Questions tagged [appositives]

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She is poor at writing grammatical English(,) because you can find that she has obvious grammar errors in her English. - difference in meaning?

Example 1 She is poor at writing grammatical English, because you can find that she has obvious grammar errors in her English. Example 2 She is poor at writing grammatical English because you can ...
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He made the decision that he "would/will" move to New York - which to use?

Example 1 "He made the decision that he would move to New York." Example 2 "He made the decision that he will move to New York." If he made the decision but has not moved yet ...
vincentlin's user avatar
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Where to put the apostrophe in a sentence where the name contains an appositive?

If the name in the sentence contains an appostive, does it change the location of the apostrophe? For example: John Smith's car is red Now imagine I have an appostive to that subject that comes ...
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What does 'of the sort' mean in meaning and grammar?

From Jim Miller. (2002). An Introduction to English Syntax. p.109. Nouns in English do not fall into different grammatical classes of the sort found in Latin. As the book has discussed in Chapter 5 ...
Mr. Wang's user avatar
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What is this name for this piece of language, and how is it best positioned?

In the following, is the portion between the commas "...for any of a number of reasons..." -- an adverbial phrase, or appositive phrase, or what? And what rules or guidelines, strict or ...
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Usage of "results" (from GRE)

Nylenna's study showed that errors in scientific manuscripts submitted for publication often escape reviewer's notice, results that were not _______: when Godlee conducted a study of the same ...
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"<Long> a proponent of government health insurance, he pointed out that millions of Americans have no health insurance at all."

cambridge.org: (1) Long a proponent of government health insurance, he pointed out that millions of Americans have no health insurance at all. I can't understand the grammar of using "long" ...
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What is an appositive and how should it be punctuated?

An appositive is a noun that immediately follows another noun in order to clarify it. An appositive usually follows the noun it explains or identifies, but it may also precede it. Restrictive ...
UnbakedDecimeter's user avatar
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parsing "The shop stocks everything from cigarettes to recycled loo paper."

thefreedictionary.com: (1) The shop stocks everything from cigarettes to recycled loo paper. Am I right that?: The noun phrase "everything from cigarettes to recycled loo paper" is the ...
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Is the second "people" appositive?

I read the sentence "We’ve had a couple of incidents of people coming in very distressed, people who thought they’d never need a food bank." from the Guardian news. There are two questions: ...
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Commas with appositive?

a. The brother of Pete's wife, John, was at the party. b. The brother of Pete's wife John was at the party. Which is correctly punctuated if John is the brother of Pete's wife? I think the problem ...
azz's user avatar
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What is this sentence's appositive phrase?

From what I know, an appositive phrase is a phrase that describes or renames the noun before or after it. However, I feel like the positive phrase could be either 'The Chemist' or 'Professor Ramirez' ...
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with or without a comma: "my close friend John"

I'm wondering if the following sentences are both OK. If so, what's the difference? The one you saw is my close friend, John. The one you saw is my close friend John.
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Which clause is in bold below?

Davidson’s article is one of a number of pieces that have recently appeared making the point that the reason we have such stubbornly high unemployment and declining middle-class incomes today is ...
Gerrie's user avatar
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Why can’t appositives be chained?

“Sam, my brother, John’s cousin, arrived.” I think it’s possible that “my brother” modifies “Sam” and “John’s cousin” modifies “my brother”, and I can’t understand why it shouldn’t? “I love lemon leaf ...
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Should you use appositive in this sentence?

Which one of these sentences is correct? It took him a bit of time to reach the scene, and along the way, he wondered why the ranger, Erick, took so long to kill one rabbit. Or It took him a bit of ...
ZZZ's user avatar
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Appositive with “no” [closed]

Given the statements "Jennifer is a smart student" and "[this] Jennifer doesn’t exist", I am trying to write a single sentence that explains both these things. I have two ideas ...
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appositive phrase

His belly was swollen—sure signs that he would die soon. It's an example sentence in a workbook. Is the use of signs correct? The plural looks weird.
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Apposition: two actions at the same time

If I was moving quickly and I was moving in the park at the same time, is ‘moving quickly is moving in the park’ a true sentence? I’m confused because I’ve only dealt with object (tangible) apposition....
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Using commas in case of "you" + an appositive

I am not sure if my understanding is correct about how commas must be used in case of a pronoun "you" and an appositive. The wikipedia page on apposition says: And The Blue Book of Grammar ...
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Can appositives modify entire sentences?

On this resource (towards the bottom of the page), it is implied that an appositive can modify an entire sentence. These are the two examples given: Economic changes have reduced Russian population ...
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Commas with restrictive sentences

1:The 1987 movie, Innerspace, was pure science fiction. Would the comma placement here suggest this was the only movie of that year and is it still in a correct appositive structure if the ...
bluebell1's user avatar
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Can one appositive modify two nouns?

When researching appositives, I have noticed that none of the provided examples (that I can find), such as this sample of my research, demonstrate one appositive modifying two nouns. Here is a simple ...
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Can identification of a noun be done by prenominal modification?

I have seen many examples of identification of a noun by using prenominal modification, in which I had already expected it should be done by "apposition"; for example, in my opinion, the ...
Later's user avatar
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Can relationship nouns be used as adjectives?

We're all familiar with how an appositive functions: My sister, Mary, came to the party. <--I have one sister. My sister Mary came to the party. <--I have more than one sister. My question is, ...
Heather Morton's user avatar
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Do I need a comma with this appositive about Prince Phillip?

Do I need a comma before the word "dies" in the following sentence?: Prince Philip, husband of the Queen of the United Kingdom Elizabeth II, dies at the age of 99, two months before his ...
brilliant's user avatar
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Comma usage influencing context/meaning

a) He continued to mark his papers when student Sarah entered the room. Without the context of say: *his favourite student or a specific description such as the student with the red hair can commas be ...
bluebell1's user avatar
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Correct usage with definite article/titles

https://blog.inkforall.com/appositive In this example from the resource: 1)The dermatologist, Dr Miller, looked me over from head to toe. Does the removal of the definite article 'the' change the ...
bluebell1's user avatar
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Do I use appositive clause correctly?

Can I use appositive clause (in bold) in the following way: The merits of technology should never be denied, that they eliminate the inconvenience of attending events in person, be it traffic ...
HypnoticBuggyWraithVirileBevy's user avatar
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appositive clause or relative clause?----" it was the way the setting sun illuminated the yellowing plastic."

Then there it was, an ad for “Joe’s Café,” perched atop a metal pole, which was upright under a cape of kudzu vines. Maybe it was the way the setting sun illuminated the yellowing plastic. Maybe it ...
HypnoticBuggyWraithVirileBevy's user avatar
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2 answers
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"a much older dating method: dendrochronology" or" a much older dating method, dendrochronology"?

They turned to a much older dating method: dendrochronology, the use of tree rings for mapping intervals of time. (From ACT English) Why in this case has it to be a colon, but not a comma? I think ...
HypnoticBuggyWraithVirileBevy's user avatar
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1 answer
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Modifying nouns without relative pronouns or relative proverbs

Do those sentences below sound natural? 1.She’s got that hair the color of chestnut.(Modified by the objective) 2.I looked in the mirror the size of my two hands.(Modifies by the objective) 3.I saw ...
Kmd's user avatar
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She's got hair of a raven VS She's got raven hair

She's got hair of a raven Can we just omit "of" when we cannot add a suffix to a noun to turn it into an adjective? For example, She's got raven hair I mean situations where if a suffix ...
WillS's user avatar
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"The theory of organic architecture: that structure should appear " VS "the theory of organic architecture that structure should appear"

In the sentence below: The other theory underlying Wright's design is that of organic architecture: that structure should appear to be an extension of their surroundings. ( From an ACT test) ...
HypnoticBuggyWraithVirileBevy's user avatar
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difference: "namely" and "e.g."

Would there be any difference if "namely" were replaced by "e.g." in the following? Some say "namely" means "that is (to say)" or "i.e." and is used ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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Appositive phrase usage

Can I use an appositive phrase after a pronoun? Because some non-native speaker said it was grammatically incorrect. Such as, "I, Deep, am learning the English language."
Deep's user avatar
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Usage with appositives and titles

Hermione Granger, a witch at Hogwarts School, is accomplished at spells. The core of this sentence is Hermione Granger is accomplished at spells. (A witch at Hogwarts School is an appositive noun ...
bluebell1's user avatar
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a Northern Inuit dog, which is a breed with a wolf-like appearance

Consider the following pairs of sentence. The members of each pair differ in the order of a specific term and an explanation of its meaning. a. John bought a Northern Inuit dog, which is a breed with ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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The uses of appositive in a sentence

AS TAIWANESE CONTEMPLATED the momentous occasion, in March 1996, of being able to choose their president for the first time, China’s Communist Party launched a campaign of intimidation. When I read ...
Habib Khandaker's user avatar
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Does a that-clause as appositive after a plural noun call for a definite article before it?

Why there is no definite article before "claims' in the following sentence? Does the that-clause after the plural noun 'claims' in the following sentence make it specific? Or is the noun still ...
Balagopal Pt's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is this an appositive or object complement? "that most students do not understand grammar"

Is the noun clause an appositive or object complement? Is there any rule or test to identify the noun clause as appositive or object complement? I have often declared the problem that most students ...
Opal's user avatar
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Can an appositive noun not follow the noun in apposition to it?

In ancient times, a great Chinese leader was born: Confucius. Confucius is the appositive noun here, and a great Chinese leader is a noun in apposition to it. Can "Confucius" and "a great Chinese ...
vincentlin's user avatar
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What (if any) article should I use in constructions like '(the/a) (famous) journalist/actor/writer John Doe'?

No article is used with official titles, like 'President Clinton', but the rule does not apply to all professions, right? I know that in postposition it goes with an indefinite article, like ...
Sergey Zolotarev's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
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"Great Leader, X" or "Great Leader X"

I want to know if that comma is necessary in this case, it kinda gives me a feeling that it should be used but I'm not really sure. They went directly to the Great Leader, X They went directly to the ...
NotAMartialArtist's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
71 views

How to use apposition

1- The living room, the biggest room in the house, looks out on to a beautiful garden. 2- We will be rebaptizing you, my most loyal followers. Can I rewrite them as in: 1a- The living room,...
Talha Özden's user avatar
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Can "to-infinitive phrase" be an apposition of "that"?

For example, That, to quit smoking and take care of yourself, is up to you. is this sentence grammatically correct? (I think it's grammatically correct if we think of "to quit smoking and take ...
GKK's user avatar
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Is "meeting you here" the appositive of "a coincidence"?

What a coincidence meeting you here! Today, I came across this expression for the first time. I have three questions of this sentence. Is "meeting you here" the appositive of "a coincidence"? If 1 ...
GKK's user avatar
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I want to know when to able to grammatically omit "that" leading an appositive clause

She had a feeling (that) this would be the last time Back in my school, I learnt not to omit "that' when it's leading an appositive clause as in the example, but I've just heard that with or without "...
GKK's user avatar
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I have no ideas whether it's an appositive case or relative-pronoun case

I went the distance she went. Is this sentence kind of an appositive case? Can we think of "that" as omitted in the sentence as in "I went the distance (that) she went? Here, "that" is leading a ...
GKK's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Is this expression right?

With my good friend, Brian's help, I can skate very well now. I wonder whether this expression is right, since 'Brian's help' and 'my good friend' seem to be in apposition.
FlickerSoul's user avatar