Questions tagged [bare-infinitives]

For questions about the usage of the base form of a verb without using "to". For questions about the base form of a verb using "to", see "to-infinitives".

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12 votes
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Using bare infinitive after 'does'

All he does is watching TV. I said this sentence and my native friend corrected me and said 'you need to use bare infinitive here' All he does is watch TV. Why is this right while the other is ...
Yuri's user avatar
  • 7,573
12 votes
1 answer
979 views

Bare infinitive vs to-infinitive

I found these sentences in my book: He did nothing but cry. He had no choice but to obey. Example #1 uses a bare infinitive ("cry"), but example #2 uses a to-infinitive ("to obey&...
starun008's user avatar
  • 1,725
9 votes
3 answers
978 views

Should I use "to work" or just "work"?

I'm intending to ask a question whether a person starts to work at seven or half past seven. Should I use: Do you start to work at 7 or half past seven? or Do you start work at 7 or half past ...
Ivan Sivak's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
4k views

In the sentence "I have never seen it snow", what tense is the verb "snow"? [duplicate]

In the sentence "I have never seen it snow", what tense is the verb "snow"? My coworker who is learning English asked me why "I have never seen it snowed" is incorrect, and I wasn't sure how to ...
Agargara's user avatar
  • 201
6 votes
1 answer
7k views

When to omit "to" with infinitives

I want you to feel better I want you feel better That was the right thing to do That was the right thing do when somebody challenges you to dance when somebody challenges you dance I'm not ...
Amish Aa's user avatar
  • 1,353
6 votes
3 answers
932 views

Can the subject be an adjective phrase, adverb phrase, or a bare infinitival clause?

This is an exercise in Chapter 5 of a textbook by Bas Aarts, English Syntax and Argumentation, 4th edition, published 2013, on page 88: In previous editions of this book I allowed for adjective ...
Sally's user avatar
  • 61
5 votes
1 answer
1k views

"A myth come true." Is the base form of "come" legitimate?

source: When selected Cyclops, ready for your orders. I see it all. Awaiting orders. A myth come true. Always on standby. Yes, commander? (https://moapyr.fandom.com/wiki/Cyclops_Walker/Quotes) ...
Zhang Jian's user avatar
  • 1,057
5 votes
4 answers
515 views

all you need to do is figure out - if "figure out" is changed to "to figure out", how does the meaning change?

Like most programming problems, if you understand the logic behind what you’re trying to accomplish, all you need to do is figure out a way of representing that logic with programming code. So let’s ...
Michael Rybkin's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
3k views

Using bare infinitive with verbs such as "see", "watch", etc.: Present tense or Past Tense?

I know using the bare infinitive after verbs such as hear, see, watch, etc. conveys a different meaning from using the present participle (verb+ing): I watched him climbing over the fence ( ...
Cardinal's user avatar
  • 6,025
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

"help robot population (to) adapt" -- can I omit "to"?

Actually I should be working on my bachelor report (it's due tonight), but hey, there are more important things like: Can I omit the to in the following sentence? ... foster behaviour that would ...
raysunshine's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

'He does more than just "fool" or "fooling" around?'

I've just read another question, “more than pack” or “more than packing”, and it made me curious. The reason of my curiosity is that even though I prefer the phrase "... finds sugar does more than ...
Damkerng T.'s user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
7k views

require that X be used VS. require X to be used

Some cities have a rule requiring that a certain percentage of the budget be used to fund public art. I am wondering the reason for being omitted the preposition to before used to.
nima's user avatar
  • 5,797
4 votes
2 answers
4k views

"I would rather did it myself" or "I would rather do it myself"?

Which of the following is the correct sentence: I would rather do it myself. I would rather did it myself. When I meant to say that I don't know how to do this work otherwise I am well ...
mamta's user avatar
  • 41
4 votes
1 answer
315 views

I can see a bear go over the river [duplicate]

A bear goes over the river. I can see a bear go over the river. Are the sentences above correct? If the sentence has "can", goes will become to go?
JJ12345's user avatar
  • 927
4 votes
4 answers
738 views

than+bare infinitive?

Can a bare infinitive come after ‘than’? The transportation industry has always done more than carry travelers from one destination to another. I think it would be appropriate to have “to carry” or “...
wannano's user avatar
  • 41
3 votes
1 answer
255 views

Why can "to" be or not be omitted in the following?

They acted as if they were mourning him rather than helping him (to) start a new life. The first step to help him was (to) give him a good education. You can omit to in the first sentence. But you ...
wyc's user avatar
  • 7,145
3 votes
1 answer
8k views

Let to do/ let do/ to let to do/ to let do

European customs officers are not easy to corrupt, so you have hardly any chances to get them __ something illegal across the border. A. let you to take B. let you take C. to let you to take D. to let ...
some1 here's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
1k views

what is the difference between - I make it to go and I make it go?

What is the difference between sentences like these: I make it to go. I make it go. or You make me to cry. You make me cry.
tadek's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes
1 answer
31k views

Is there a difference between "I saw him going..." and "I saw him go..."?

I saw him going to city. I saw him go to city. First one refers to gerund. Second one refers to infinite. Do they have the same meanings or different meanings?
I don't know who I am.'s user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
55 views

Is it “rather than letting” or ”let”?

I saw a question on an exercise book that read When someone is criticizing you, you can try to handle the criticism in a positive and productive way to improve yourself rather than ____ it lower your ...
kid's user avatar
  • 47
3 votes
1 answer
36 views

Infinitive function as adjective with be and without

I saw the following examples in a book: We have several new plants to be watered Maria still has several letters to write Do you have any money to spend ? Why in first case did an author use "to be" ...
Sergei Iashin's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
445 views

"all they did was (to) leave"

I've come across this sentence: [...] I've spent my all life making people happy when all they did was leave. Shouldn't it be "To leave" or something?
Jason O'Neil's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
108 views

Be + past simple verb

I was watching a video and I heard the narrator said: “She had requested his brain be studied” And I thought it was wrong, but some grammar correctors, like Grammarly, show that this is correct, my ...
Mary's user avatar
  • 111
2 votes
2 answers
316 views

A strange usage of a bare infinitive

Look upon this sentence please: "But again, truth be told, if you're looking for the guilty, you only need to look into a mirror." Why "be"? The sentence isn't in the subjunctive mood, because there'...
Abbasi's user avatar
  • 649
2 votes
2 answers
387 views

Get to followed by a gerund or an infinitive?

I got to poking around and I found this oyster. He gets to feeling ashamed of the showing he is making. The new neighbours got to know each other. I'd really like to see you again and get to know you ...
Abid's user avatar
  • 345
2 votes
2 answers
435 views

What's the grammar behind "[Noun/pronoun] + [be] + [gerund]"

I'm wondering what's the grammar behind phrases like: We be eating She be sleeping etc What are the grammar backgrounds for phrases in such form? Can there be any other use cases of such grammar ...
yakovenko-denis's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
100 views

Why is "be" used without a "to"

His uncle had always insisted the chosen successor be solidly grounded in the Amish church. How could the writer put be without preceding with verbs such as see, hear, watch, etc. Why he used "be"...
Bavyan Yaldo's user avatar
  • 3,047
2 votes
1 answer
92 views

have someone come or coming?

In the following, should "come" or "coming" be used? If only "come" is correct, why? The first sentence comes from a news story relating to the oldest dog in the world. ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,952
2 votes
1 answer
304 views

What do you mean by "ordinary preposition"?

I can't specifically figure out the meaning of ordinary preposition, especially with "to". When does verb + ing come after to? And when to + bare infinitive?
Bavyan Yaldo's user avatar
  • 3,047
2 votes
2 answers
92 views

"I was made to laugh"

We know that we use bare infinitive with certain verbs like make. I made him laugh. (Active voice) He was made to laugh by me. (Passive voice) Why is the bare infinitive used in the active voice ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
157 views

In the sentence "I watched the balloon rise", "rise" is in what verb tense? And why?

I watched the balloon rise. I understand that "rise" in this sentence is not in the 3rd person, because otherwise it would have "s" and it doesn't. Is it infinitive? The why not &...
Monica Vega's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
315 views

using bare infinitive after did

So according to rule we should use bare infinitive after modals and auxiliary verb do, so my question is that, is this sentence grammatically correct What he did was wrong. Or it should be What ...
user98725's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
629 views

Subject complement "Noun phrase + Be + (to) bare infinitive"

Is it right to use a bare infinitive as a subject complement as in the following quote? "Its true purpose is convince shoppers that your product is the preferred choice" Another example: "Their ...
Lahza's user avatar
  • 25
2 votes
2 answers
583 views

To + verb, bare verb or verb + ing in noun phrases

Which one is the correct verb form in the following sentence? The craziest thing I've ever done is go / to go / going scuba diving in Belize Some people say that both the to + verb and the ing ...
Lavinia Raspelli's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
40 views

Grammar help on "how...."

I wish to write a sentence to ask: How does the weight of a car affect the speed of it? Should I have affects or affect there?
JumpJump's user avatar
  • 336
2 votes
3 answers
1k views

How to determine whether "to" is needed or not?

"I can help improve your skills." "I can help to improve your skills." Which of this sentences is correct? How do you decide to put "to" or omit?
user18662's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
118 views

"the only thing you did today was breathe" vs. "the only thing you did today was TO breathe"

Sometimes it's okay if the only thing you did today was breathe. In this sentence, should I use a bare infinitive, 'breathe', or 'to breathe'? I think I should use a bare infinitive, otherwise ...
Shashwat Choudhary's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
8k views

Using "Did" should it be followed by past or present tense verb? [duplicate]

Did you woke up this morning and looked at the mirror, and notice the eye bags are puffer than ever?
Richie Paderes Adams's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
98 views

makes the high cost of convenience "seem" - should it be "seems"

I had read a sentence in a magazine: Staying connected is what makes the high cost of convenience—an average of $3,300 a year for the Moore's plan—seem well worth it to them. Should "...
CYC's user avatar
  • 3,009
1 vote
1 answer
26k views

"Let us know" or "Let us To know"? [duplicate]

Till today I thought that correct way is to say "let us to know", but today I received a formal email that was written there "Let us know", and that's why I'm here to check the issue. I would also ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
5k views

Is this "helped + make" combination a form of subjunctive?

I saw the following sentence on this page: https://www.inc.com/video/minda-zetlin/4-habits-that-helped-make-warren-buffett-a-billionaire.html 4 Habits That Helped Make Warren Buffett a Billionaire ...
user1764381's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
2k views

Three verbs in a row, how?

Let's go help repair his car. How can three verbs go in a row like this, without the subject? I thought grammatically it should be: Let's go help him repair his car.
SovereignSun's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
1k views

Which form is suitable: "fall" "falling" or "a fall"?

I hear a book fall. I hear a book falling. I hear a fall of a book. Which version is most natural?
Joe Kim's user avatar
  • 2,330
1 vote
1 answer
153 views

auxiliary verb or bare infinitive?

"She might have been waiting for us" ‘Have been waiting’ forms the present perfect progressive tense ‘might’ is a modal verb The verb that follows modal verbs is suppose to be a bare ...
some random girl's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
117 views

Infinitives with causitive verbs bid, command, order

1). I bade him go. 2). I ordered/commanded him to go. Till now I have thought bid, order and Command have almost same meaning except some nuances. But why Bare infinitive is used for bid and to-...
ramteja guthikonda's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
9k views

"help someone do" vs. "help someone to do" [duplicate]

Which sentence is correct and why? Could you help the carnivore cut his meat? Could you help the carnivore to cut his meat?
Abc Def's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
1 answer
267 views

Nothing but to be or nothing but be?

I am a bit confused whether bare Infinitive is used after 'but' or not. Which one is correct? We want nothing but to be free. We want nothing but be free.
Sandip Kumar Mandal's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
142 views

are the uses of 'bare infinitive' & 'participle' same here?

I saw him sing I saw him singing In the first example, the verb sing is used as a bare infinitive and in the following one it is exemplified as a present participle. My question is if both of them ...
rafi ur rashid's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
23 views

Is "run" in the past participle

That doesn’t mean lying down and becoming fooled, or letting foreign corporations run uncontrolled. I'm not sure about the structure. Is "run" the past participle or base form (bare ...
ForOU's user avatar
  • 1,505
1 vote
1 answer
64 views

Usage and meaning of sentences with WISH

I wish him to believe it. What is the exact meaning of this sentence? Does it mean “I wish he believes it”?
ramteja guthikonda's user avatar