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Questions tagged [american-english]

This tag is for questions specifically related to the English language as spoken and written in the USA. If you are interested in a difference between American English and British English, please use transatlantic-differences.

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3answers
29 views

Before/In front of

I'd like to know if "before" and "in front of" is equally common in a sentence like this in American English? Is one more formal than the other? Elina stands before/in front of a vending machine, ...
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0answers
24 views

Is “to ease” the same as “could ease”?

Found this article online and the title is: China-U.S. trade war to ease but conflicts will persist - former finance minister But then the person is quoted of saying "could ease". Are the two ...
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2answers
43 views

How can I describe the position the man sits in in the picture?

How can I describe the position the man is sitting in in the picture? Are either of these good: A man is sitting hunched over on a chair, resting his elbows on his thighs. A man is sitting leaning ...
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1answer
32 views

Which sentence/question is right?

Why did you go there and do that? Why did you go there and did that? Why? I feel the first sentence is correct but one of my friends argued that both the things are past, so, the sentence should ...
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2answers
112 views
+50

Correct error in perfect tense

I'm self-studying English and in an exercise I'm asked to correct the errors in perfect tense of a series of sentences. One of them is the following Supposing they would have got married, wouldn't ...
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3answers
376 views

Is there a usage like “feel done” in English?

I saw a sentence like: "Have you ever felt done by blablablah?" What does it mean?
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0answers
23 views

How many years have you studied English?

For the question: How many years have you studied English? does it mean studying English only or studying all courses in English?
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1answer
62 views

Is the phrase “You can cancel a subscription anytime” correct?

One native speaker said that it is a mistake to use the indefinite article in the phrase "You can cancel a subscription anytime". I want to ask native speakers if it's true, and if yes — what rule ...
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1answer
39 views

Is “May I know” not used in American English?

I'll make it short. There's a dialog on my role play that has "May I know" in it. After being checked by an American "TOEIC" expert, he said that it's not used in American English, only in Indan, and ...
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1answer
28 views

Type of clause and correct usage in this example

It follows two sisters— one is devoted to her faith, the other breaks the community's strict rules. What would we class this type of clause ? (one is this, the other is this) What part is the main ...
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1answer
37 views

When are “to + verb” and “verb+ing” not interchangeable?

Like in the following example: I would really appreciate having some feedback on this topic. Why can’t I just write “to have” instead of “having”? In this case, they are not supposed to be ...
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2answers
25 views

“It is done” what is the sentence structure?

It is done Is "done" in the above sentence an adjunctive or a verb? Or is it a simple past tense in passive form. If so why "is" is used. Please clarify what is the structure of the sentence. This ...
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1answer
26 views
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1answer
55 views

How can I write a relationship among the objects in a sentence?

For instance, let’s say that I want to establish an association among 3 objects. In this case, let the objects be “Roses”, “Violets”, and ”Tulips”. Then, if I want to say, for example, that in my ...
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1answer
12 views

Meaning of “They were meant to have them”?

There are five pups. One for each of the stark children. The direwolf is a sigil of your house. They were meant to have them. Can you please explain the meaning of "They were meant to have them"?
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1answer
58 views

Your English is pretty good [on hold]

A native speaker of American English said to a non native speaker, Your English is pretty good. What does he really mean? Is "Your English is pretty good" a compliment? Since the adverb "pretty" ...
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2answers
75 views

Which phrase would be proper to use in written American English?

I need to say that there arises a question after making some points in my essay, so which one is better? Here probably arises a pertinent question as to why he would want to be a bio-engineer now, ...
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1answer
43 views

“On the double”, is it old-fashioned?(american English)

Under an explation of "on the double" by the Free Dictionary about "on the double", is it used in day-to-day conversations: Rapidly; faster than one normally goes. Can you please drive on ...
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1answer
12 views

context of a phrase in a sentence

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/89892/clause-vs-phrase-vs-sentence A phrase cannot be used as a stand-alone utterance, e.g. "reading a book" is a phrase. However, with proper intonation ...
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2answers
46 views

Is “serves” a verb or noun in this complex sentence? (“…and serves as a tool for communication…“)

Project scheduling provides a detailed plan that represents how and when the project will deliver the products, services, and results defined in the project scope and serves as a tool for ...
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1answer
39 views

How should I politely say “I hope I can receive recognition”?

That is used to apply to a university program and I want to politely say that I hope I can enter your program. Should that be I hope I could receive your recognition. or I hope I would/...
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1answer
25 views

What's the “payday-loan”? [closed]

I encountered the word at the title reading this article, saying, (Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Pocket Cast or ...
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1answer
31 views

can someone pleas check is it correct usage of “as well as”? [closed]

"I am a young, passionate, just graduated from university developer. Looking for a dream team where I could get challenging tasks, interesting experience, new friends and an ...
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1answer
74 views

If I learn British English, should I stop talking with Americans?

I had the opportunity to speak with several native speakers, It's fun, and they learn my native language, the problem is that several of my language partners speak with an American accent and the ...
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1answer
33 views

Transport as a noun in American English

“Sam took a transport to mother’s house”. For a matter of style I want to use the word transport or transportation as a synonym of vehicle, but for American readers. I read that in AE transport is ...
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1answer
27 views

What is the difference between “the+singular countable noun” and “zero article+plural countable noun”

What is the difference between "the + singular countable noun" and "zero article + plural countable noun" when we make generalisations about classes of things.
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1answer
39 views

Is there really a difference between the use of will and shall?

Shall I open the door? Will I open the door? So far as I know , the first sentence means will you allow me to open the door? The second question means Will I have the ability to open the door? (...
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1answer
40 views

Past participle usage in below sentences / passives

I hope all the below form of sentences give ‘Passive’ meanings, am I correct? 1) be + verb3 [i.e. past participle] be prepared. 2) being + verb3 being processed (but in continuous form). 3) ...
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3answers
4k views

“compare with” or “compare to”

Please check both sentences and let me know, which one is correct and why? She compares me with her boyfriend. She compares me to her boyfriend.
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1answer
21 views
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0answers
18 views

When teachers introduce the outdated theory(for example:Classical element) to students,should teachers use present tense or past tense to describe it?

Example: 1(a)Classical element comprises the simplest substances,namely earth, water, air, fire and Aether. 1(b)Classical element comprised the simplest substances,namely earth, water, air, fire and ...
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1answer
24 views

“Survivors clinging to a raft.” Is this sentence right?

"Survivors clinging to a raft." There is no verb in this sentence. I know this sentence is not the present progressive/present continuous. But can this sentence be used independently? I found this ...
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2answers
37 views

I am unintersted / disinterested in English?

I am uninterested in English. I am disinterested in English. Some grammar books say that the use of disinterested is wrong in the context as it means unbiased or impartial But Michael Swan in ...
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1answer
52 views

How do you make the flap t sound as in the words city and letter

I'm having a hard time figuring out the right placement and motions of the tongue when making this consonant. I watched a few videos on this topic. People say that in order to make the sound you don't ...
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1answer
22k views

“I texted you on…”, “in…”, or “by…” – which preposition do I use?

Which of these prepositions is correct in these sentences? I texted you on WhatsApp. I texted you in WhatsApp. I texted you by WhatsApp.
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0answers
15 views

Is “the + every/each/always + noun” used?

I met this structure at my TOEIC tests, but I couldn't remember the whole sentence. Is this a kind of structure used formally? I've never met this before.
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1answer
13 views

Is the “are” in this sentence ungrammatical?

Is the “are” in this sentence ungrammatical? ​‎How do you feel about some people are calling you "Toma-chan" in Japan?
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1answer
23 views

Has gone vs is visiting

What is difference between these two examples below, and why? .1 Alex isn't here. She is visiting her mother. .2 Alex isn't here. She has gone to visit her mother.
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1answer
15 views

Confusion in usage of “of” in a sentence

I read the below statement today. "Muhammad Ali was born in the small town of Louisville." Here Louisville is described as a small town. Normally when we use "small town of XXX", are we ...
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1answer
46 views

Usage of “that only X can"

Is this sentence correct? Who said that only girls can believe in fairies? Specifically, do you think that the use of "that, only, can" make the sentence a little bit weird? Or is it fine?
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1answer
41 views

Understanding “ear-first” and “crowded room”

what does "enter crowded rooms" and "ear-first" mean in this sentence from the passage: The paper’s eyes were big and round, whereas mine disappear altogether if I smile, and my nose is more ...
2
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1answer
110 views

Is it possible to pronounce jury as /dʒɜːri/?

sometimes I hear Americans pronounce jury as ''/dʒɜːri/''. Is that right? Is it regional or generally they say this way?
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1answer
135 views

Is “which is directly affecting our operational duties” correct in this sentence? Should it be “which are” instead?

Is the following sentence correct: I would like to point upcoming events in Week 19, which is directly affecting our operational duties. I think it should be "which are", and the verb affect ...
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1answer
69 views

The meaning of “of course,” “sure” when you thank someone

Sometimes I thank a person from USA and he responds, "Sure," "of course." I don't know what their meaning in this context, so could anyone give me their meaning?
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0answers
56 views

How do you say 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 in word form? [duplicate]

I was reading a book called “BOMB” and the number 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 and I wanted to know what this number is in word form (how you say the word).
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2answers
26 views

what's difference about these two sentence?

sentence 1: The House would initiate a formal impeachment inquiry against President Trump, charging him with betraying his oath of office and the nation’s security by seeking to enlist a foreign ...
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1answer
57 views

Is the word liberal used properly in this sentence

A friend once told me, when you're lost you're liberal and when you're liberal you can go anywhere Is "liberal" used properly here?
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1answer
24 views

In my sentence can I add a comma to the word before?

I want to know if adding a comma before the word "before" would be correct or not. I had been struggling to find partners for three years before I found the best partners who helped me to learn ...
1
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2answers
197 views

is he's / she's + name a correct sentence?

Is it correct to include a name right after a he's or she's? It would define fully written in: ''He is John'' or ''She is Maria'' but it somehow just sounds wrong or impolite to me.
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1answer
42 views

Is “easier than before” used in everyday English?

I want to know if "easier than before" is correct in my sentence or not, and how I can say something makes things better than before. For example. "Our smartphones make learning languages easier ...