Questions tagged [colloquial-language]

for questions about colloquial language. Colloquial language, colloquial dialect, or informal language is a variety of language commonly employed in conversation or other communication in informal situations.

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Meaning of “having a high game” [closed]

I know that there is an idiom "being at the top of their game". I wanted to know if this sentence makes any sense-Everybody here has a high emoji game. It's referring to people on a certain ...
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1answer
47 views

Is “there” often omitted in colloquial speech?

I am reading Post Office by Charles Bukowski. The writing style of the book is quite conversational and colloquial. This sentence came up in the book. I think he wanted to use the word “hygienics” ...
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34 views

Do these sentences have the same meaning: “I don't think he is a student.” and “I think he is not a student.”

1-"I don't think he is student." 2- "I think he is not a student." The speaker has the opinion that "he is not a student". But in order to say this in English, we make up ...
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2answers
31 views

“is you” or “you”

I have seen an interview with Justin Bieber, and there he said, “I just love the fact that what you do so brilliantly is you create such an amazing atmosphere for me,” and so I have a question. Why ...
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0answers
35 views

“How are you doing?” Why do we answer “good” instead of “well”?

When someone asks me "How are you doing?" Why do we answer "good" instead of "well" (adv. for doing) ?
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1answer
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Is there a word referring to something that motivates you?

One of my pupils wanted to express that there is a song that gives him motivation to create things. He referred to the song as a "kicker". I looked the word kicker up and the OED says it ...
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1answer
31 views

What does “block” mean in “That chemical-engineering block…”?

What is the meaning of the word "block" in the following context? Is it logical that anybody should be expected to be afraid of the work that they feel they were put on this Earth to do. ...
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2answers
26 views

Is “it’s like men’s shirts” an idiomatic expression?

I came across the expression on a JapanToday webpage. Why it's hard to make vaccines and boost supplies "We think, well, OK, it’s like men’s shirts, right, I’ll just have another place to make ...
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Do the British use words like “batso” or “nutso”?

Today I encountered the word "batso" and I understood from context it meant "crazy". It interested me because it sounds like an Italian word "pazzo" which means "...
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1answer
28 views

What is the colloquial way to say one will log into one of those famous streaming video services to choose any TV show to watch?

I am not sure whether "put on" is the right one as I am getting anything inside a DVD player or any other device. Nor I do believe the verb play is suitable in this particular case. Here are ...
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3answers
728 views

“What you've been doing?” and “What have you been doing?” Are they both the correct way to ask?

Can I ask someone: "What you've been doing?" with proper intonation? Will it be considered ok the same as "What have you been doing?"?
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meaning of “you wanna know”

In conversation, Hagrid said "first thing you wanna know about hippogriffs is that they are very proud creatures. you do not want to insult a hippogriff." I think nobody said to him like &...
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2answers
100 views

“What do you mean?” vs “what you mean?”

I looked it up online and came across the same question asked on different forums online, and all the answers say the only correct way is "what do you mean?", as a stand alone question. But ...
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47 views

Response to “How you doing?”?

What is a natural response to "Good to see you. How you doing?"? Will a natural response include "doing" as in "I'm doing okay" or will "I'm okay" be more ...
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2answers
147 views

“I am cooking”, “I have to cook”, “I am going to cook”, and “I will cook”

I have a situation. I am watching the TV at noon, then I make a telephone call with my husband for a while, then it is time to cook. Which of these is correct? I am cooking (now), bye. I have to cook ...
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Well done you legend!

Well done you legend! When I translate this phrase, it looks little exaggerated. What does exactly this phrase mean? Can I use this phrase in a serious content or can I only use it in just a casual ...
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1answer
29 views

“Didn't have no” or “didn't have any”?

I have a question about whether "I didn't have no plans" is correct or not, since I think that it's a double negation and therefore not correct, so it should be "I didn't have any plans&...
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1answer
30 views

Growing up/ From a young age

"From a young age we aren't taught to help others. Growing up we are taught to play it safe and avoid risk at all cost." Are the sentences correct? I'm not sure about 'from a young age' and ...
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1answer
61 views

How to ask a restaurant if they provide take out

If I go into a restaurant, and I'd like to know if they provide orders to go/take out? Can I say: "Hi, can I take out?" or "Hi, I'd like to order to go?" Also, I'd like to know ...
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1answer
40 views

Gives me the creeps

Does 'gives me the creeps' mean that someone/something scares you? Or does it mean something more than just to be scared?
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63 views

Grab or pick up?

Gaming on consoles is more convenient than computers. You can just pick up/grab your controller and start playing right away. Can you grab/pick up some chips from the grocery store? Do 'grab' and '...
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1answer
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What is a less vulgar way of referring to someone's posterior? [duplicate]

What is the least vulgar but still natural (not overly formal) of these: Bum, bottom, backside, behind, rear end... As she walked past him, he stared at her _________.
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21 views

The feeling you get/the feeling when

The feeling you get when your students get good grades is out of this world. The feeling when your students get good grades is out of this world. I'm confused between 'the feeling you get' and 'the ...
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2answers
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Make the comeback

I was talking about the time I hurt myself and had to stop going to the gym and how I recovered and started lifting again. I said: "The only thing that helped me to make the comeback was his ...
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1answer
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Those/this kind of thing

I was asked about whether I'd like to go on a vacation or stay home and relax. While answering it I said: "I prefer staying home and relaxing. I like to have a cup of coffee, take a hot shower. ...
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1answer
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They say that it's not for nothing that= People say?

I was asked whether I agree that the best things in life come as a result of hard work and repeated failure. I said: "I believe that it's not for nothing that they say that failure is the pillar ...
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2answers
61 views

Most South Asians have a Toyota/Toyotas

Most South Asians have a Toyota/Toyotas. All of them have a red car/red cars. It put a smile in their face/faces. Both of them have a baby boy/baby boys. In these sentences I'm not sure if I should ...
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2answers
37 views

I love (the) rainy season(s)

To mean 'rainy/winter/summer seasons' in general do we say: I love the rainy/winter/summer season, or I love rainy/winter/summer seasons.
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Colloquial English listening comprehension [closed]

I'm trying to improve my listening comprehension especially with those colloquial/slang style every day English, please lend me a ear on these tricky parts. And so, it's a CustomerModel and we'll ...
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1answer
60 views

Why were some English phrases written in double negatives when the speaker actually wants to express a single negative? [duplicate]

For example, I just saw this phrase on social media: The way 2020 going, I ain't buyin' no PS5. I mean, in this instance, I can ultimately see that what the poster actually mean is that "I ain'...
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Use of “constellation” to mean “situation”

I was reading this question on the Personal Finance and Money site: How close is the fate of Berkshire Hathaway tied to Warren Buffett? Will Berkshire Hathaway remain a good investment in the long ...
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1answer
40 views

Can the verb inform be intransitive and used in the sense of making somebody aware of something? And is it colloquial?

She informed she had no idea who had committed that robbery. A friend of mine said this. I'm not sure if it's correct usage of the verb inform because I think it should be followed by an object (...
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2answers
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Is it right to say “you wanna join?” to invite someone to join me for the activity

Is it right to say "you wanna join?" to invite someone to join me for the activity? Is it causal English or not grammatical at all. thanks. I know it's correct to say "you wanna join me?...
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1answer
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Eat both soup and meat with potatoes?

What is colloquial? Meat with potatoes or Meat and potatoes. (Meaning cooked potatoes and meat mixed in one dish, perhaps with some savory dressing) UPDATE: It seems you can say "meat and ...
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2answers
198 views

Come up to the third floor

When telling someone which floor they have to come to do we say: Come up to the third floor. To ask someone which floor I'm supposed to de we say: Which floor is it on?/ Which floor do I come? I ...
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480 views

Which combination of words sounds natural?

I wonder which construction / combination is the most natural and colloquial (please mention your area when answering the question) and which is outright unnatural and wrong? There is a store /shop ...
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1answer
23 views

I was toxic MYSELF

I've tried looking up 'myself' but the only results I get is 'myself or by myself.' But my problem is a bit different. I was talking about a few toxic friends who I used to play video games with and I ...
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10answers
5k views

What does the word “just” mean in this context?

It was written on a T-shirt: "Do not disturb. Just don't." What does "just" mean here? Does it mean that all I want is that you don't disturb? There is a difference of opinion ...
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2answers
168 views

“is gonna finish” vs. “is finishing”

I was being in a class. The professor was lecturing. A friend sent me a WhatsApp message What are you doing? I need your help. I replied Is it Urgent? I'm being in a class which is gonna finish in ...
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Is this an order or a suggestion?

So, I have been with a friend shopping. After we bought almost everything, I have seen some shoes and I wanted to suggest him nicely then he can get some this shoes. He answered me rudely that he is ...
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2answers
195 views

two-fifty will get you on the E train

There's a case in which a woman fell into the water. A key witness is missing. The female officer wants to focus on the case itself, but another male officer wants to focus on finding the missing ...
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3answers
580 views

Is it common to say “it's not your call”?

I’m pretty sure that the following expression is quite common to have someone else make the decision in everyday speaking. It's your call. Ngram Viewer justifies it. The graph also indicates that ...
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“To be” is used as the infinitive: “He be like…”, “Work be hard”,

I often see, of course, in colloquial contects, that the word "be" is used like "is" or "are" and so on. E.g.: "I be very happy then", "School be like...&...
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Are these all idiomatic phrases regarding turning to a certain age and do they mean the same?

I'll be 18 tomorrow. I'm turning 18 tomorrow. I'll turn 18 tomorrow. I will be turning 18 tomorrow. I'm going to turn 18 tomorrow. Are these all idiomatic phrases regarding turning to a certain age ...
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2answers
813 views

What do you call a person who cares about personal well-being, hygiene and fitness?

In colloquial English, what a person who cares about personal well-being, hygiene and fitness, is called? if there are words which refer to just one or two aspects please mention them too. (Looking ...
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190 views

Is 'haven't a clue' slang? and do people all over the world use it or is it just a British thing, or is it used by a smaller group of people?

Just wondering as I always use it and people often ask me what I'm talking about. So it got me thinking that it might just be a British thing, or maybe even just a thing people from the country ...
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Why do native speakers sometimes call some one 'name + boy'?

I've heard male native speakers call their male friends by their name + boy. For example, a man's name is David, and a male friend of his once said to him 'Hey David boy...' And I've heard another ...
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1answer
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How do I have students open their books at a specific page by speaking

Imagine I am teaching in a classroom and trying to have students open their books at a specific page. Should I say this or something else? dear students, please turn to page 35 and look at figure ...
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Does “there are” pronounce /ðer/ in spoken American?

An American tutorial teaches reduced speaking, where "there are" sounds like /ðer/, am I hearing correctly? Do Americans speak that way in real life?
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As a student, how do I answer “do you have any questions”?

Consider this conversation in an online classroom Teacher: "do you have any questions in this section?" Student: "No" Is the answer a little bit impolite? How about this one? Student: "No ...

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