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Questions tagged [australian-english]

for questions specifically related to the English language as spoken and written in Australia.

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0
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1answer
22 views

Is there really a difference between the use of will and shall?

Shall I open the door? Will I open the door? So far as I know , the first sentence means will you allow me to open the door? The second question means Will I have the ability to open the door? (...
2
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2answers
45 views

“curbing out cigarette smoking”

In this sentence "curbing out" reads strange. I can't find much on Google. It doesn't appear to have any meaning beyond "curbing", "inhibiting", and I am not sure the tag-along preposition "out" adds ...
0
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1answer
46 views

Is Headache used as verb in “it does my headache”?

In Australia I hear this phrase all the time, like. You are doing my headache. It does my headache. You do my headache, mate. He does my headache. My previous knowledge of the word tells ...
0
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1answer
14 views

When I use intransitive words, should I put the adverb after the intransitive words?

For example: She sings loudly In which stuation can I put the adverb before the intransitive verb? Can I say: Someone totally is beautiful or Someone is totally beautiful
0
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1answer
20 views

Comparison by 'as'

If I have two questions and both of them can be solved by the same concept then if I want to say that 'the explanation of second sentence is same as first sentence'. Is it correct, can I say this? ...
0
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1answer
14 views

They question or expression

This is a conversation between two girls I heard in audio. Bride and her mate were talking about the groom. Lorrain look what we both are doing. We're picking on poor Des to pieces the night before ...
0
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1answer
57 views

Meaning of “don't you ever let up”

In a TV show I heard this: An asian girl comes in a park. A girl in a group of friends says "Look what the cat dragged in". A boy(her boy friend) in the group says "don't you ever let up. What ...
0
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1answer
36 views

Turned/might have turned

I heard in an australian tv show a lady says: If my mother was alive today, she turn in a grave to see the way i am treated. So the question here is shouldn't she had said: she might have turned ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Are can and could interchangeable in probabilistic situation?

There was a scenario in which I and my co-worker were finding a piece of laminate, and then my co-worker said "it could be in the racks". Then I asked him can we say "it can be in the racks" and he ...
1
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1answer
64 views

What is the difference between the words “over” and “here”?

I've noticed that sometimes English speakers use over similar to here, e.g. once me and my friend saw a girl walking he said call her over -- here it seems like he meant call her here. In another ...
1
vote
1answer
654 views

What does aye mean in Australia and New Zealand?

In my previous job I heard many Australian speakers using aye like sorry and pardon to ask for repeating what other person said. I also heard one kiwi guy using aye in the same way. But, now I work ...
1
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4answers
839 views

What does “muster through” mean?

From the movie Tracks: Man: Where you from? Robyn: I grew up on a cattle station near Darling Downs. Man: Oh, a Queenslander, eh? What'd you run? Robyn: Hereford. Man: ...
17
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1answer
2k views

What do “blacks” and “missions” refer to in this context about Australia?

From the movie Tracks: Robyn: Would you mind not taking pictures? Rick: A man has to do his job. Robyn: That's exactly the reason blacks were dumped in missions... men just doing their ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Word sounding like “you-know-a-theme” and meaning something like “prudence”

This is probably best suited to the dedicated chatroom, but unfortunately I don’t have enough rep to enter it. There’s a word that I don’t understand in a formal speech in a youtube video. The word ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Word pronounced “fund-ries” in Australian English

This is probably best suited to the dedicated chatroom, but unfortunately I don’t have enough rep to enter it. There’s a word that I don’t understand in a formal speech in a youtube video. The word ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Words pronounced “subtle or gemene messed-up” in Australian English

There’s a short passage that I don’t understand in a formal speech in a youtube video. The passage starts at 6:30, and the URL is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJJX123tIwA#t=6m25s Here is my ...
2
votes
1answer
118 views

How to say person A is calling(looking for) person B?

Sometimes I am in a situation where one person(person A) needs another(person B), who(B) is working close to me but doesn't hear the first person(A) and then the first person(A) shouts to me to inform ...
2
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2answers
233 views

I hear non-natives say it

I am wondering if addressing a person as ''Dear'' sounds casual, friendly or formal. For example, ''Thanks dear'' Is it used in business letters nowadays or is it outdated? I hear *dear used a lot by ...
2
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2answers
2k views

“Much much more” in formal language

How would I say, "much much more" in a formal manner? I need to write a report and cannot come up with a more formal way of saying, much much more. This is to be placed at the end of a list: ...
0
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1answer
75 views

hold zero expression meaning

what's the meaning of long hold zero in the following sentence although I was not able to long hold zero to turn off the engine after this
0
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1answer
83 views

What is the name of the steel guard in this image?

What is the name of the steel guard marked by cross in the below image? What is the name of the thing that this bike is locked to?
21
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5answers
5k views

Why blame the Australians?

I noticed the following comments under a hot meta post: Downvoting questions from new users I agree this is horribly bad form. I blame the Australians. – Andrew But @Andrew, as you yourself ...
2
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1answer
562 views

The expression “your right” when used to respond to an apology

Here in Australia, people say something like 'you're right' or 'your right' or 'you right', sometimes followed by 'mate' to respond to an apology. Below is an example circumstance: Ouch! Oops, ...
4
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3answers
191 views

Is it normal if my tongue doesn't come between my teeth while saying “What is this thing”

Whenever I pronounce it, it seems as if my tongue says "What is dis ting" (Albeit, there's a slight "h" in the thing). Is it normal for this to happen?
2
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2answers
254 views

Is Canadian English considered more as American En or as British English?

Is Canadian English considered more as American English or as British English or neither? I always thought that there are only British English and American English but recently I realized that there ...
1
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1answer
118 views

What is meaning of “Still.” as a sentence in conversation?

I'm reading an Australian novel. There are an expression "Still." but I don't know the exact meaning. like She nodded and smiled. "Still. What can I do?" or "Still. It's a real shame." What is ...
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3answers
359 views

When should we use “these ones” vs “those ones”?

When we are talking about things we can say "these ones" or those ones". What is the difference in fact? For example if I want to point with a index finger on two things, should I say "those ones" ...
2
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4answers
874 views

An American equivalent for “to do the dirty on someone”?

To do the dirty on someone means, in Australian and British English, to behave unfairly or very badly towards someone, often without them knowing. And then he did the dirty on her and went and had ...
2
votes
2answers
18k views

“Bo” - what does it mean exactly?

What does it mean exactly when an Australian sends a greeting by "Bo" in daily conversation? Does it just mean "hello"? Does it have different meaning if it is said by a person from the native ...
5
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1answer
700 views

Meaning of “out the front”

I'm a U.S. speaker, and I'm editing a text using Australian speech. The way they are using this term "out the front" sounds like the way U.S. English would say "out front", meaning in the front part ...
6
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2answers
1k views

“How are you?” as a welcome in a shop

As an Italian in Australia for a while, I noticed this very common use of "how are you" as a greeting to welcome you into a shop, and customers answer with a second "how are you". A stranger, in Italy,...
0
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2answers
860 views

'They would be looking at a week Monday' - what does this mean?

They would be looking at a week Monday - does that work for you? Does it mean? I should be available on Monday next week. or I should be available on any working day in the next week.
2
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0answers
743 views

What does the expression or slang “Bootstrap” means and which expressions contain it in Australian Slang? [closed]

I have seen "bootstrap" in a few sentences. What does it mean or which expressions contain this word? "We ended up in a right bootstrap last night" "Bootstrap you horney bugger"
0
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2answers
63 views

Isn't there 'the' in this audio?

The announcement that Canberra-based Aspen Medical will step into the front line of Australia's response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has been widely welcomed. (Aussie ABC, ABC's original) ...
4
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1answer
82 views

pronounce 'have': thirty nations [have] gathered

Thirty nations, including China and Russia, have gathered in Paris for talks about the threat posed by the terrorist group Islamic State. (Aussie ABC; original) Is the ‘have’ pronounced? It seems ...
4
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1answer
269 views

Is “Whore” archaic in Australian English?

Is the term "Whore", either to mean someone who is promiscuous, or someone who is a sex worker, archaic in Australian English? When I see the word "Whore", I tend to think of Shakespeare (along with ...
3
votes
1answer
390 views

Is “Sausage sizzle” only used for charity events?

In Australian or New Zealand English, is the term "Sausage sizzle" only used for charity events, as opposed to a BBQ that you're having with friends? Wikipedia has an entry on sausage sizzle, but I ...
3
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0answers
26k views

How do I indicate a unit number in an Australian postal address? [closed]

How do you indicate a unit number when writing the postal address of snail mail? Australia Post's Addressing guidelines does not mention how to indicate unit numbers. Wikipedia states that for a ...
13
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3answers
5k views

Should “bring a plate” be taken literally?

When someone is told to "bring a plate" to a picnic in Australia, does it literally mean just bring a plate? Or should they be bringing something else as well?