Questions tagged [apostrophe]

This tag is for questions about the usage of the apostrophe.

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"The Bag of My Sister's" vs "The Bag of My Sister" - double possessive

The bag of my sister's The bag of my sister The bag of an actress The bag of an actress's when do we use and not use Apostrophe + s (for singular, uncountable, and irregular plural nouns) / ...
hwkal's user avatar
  • 487
1 vote
1 answer
44 views

"Shiv and Parvati's son" or "Shiv's and Parvati's son"?

I'm writing a story about Lord Ganesh; which of the following is more correct? Ganesh claimed to be Shiv and Parvati's son. Ganesh claimed to be Shiv's and Parvati's son.
Shoes's user avatar
  • 119
2 votes
2 answers
108 views

Where to put the apostrophe in a sentence where the name contains an appositive?

If the name in the sentence contains an appostive, does it change the location of the apostrophe? For example: John Smith's car is red Now imagine I have an appostive to that subject that comes ...
LcSalazar's user avatar
  • 183
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Apostrophe after apostrophe [duplicate]

The artifical inteligence generated this sentence and I got in a double. Does it make sense to put apostrophes like this: Business Contact’s company's workforce. It means the workforce of the company ...
LeanKervi's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
78 views

“Chemical toxicity" or "Chemical's toxicity”?

When is it chemical toxicity or chemical's toxicity? I think both words mean the same. Is there any difference between them? For example, From studies in animals, however, it became clear that the ...
Aryendu Kumar's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
50 views

What's the correct form: "pets island" or '"pet's island"

I'm trying to write a short paragraph about an animal island and I'm a bit confused as to what would be the correct sentence to use for the title.
Frikar's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
2 answers
55 views

Are there any specific rules for when to use a 'noun+noun' structure and when to use a 'noun+ apostrophe s, or noun+ s apostrophe' structure? [duplicate]

English is sometimes confusing. For instance, do we say 'Goat milk' or 'Goats' milk'? Or 'Cow meat' or 'Cows' meat'?
Haroon Parsa's user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
54 views

Does "on its ownsome" have an apostrophe or not in the its? [closed]

Referring to (say) some computer code, a table, or whatever: "It sits there and does it on its ownsome." Should be its or it's ? (Unrelated aside on spelling of ownsome. https://www....
Fattie's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
81 views

is it possible (or mandatory) to use apostrophe after the word minutes in this case?

I am doing my business course assessent and the teacher gave us a case study about a coffee shop. The coffee has a policy of serving within 2 minutes. Of course, in my answer, I can write "...
LeanKervi's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
63 views

Is there a rule to use apostrophes in the possessive form instead of "of"?

Compared to my natural language (Portuguese) it is very strange to use apostrophes to denote ownership, like: Peter's book. In Portuguese, I would say "the book of Peter". Also, “...
Duck's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
34 views

confused about the usage of apostrophe

I was confused about the usage of apostrophe. Can you please answer which one is correct and why? Do you copy other's code? Do you copy others' code?
Isteak Ahamed Imon's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
17 views

Which is correct: any of humans' languages,OR 'any of human languages'?

I am currently working on my SAT book, and I encountered a question like this: The Golden Record contains a great cross-section of human civilizations, but that information still needs to be ...
Kyle S's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
4k views

"two weeks' time" vs "two-week time"

I know that: (1) in two weeks' time - correct (2) in two-week time - incorrect But I don't know what will be without "in". For example (my own sentences): (3) Two weeks' time is enough for a ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
175 views

What is the difference in using an apostrophe between UK and US?

cambridge.org: UK doll's house cambridge.org: US dollhouse cambridge.org: UK year end cambridge.org: US year's end In the first example, an apostrophe is typical for UK and not typical for US. In the ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
48 views

When we refer to a 'Room key', is the room being used as an adjective here? can't I say 'Room's key' instead?

What I am trying to find out here is the etymology of the phrase "Room key". Surely, it must have been "room's key" first. When and how did it become "Room key"? and Can ...
Frank's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
369 views

What does an apostrophe change, appearing instead of "g" in the ending "ing"? (doing → doin')

As far as I understand, if an apostrophe is in place of some letter, this letter isn't pronounced. For example: is not ['iz 'na:t] → isn't ['iznt] about [ə'baut] → 'bout ['baut] because [bɪˈkɑ:z] → '...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,242
1 vote
1 answer
82 views

Should there be a possessive in "like that of a peacock('s)"?

She has great charm, even like that of a peacock's She has great charm, even like that of a peacock The comparison is not between the lady and the peacock. It is between the charms of the lady and ...
Ammu's user avatar
  • 543
0 votes
2 answers
138 views

for word ending with s/ or s sound, when do we omit extra s n when don't?

I've just started reading 'Writing in the technical field' by Thorsten Ewald and in it, it was written for the possessive of words ending with s( or s sound) you can choose to add s or not ( most ...
anonymous's user avatar
12 votes
4 answers
3k views

Shouldn't there be a ('s) in "University of Texas('s) Basketball Coach"?

I came across this New York Times headline: University of Texas Basketball Coach Faces Felony Domestic Assault Charge Shouldn't there be a ('s) in this construction like, "University of Texas's ...
thralho thakles's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
201 views

Apostrophe with job titles

Do we use apostrophes when talking about a job position within a company? Example: IDB's director John or IDB director John Thanks
Juliana A.'s user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
128 views

What does “a'walking” mean?

The title of Elvis Presley’s song: The girl next door went a'walking. What does a’ mean?
Ola's user avatar
  • 13
1 vote
1 answer
33 views

Bob Marley music or Bob Marley's music

Which of these sentences would you say? I think they're both idiomatic. What's the difference between them? I listen to Bob Marley music. or I listen to Bob Marley's music.
Pumpkin cake's user avatar
  • 1,005
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

Title with apostrophe

If I say my title is: Vice President’s ServiceNow Developer This implies that I work for the vice president, as a ServiceNow developer, kinda like an assistant, right? My thought the experiment was to ...
Juan Casas's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
275 views

Using 's for "ancestors"

Majumder grew up in the house of his _______. ancestors' ancestor Which one of these should I use?
Sayem Rahman's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
186 views

Is the apostrophe in the title "Demon's souls" misused?

The title for the game as advertised is Demon's Souls, which in my understanding translates to "Demon is souls" which is relatively wrong, I think. Rather it should be written like Demons ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
513 views

If I want to avoid the possessive apostrophe, could I write "John his new tires are great" instead of "John's tires are great"?

How to rewrite a sentence to avoid the possessive apostrophe? Why? I have been told to avoid apostrophes altogether for international English as it's confusing. This is easily done for contractions ...
Aineir's user avatar
  • 29
1 vote
1 answer
116 views

Is it apostrophe-s or only the apostrophe for singular nouns ending in -s?

This page gives the following examples of correct punctuation showing possession for singular nouns ending in -s: Thomas's job the bus's arrival James's fiancée Steve Davis's victory VS Socrates' ...
Sergey Slepov's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
290 views

Apostrophe usage in job titles

Why is apostrophe not used in job titles such as "Production Assistant" or "Production Engineer". My understanding about these roles is that people are part or are members of the ...
Gabriel Molina's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
72 views

I was at my parents. Vs. I was at my parents'./I was at Chris. vs. I was at Chris's

I am wondering which sentences from the following sentences is correct: I was at my parents. or I was at my parents'. I was at Chris. or I was at Chris's.
Piotr's user avatar
  • 187
3 votes
1 answer
74 views

What does the single quotation(') in 'bout mean?

More specifically, I want to know what is the single quotation(') in 'bout means. I know 'bout means about but does that mean we always can use a single quotation for words that start with a vowel? Or ...
Arian_ki's user avatar
  • 133
-2 votes
1 answer
72 views

Apostrophe with company names [closed]

How do I say this? Zowie mice are better than Logitech. Zowie's mice are better than Logitech's. Zowies are better than Logitechs.
English--more exc than laws's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
231 views

Rules for using possessive "s" to describe quantity

I'd like to know how to explain the rules for use of possessive "s" to describe the quantity of something, as in, "two hours' work" to an English learner. This answer at english....
gotube's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
25 views

Should I keep apostrophes in this case?

Do I need to keep apostrophes in the following sentence?: Introduction of the four-day working week worked to everyone's advantage, both the employees' and the company's. Or can I simply drop them?: ...
brilliant's user avatar
  • 4,305
0 votes
0 answers
11 views

Genitive plural opinions! Which is correct: Tomorrow the sister of a university friend of Clare and John is getting married. Or of Clare's and John's? [duplicate]

Native speaker here confused about genitive case. Genitive plural opinions! Which is correct: Tomorrow the sister of a university friend of Clare and John is getting married Tomorrow the sister of a ...
Claire 's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
192 views

the use of possessive s with both words before the adjective

which one is correct? should we use apostrophe s with both nouns preceding? I want to know teachers' and students' favorite movies? I want to know teachers and students' favorite movies?
Fred's user avatar
  • 49
0 votes
0 answers
83 views

possessive and adjective form of "the 1920s"

What's the possessive or adjective form of the 1920s? Is it the 1920s' (with an apostrophe following the s)? Most books only talk about the plural form, which I think is a settled issue, but the ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
2 votes
1 answer
180 views

Is the possessive of a name that ends in 's' pronounced differently if it refers to a group of people (like a band) instead of a single person? [duplicate]

How do you think names that have the plural "s" should be pronounced when they get the apostrophe? I researched this on the web and I couldn't find any very reliable results. For example, ...
Fire and Ice's user avatar
  • 1,304
1 vote
1 answer
138 views

Sequential Possession

Why do we avoid sequential possession? For example, why don't we write 'My friend's wife's necklace was stolen' Instead we write, 'The necklace of my friend's wife was stolen. '
Ashutosh's user avatar
  • 181
1 vote
1 answer
343 views

Is it "nobody's business but the Turks" or "nobody's business but the Turks'"?

Is it nobody's business but the Turks (it's nobody's business, except that it is the business of the Turks); or is it nobody's business but the Turks' (it's nobody's business, except that it is the ...
Hammerite's user avatar
  • 119
1 vote
1 answer
30 views

can't understand why 's is in this sentence

In the sentence "Foreign visitors are only allowed one month's residence", why is 's used? I found this sentence in an old version of the Oxford Advanced Learner's dictionary.
Emad's user avatar
  • 113
1 vote
0 answers
404 views

Which is the correct way of writing years - '90-'91 or '90-91?

While writing years (like 1990 to 1991) with apostrophes, should the apostrophe come before both the years (as in '90-'91) or just the first one (as in '90-91)?
Ani's user avatar
  • 51
1 vote
0 answers
80 views

The usage of the apostrophe

Does the usage of the apostrophe in this article headline only occur in formal writing? Because I only see it being used in an article headline. I'm sorry if I'm talking nonsense. Always Sunny’s ...
Khaled Khaled's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

January's schedule vs. January schedule

Is it January's schedule or January schedule? I also get confused with whether to include an apostrophe before "bill." This is my January bill or January's bill.
Student's user avatar
  • 197
1 vote
1 answer
95 views

“My friend’s actual job involves a lot of work” or “The actual job of my friend involves a lot of work”

These two sentences have same meaning. But my question is which one of them is more correct?
Pranjul Khirwar's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
299 views

Usage of apostrophe - "it's" versus "its"

Do you write print its value or print it's value? It drives me crazy since I started learning advanced English (Native French speaker here) My reasoning would be its because it is value isn't quite ...
Nicolas Formichella's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
106 views

Is it correct to avoid using apostrophe in this situation?

I want to know whether it is possible to avoid using the apostrophe as suggested in the second option? or it should remain the same as it is in the first option?. Since it is the salute, I'm not sure ...
pepo's user avatar
  • 107
0 votes
1 answer
82 views

Is it allowed to omit apostrophes after `s`?

In this question meaning of the s' explained, but what if I'll say my childrens toys (several kids), i.e. with no ' after s ?
R S's user avatar
  • 219
0 votes
2 answers
87 views

apostrophe or "of" to show possession

It is stated within my grammar textbook that, "for things, ideas etc., we normally use of to show possession". So for example: The temperature of the water. (Not the water's temperature) ...
shapoor's user avatar
  • 719
3 votes
1 answer
168 views

Is this ad at a barber shop worded correctly?

Recently I saw an sign at a barber shop on which I read on bold letters: "Men's only" Is this a correct writing? I think that it has to be "Men only" to make clear that it is a ...
chris from cologne's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
128 views

Which use of possessive is correct "I'm grateful for my mother's love" or "I'm grateful for the love of my mother"?

Which use of possessive is correct "I'm grateful for my mother's love" or "I'm grateful for the love of my mother" ? Or are they both correct, but carry different meaning? I ...
Monica Vega's user avatar