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Questions tagged [american-english]

This tag is for questions specifically related to the English language as spoken and written in the USA. If you are interested in a difference between American English and British English, please use transatlantic-differences.

62 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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How do I ask how well someone has reviewed for the midterm?

I was asking one of my classmates this question before the midterm. What I said is How's the review for the midterm? Is it how Americans phrase the sentence?
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672 views

I got it = I have got it?

Someone told me " I got it "equals " I have got it "? But why in the class I heard my teacher say: "Did you get it?" "Do you get it?" is fine?
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107 views

What is the correct word/pharsal verb for this?

A new movie is released. People are going to watch it. So we'd better take out some time too , before it "goes down " or gets "replaced" by a new one? Is this correct?
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63 views

Is there any difference between “syllabify” and “syllabize”?

When I translate sillabare with Google Translate, I get three verbs: Syllabify Syllabize Syllabise The second and the third one are surely the American spelling and the British spelling. The NOAD (...
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65 views

Subjunctive construction involving “that”

From a prep book for GMAT: Note that you should ALWAYS just use the base form of the verb in such a subjunctive construction involving the "that" clause. Wrong: she recommended that John ...
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3answers
376 views

Is there a usage like “feel done” in English?

I saw a sentence like: "Have you ever felt done by blablablah?" What does it mean?
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34 views

parenthesis or participle clause?

Tony nervously watched the woman, alarmed by the clock. In this sentence, is alarmed by the clock a parenthesis or a participle clause modifying object Tony?
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1answer
1k views

What do you have to say for yourself? / What have you got to say for yourself?

Which of below is American and which is British English when you want someone to explain themselves? What do you have to say for yourself? What have you got to say for yourself?
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2answers
80 views

Which of the two sentences is correct? If both are, which one is better?

I want to know which sentence is better of the two? I am not in mood to do debate. I am not in a mood to debate.
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1answer
144 views

In the long run, right will out

There is a common proverb in our language which says: "Always someone who's right and has the right, will achieve it because it was his / her right." The only equivalent I found is: In the long ...
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1answer
24 views

In my sentence can I add a comma to the word before?

I want to know if adding a comma before the word "before" would be correct or not. I had been struggling to find partners for three years before I found the best partners who helped me to learn ...
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1answer
26 views

Meaning of “Voice going crazy on this hook like a whirlwind?”

What is the meaning of this phrase: Voice going crazy on this hook like a whirlwind? It's from the song called Boyfriend. In context, the lyrics say: Girlfriend, girlfriend, I could be you ...