows two sisters— one is devoted to her faith, the other breaks the community's strict rules. What would we class this type of clause ? (one is this, the other is this) What part is the main ...
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1answer
93 views

Is “which is directly affecting our operational duties” correct in this sentence? Should it be “which are” instead?

Is the following sentence correct: I would like to point upcoming events in Week 19, which is directly affecting our operational duties. I think it should be "which are", and the verb affect ...
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1answer
87 views

Is it an adverb clause, a relative clause or a noun clause?

Is it an adverb clause, a relative clause or a noun clause? "To get to New Zealand the fastest way" The whole sentence is... To get to New Zealand the fastest way, you will have to fly from ...
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1answer
5k views

Any time and Any day in english

1) Can we use ‘any time’ instead of ‘any day’ in the below example? "Have you seen this any day before?" Can you please tell me what the difference is between ‘any time’ and ‘any day’? 2) Answer ...
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1answer
28 views

No possessive pronoun in '[first name] and family' OK in US English?

Is the following OK in US English: "Fred lent Tony money for the downpayment on an apartment so that Tony and family could have their own place to live." Or would I need to add 'his' before 'family',...
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1answer
64 views

How to introduce a widow who is not a widow?

I am looking for a way to introduce a mother, who believes she is a widow in a logline in a way that the reader understands that she is not a widow. The long version would be: "A widow, who is unaware ...
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1answer
34 views

Restrictive or Non-Restrictive Use of Which?

Religion is a personal or institutionalized set of attitudes, beliefs and practices, which may include a system of prayers and religious laws. In the preceding sentence, is 'which' restrictive or ...
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1answer
129 views

In the long run, right will out

There is a common proverb in our language which says: "Always someone who's right and has the right, will achieve it because it was his / her right." The only equivalent I found is: In the long ...
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1answer
927 views

What do you have to say for yourself? / What have you got to say for yourself?

Which of below is American and which is British English when you want someone to explain themselves? What do you have to say for yourself? What have you got to say for yourself?
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1answer
21 views

Meaning of “Voice going crazy on this hook like a whirlwind?”

What is the meaning of this phrase: Voice going crazy on this hook like a whirlwind? It's from the song called Boyfriend. In context, the lyrics say: Girlfriend, girlfriend, I could be you ...
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0answers
5 views

usage with phrases

Some polls showed the party could win just seven per cent of the vote - their lowest share in history. Some polls showed the party could win just seven per cent of the vote - the party's lowest share ...
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0answers
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Pronunciation: TH in “There”

This might be a silly question, but I've noticed that some people in the US don't pronounce their "TH's" in some words such as (This, that, the, these, those and etc...) and some other people don't ...
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0answers
16 views

'read of' things vs read things

I am reading articles in New Concept English and got confused by a phrase in the below context: We can read of things that happened 5,000 years ago in the Near East. here I don't understand why we ...
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0answers
22 views

“Cause unwholesome inspiration and impact on viewers”

So I have this sentence, and I don't know if you can say "cause" or if I should replace it with another word. Thank you, thegirlinneedofhelp
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0answers
23 views

“Fine and you” vs “Fine how about you?”

It always sounds weird to me when I hear people say "I'm fine AND you" when I ask how they're doing. It doesn't sound natural to me, and it isn't something I hear in the US every day. I hear it ...
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0answers
17 views

Question formation, helping verbs usage

What could have we done? Or What could we have done? Which one is the correct usage. As in an interrogative sentence, helping verbs should come before the subject so I think first structure is ...
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0answers
30 views

'Get STH over with' and 'get over with STH'

Now I understood why I need to use 'with' when I use this phrasal verb as a meaning of 'to finish STH which is mostly the speaker does not want to do' But I'm still confused by this thing Why I ...
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0answers
42 views

Which is grammatically appropriate: what you brought me or what you brought for me?

In informal US English, is the "for" optional in a sentence like this: I want to know what you brought (for) me. Is it written like this, instead: I want to know what you brought me.
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201 views

average Joe vs. ordinary Joe vs. everyday normal guy vs. regular guy

I'd like to write something like the following sentence. Original sentence: Like a regular guy, you don't like picking up your dirty socks. Or maybe this sentence is not a wise word choice because a ...
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0answers
38 views

What is the appropriate word for these? -> one day, one month, one year and so on

I want to know the most appropriate word for these. one day two days three days one month two months three months one year two years three years The context where these appears is that they are ...
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99 views

'Have' or 'Has' with groups

Edit: This might be a duplicate, but I could not find a similar sentence (like mine) in any of the other questions. I have seen many questions on this topic on SE and forums. But I came across this ...
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0answers
752 views

An “s” at the end of “toward”, “inward”, “forward”, “backward”, “outward”, “upward”, “downward”

I hunger to know whether it's true that an "s" at the end of such adverb as "inward", "forward", "backward", "outward", "upward", "downward", and "toward" (as a preposition only) is a choice of ...
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0answers
46 views

How do I ask how well someone has reviewed for the midterm?

I was asking one of my classmates this question before the midterm. What I said is How's the review for the midterm? Is it how Americans phrase the sentence?
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0answers
573 views

I got it = I have got it?

Someone told me " I got it "equals " I have got it "? But why in the class I heard my teacher say: "Did you get it?" "Do you get it?" is fine?
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0answers
103 views

What is the correct word/pharsal verb for this?

A new movie is released. People are going to watch it. So we'd better take out some time too , before it "goes down " or gets "replaced" by a new one? Is this correct?
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50 views

Is there any difference between “syllabify” and “syllabize”?

When I translate sillabare with Google Translate, I get three verbs: Syllabify Syllabize Syllabise The second and the third one are surely the American spelling and the British spelling. The NOAD (...
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63 views

Subjunctive construction involving “that”

From a prep book for GMAT: Note that you should ALWAYS just use the base form of the verb in such a subjunctive construction involving the "that" clause. Wrong: she recommended that John ...
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0answers
33 views

parenthesis or participle clause?

Tony nervously watched the woman, alarmed by the clock. In this sentence, is alarmed by the clock a parenthesis or a participle clause modifying object Tony?