Skip to main content

Questions tagged [collocations]

A sequence of words or terms that co-occur more often than would be expected by chance (i.e., the statistically significant placement of particular words in a language).

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2 votes
2 answers
72 views

Alternatives for "abandon a habit"

Children used to go to libraries a lot 10 years ago when the internet wasn't that popular. But nowadays, they've abandoned that habit completely. I think that "abandon a habit" might not be ...
Phoebe's user avatar
  • 189
0 votes
2 answers
20 views

Does 'friendship' collocate with make?

One of my students wrote in a text "I made a friendship with you." That sounds odd to me. However, on ozdic.com it says that friendship would collocate with 'make.' My google search didn't ...
grasshopper's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
27 views

Is 'teach a school' in this context correct?

I am reading A woman makes a plan: advice for a lifetime of adventure, beauty, and success by Maye Musk, but I've never seen the use of 'teach' in 'teaching this modeling school' in this context: “...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,521
0 votes
1 answer
22 views

Is it correct to use the phrase"be with no access to X"?

Is it correct to say the below? She was hungry for knowledge but with no access to information. Or does it require using the verb, namely: She was hungry for knowledge but had no access to ...
Ania's user avatar
  • 89
2 votes
2 answers
695 views

Why is the question tag for this sentence in Cambridge Dictionary shown like this? --- He gave up his job, did he?

The following sentences are from Cambridge Dictionary along with the explanation: In questions in informal conversation, we can leave out a subject pronoun, or a subject pronoun and an accompanying ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,401
2 votes
1 answer
49 views

Odd one out–Is “a lush beach” so strange?

The exercise asks [emphasis mine]: Cross out one adjective which does not collocate with the noun   unspoilt / scenic / pebbly / rocky coastline   sandy / pebbly / tropical / rocky / lush beach As ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
42 views

Why saying "THERE is your present." when giving it, although the present is actually HERE (in her hand), not far away)?

The following sentence is from a native english speaking lady talking about Packaged Christmas presents. "There is your Christmas Present." ITV-Is Christmas packaging worth it (see:0:33-0:41)...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,401
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

"It was a stoney castle kind of thing." VS "It was kind of a stoney castle. --- Is the 1st sentence as valid as the 2nd one?

This is from a native speaker who is describing an imaginary house: "So, it was a stony, log cabin(y) castle kind of thing." Improve your english-Ronnie (see:2:58-3:13) Subtitles show ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,401
0 votes
0 answers
26 views

Reference regarding prepositional phrases and collocations

Does anyone know any good reference (books,lecture notes or webpages, preferably books or lecture notes) to study prepositional phrases and collocations? By "good" I mean a reference with ...
ferolimen's user avatar
  • 101
2 votes
2 answers
202 views

Do we say "put" a rental bike shop?

I can't come up with anything better than to set up a (specialist) shop in an area. Imagine a park up in the mountains where kids could do MTB (mountain biking?) a place that is accessible but lacking ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.3k
0 votes
0 answers
19 views

"This many frogs ......." VS "Such a lot of frogs......." VS "So many frogs ......."

This many frogs out on the slopes does not go unnoticed. Frogs race - BBC Earth (See:1:20-1:26) Instead of "this many", I tend to use: "Such a lot of frogs ....." "So many ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,401
0 votes
1 answer
65 views

first time meeting or to meet?

Christina Mifsud is a friend Jill knows through Internet connections, and this is their first time to meet in person. From Huffington Post It was my first time meeting some of them. From Huffington ...
Jones's user avatar
  • 614
0 votes
0 answers
71 views

Is it idiomatic to say someone is "obstinate about" something they don't want changed?

John is very obstinate about his choice of words. Above is a sentence I wrote about a person I know. He's a self-professed novelist who is very stubborn about his choice of words. When he wraps up a ...
Underwood's user avatar
  • 151
2 votes
1 answer
157 views

If we can “give someone a call”, why can't we “give a phone call”?

According to Cambridge Dictionary a phone call (also phonecall) is something that you make, and provides the following examples Will you excuse me? I need to make a phone call. I've got a few phone ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.3k
0 votes
1 answer
38 views

"slip free in one clean piece"

When she was five, Harumi lost her parents in a car crash. It was an uncanny collision; a truck crossed over the median into their lane. Harumi was in preschool, rehearsing for a school play. She had ...
hhhh's user avatar
  • 179
1 vote
1 answer
118 views

Using "What" instead of "How many"?

A model, while being filmed, is also getting her make-up. Vogue (see: 5:57-6:03) She says: "I have been gettin my makeup done for about, what, two hours?" When she is saying this, she can't ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,401
1 vote
1 answer
37 views

Can you say that a something meets certain limitations?

I couldn't find the phrase in any collocation dictionaries, but it does seem to be used occasionally, according to Google. For example: "Make sure that the configuration meets the following ...
Prilepinator's user avatar
8 votes
5 answers
4k views

'Rescuers had to wade waist-deep in floodwater.' Why not 'Rescuers had to wade in waist-deep floodwater.'?

Oxford's Collocations dictionary - 10th edition - for Android mobile app (licensed). wade verb ADVERB | PREPOSITION | PHRASES ADVERB slowly ashore The men waded ashore. across, back, out ...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
0 votes
1 answer
60 views

Is "covered wagons rolling access the prairies" wrong?

I am using Oxford's Dictonary Advanced learner + Oxford's Collocations dictionary - 10th edition - mobile application (licensed). I seen In my thought, it is covered wagons are rolling access the ...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
-1 votes
1 answer
43 views

How do you say you felt the same when someone said they were delighted: Do you say " "So, did I" OR "So was I."?

This is from a tv show Golden Ladies (see:13:21-13:25) The ladies are talking about their new neighbours(the McDowells) who were there and have just left. Blanch: Well, I think the McDowells were ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,401
2 votes
1 answer
357 views

What's the meaning of "Making demands on someone" in the following context?

She (Julie) spent her time doing little more than taking care of him (Mark) and the children. Now her sister was getting divorced and would doubtless be making demands on her too. Does it mean that ...
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar
8 votes
4 answers
1k views

Make or Do sushi?

I have seen both variants with "make / do sushi" (e.g. There’s a little Japanese place near my office, which does great sushi!). What is the difference or how should I choose make sushi or ...
Aynat's user avatar
  • 91
4 votes
3 answers
414 views

aggravate/exacerbate/heighten those disadvantages

You're not smart. You're not born into a wealthy family. And you don't have a lot of friends who can help you out financially. This lazy attitude will only aggravate those disadvantages. Hey, guys! ...
Underwood's user avatar
  • 151
0 votes
1 answer
115 views

Differences in job titles. "Manufacturing manager", "Production manager", "Manufacture manager"

I was given a piece of business card with a job title "Manufacture manager". I wonder any differences between a. "Manufacturing manager" b. "Production manager" c. "...
Stats Cruncher's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
537 views

Is 'Kay a shortened form of Okay?

This is from an interview by Vogue 73 questions with Cindy (see 03:01-03:06) The reporter asks questions to a celebrity. Right before one of the questions, he says: 'Kay Cindy, what is something that ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,401
16 votes
5 answers
3k views

Why "previously learned knowledge" is a natural phrase in English, although "learn knowledge" is not?

Learning transfer refers to the degree to which an individual applies previously learned knowledge and skills to new situations. - source I already know that the phrase "learn knowledge" ...
joy2020's user avatar
  • 1,056
1 vote
1 answer
57 views

Collocations for "world record": one can "break"/"set" a world record - what about "making" one?

Is it also possible to "make a world record"? Or just "setting" and "breaking" are possible? I found it in a google search but found nowhere else proof of it. Could you ...
E.V.'s user avatar
  • 399
4 votes
2 answers
98 views

renamed in 1946 as 7-Eleven

The preposition "as" is not normally used with the verb "renamed," is it? Why is it used in the following? To reflect their extended hours of operation, the stores were renamed in ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,996
0 votes
1 answer
88 views

Can "and" be used for the thousands place in sounded-out numbers? [duplicate]

Can "and" be used for the thousands place in sounded-out numbers? Or is it only restricted to the tens and ones places? For example: 9,300,000 => nine million and(?) three hundred ...
Vun-Hugh Vaw's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
475 views

The meaning of “grab a bite”

I have the following sentence in my textbook: Let’s grab a bite before we get down to work. (English Collocations in Use, Advanced, Exercise 1.4) At first, I thought that the meaning of “grab a bite”...
Azat Khabibulin's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
42 views

Is "providing with Ukraine" grammatically correct?

I heard John Kirby said this: “We have been, from the beginning of this war now 11 months ago, have been evolving the capabilities we’re providing with Ukraine, with the conditions on the ground,” I ...
Quique's user avatar
  • 600
1 vote
2 answers
159 views

Can you actually "make" a girlfriend or boyfriend?

I think I hear young people say this a lot but it sounds weird to my ear. I always say "dated/had" or "started to date/go out with". How acceptable and widely used is "make a ...
desmo's user avatar
  • 151
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Is "adapt to society" natural English?

I learned that "go into society" is not natural because we are born into society; we should say "go into the real world". How about "adapt to society"? If this is not ...
joy2020's user avatar
  • 1,056
3 votes
2 answers
62 views

at that time or of that time?

Hello in the following sentence can the preposition "of" work? Diamond rings date back to the Roman empire in 300BC. Diamonds ( ) that time were uncut and quite different. Is "at that ...
i cant write essays's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
62 views

Which one is correct? "stop doing a habit?" or "stop making a habit?"

Please help me clear up my confusion.. I haven't got the foggiest idea if my following phrases are correct, "this term is used to stop doing something, especially stop doing a bad habit." I ...
Abita Yay's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
2k views

"In the right direction" or "to the right direction" or "at the right direction"

May I know why "in" is used in this sentence: Tom asked Bill where the train station was? Bill told him north, pointing him in the right direction. Why does it not use : pointing him to ...
Sara2023's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
72 views

Because “away” and “from” have similar ideas, “away from” is a common collocation

se16teddy: English verbs of motion feel almost naked without a little adverb such as up, down, through, over or away, at least in conversational English. The prepositional phrase adds additional ...
Aaaaaaassssss's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
570 views

carry a message vs. convey a message [closed]

I'm wondering what the difference is between "carry a message" versus "convey a message". Can we use these two expressions interchangeably? Please, comment.I would be very grateful....
Piotr's user avatar
  • 187
2 votes
2 answers
2k views

"Take a job" vs. "take on a job" in context

Would you please tell me if there is any difference between take a job and take on a job in the context below? You laptop looks too damaged to be fixed, but let me ask if there is someone who would ...
Dmytro O'Hope's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
28 views

A helpful exercise for/to your abdomen

I know that we can say something is helpful to/for someone like in “This information would be extremely helpful for/to teenagers.” I wonder if it is okay to say something is helpful to/for something ...
Fire and Ice's user avatar
  • 1,304
0 votes
2 answers
167 views

"as between": a stylistic alternative for "between"?

This example presented below is from Saussure's Course in General Linguistics translated into English by Roy Harris. If words had the job of representing concepts fixed in advance, one would be able ...
magni's user avatar
  • 187
1 vote
1 answer
29 views

inheriting (a legacy of) cultural achievements

In this period, the indigenous Vietnamese culture developed while inheriting a legacy of cultural achievements from the previous period. The representative achievements of this period were Dong Son ...
Hai Duong's user avatar
  • 119
1 vote
1 answer
268 views

Overlook a mistake

The word overlook has a few meanings. Two of them sound close. to fail to see or notice (something) to pay no attention to (something) (Merriam-Webster's Dictionary) In the following sentence The ...
Englishfreak's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
34 views

Cause for/of in sentence

If one wants to say: The cause of/for his interest in ... was ... should one use of or for in this context As far as I understand from the previous research, it should be for as it is an outcome.
TheDuck's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
2 answers
40 views

Verb + a + noun (e.g. have a sit / take a look)

I'm not native speaker. I've heard of these expressions such as "take a look" or "have a sit." and I always wondering why people uses like that because we can just say "look ...
Hello's user avatar
  • 41
2 votes
1 answer
465 views

Is it idiomatic to say "ride subway lines"?

I hired a native speaker to improve my essay but she didn't change this sentence at all. I've only heard "ride the subway". Is it correct to say "ride subway lines"? Also, I ...
newbie forever's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
23 views

is there a collocation "have as a goal + Noun" [closed]

I came across the sentence below and I've never found that phrase which is bold. Formerly, person who retired from the world in order to form utopians had as their goal the setting up of perfect ...
Hello's user avatar
  • 41
1 vote
2 answers
158 views

to get a hired knife vs to get hired

I was reading the comic book Batman The Long Haloween and I came across a question involving the verb ''to get'' in the following excerpt: ''It seems like only yesterday when The Roman tried to get a ...
Southman's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
52 views

They Was Gonna - Colloquial Language

I heard some people saying "They was..." instead of "They were...". Also, it seems that this is usually used with gonna (e.g. They was gonna use it). Is this a common colloquial ...
Souhaib's user avatar
  • 57
0 votes
1 answer
91 views

What exactly does "She likes to go on the Internet in the evenings." mean?

I was looking for some internet vocabulary and I found this sentence on the Oxford Thesaurus which sounds very inespecific as compared to words like browse or surf when it comes to internet vocabulary....
Quique's user avatar
  • 600

1
2 3 4 5
8