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Questions tagged [canadian-english]

This tag is for questions related to the English language as spoken and written in Canada.

2
votes
1answer
36 views

meaning- a cat is a suck

People say this when a cat likes cuddling, eg. he's a big suck. I don't know the exact meaning. I couldn't find an appropriate meaning from dictionaries. Or maybe I'm looking up the wrong word (...
0
votes
1answer
151 views

“object” as a verb

In Canadian English does the correct use of the verb "object" have a "to" in front of it? Ex. '"object to war vs. object war", "I object to his statement" vs "object his statement". What is the "to" ...
3
votes
2answers
128 views

Has anyone seen or heard “kinked” used that way?

I just finished reading "Neuromancer" by William Gibson and wanted to ask you native speakers of the English language how his usage of the adjective / past participle "kinked" strikes you. Gibson ...
6
votes
3answers
64 views

How to use “without” from Microeconomics

When studying basic Microeconomics, I saw a sentence: it is not possible to make someone better off without making someone else worse off. Does it mean that it is no way to make you feel happy if ...
2
votes
2answers
237 views

Is Canadian English considered more as American En or as British English?

Is Canadian English considered more as American English or as British English or neither? I always thought that there are only British English and American English but recently I realized that there ...
0
votes
3answers
337 views

When should we use “these ones” vs “those ones”?

When we are talking about things we can say "these ones" or those ones". What is the difference in fact? For example if I want to point with a index finger on two things, should I say "those ones" ...
2
votes
2answers
43 views

“Even if” vs “although”

Are thoes two words used in different situation? Is there any examples that can explain the difference between two words?
1
vote
1answer
264 views

Canadian English “one beer, two beer, three beer …”

Is it true Canadian people say: "One beer, two beer, three beer..."? (As opposed to "one beer, two beers, three beers...")
1
vote
1answer
3k views

What does the month “MA” stand for?

I have a box of chocolates that has a best before date of: "2015 MA 12". What does "MA" stand for? May? Or March? Which one?
4
votes
1answer
388 views

Why do Canadians say “eh” so often?

I find that many Canadians like to say "eh". I would like to know the following: Is this just a cultural thing? Is it improper grammar? Do any other places do this? Thanks in advance.
4
votes
1answer
4k views

going off to university — meaning?

Source: A Culips listener on Facebook recently requested that we do more interviews, so here’s another one! This time it’s our friend Jade who’s talking to you. In this episode, Andrew asks her ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Have somebody doing something?

What does this mean if a standing comedian says I can't have you guys being a.. umm.. English audience and going "Oh hmm hmm" This is from 3:30 of https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIE1xkF8RZE I ...
2
votes
1answer
221 views

Why do we pronounce “slurp” with ə, but “slump” with ʌ?

Why do we pronounce slurp as /sləːp/ or /slɜ:p/ (BrE) or /slɝ:p/ (AmE) (Cambridge Dictionary of Pronunciation), but slump as /slʌmp/? Is it because of the presence of R?
11
votes
3answers
2k views

Do Canadians and Americans really use “gotten” as past participle when speaking?

The OALD has the following note about get: In spoken North American English the past participle got•ten /ˈɡɒtn/ /ˈɡɑːtn/ is almost always used. I know that I have got a car just means I have a car....
10
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “stove element” a common name for this object?

I read in a book it's called a oven stove element, and I used this word. But it might sound formal, is there another more common name for it? If not, what else is it called?