Questions tagged [colloquial-language]

for questions about colloquial language. Colloquial language, colloquial dialect, or informal language is a variety of language commonly employed in conversation or other communication in informal situations.

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2answers
35 views

Most South Asians have a Toyota/Toyotas

Most South Asians have a Toyota/Toyotas. All of them have a red car/red cars. It put a smile in their face/faces. Both of them have a baby boy/baby boys. In these sentences I'm not sure if I should ...
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2answers
30 views

I love (the) rainy season(s)

To mean 'rainy/winter/summer seasons' in general do we say: I love the rainy/winter/summer season, or I love rainy/winter/summer seasons.
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1answer
40 views

Colloquial English listening comprehension [closed]

I'm trying to improve my listening comprehension especially with those colloquial/slang style every day English, please lend me a ear on these tricky parts. And so, it's a CustomerModel and we'll ...
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1answer
59 views

Why were some English phrases written in double negatives when the speaker actually wants to express a single negative? [duplicate]

For example, I just saw this phrase on social media: The way 2020 going, I ain't buyin' no PS5. I mean, in this instance, I can ultimately see that what the poster actually mean is that "I ain'...
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6answers
1k views

Use of “constellation” to mean “situation”

I was reading this question on the Personal Finance and Money site: How close is the fate of Berkshire Hathaway tied to Warren Buffett? Will Berkshire Hathaway remain a good investment in the long ...
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1answer
25 views

Can the verb inform be intransitive and used in the sense of making somebody aware of something? And is it colloquial?

She informed she had no idea who had committed that robbery. A friend of mine said this. I'm not sure if it's correct usage of the verb inform because I think it should be followed by an object (...
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2answers
193 views

Is it right to say “you wanna join?” to invite someone to join me for the activity

Is it right to say "you wanna join?" to invite someone to join me for the activity? Is it causal English or not grammatical at all. thanks. I know it's correct to say "you wanna join me?...
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1answer
33 views

Eat both soup and meat with potatoes?

What is colloquial? Meat with potatoes or Meat and potatoes. (Meaning cooked potatoes and meat mixed in one dish, perhaps with some savory dressing) UPDATE: It seems you can say "meat and ...
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2answers
61 views

Come up to the third floor

When telling someone which floor they have to come to do we say: Come up to the third floor. To ask someone which floor I'm supposed to de we say: Which floor is it on?/ Which floor do I come? I ...
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0answers
24 views

Which combination of words sounds natural?

I wonder which construction / combination is the most natural and colloquial (please mention your area when answering the question) and which is outright unnatural and wrong? There is a store /shop ...
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1answer
21 views

I was toxic MYSELF

I've tried looking up 'myself' but the only results I get is 'myself or by myself.' But my problem is a bit different. I was talking about a few toxic friends who I used to play video games with and I ...
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0answers
18 views

Non of these/those marriages lasted very long

I get confused every time I come across this/those like in the follwing: "We all know that he's a self-centered, egotistic, and and opinionated bast*rd. And it's not a secret. Even he knows ...
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10answers
4k views

What does the word “just” mean in this context?

It was written on a T-shirt: "Do not disturb. Just don't." What does "just" mean here? Does it mean that all I want is that you don't disturb? There is a difference of opinion ...
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2answers
38 views

“is gonna finish” vs. “is finishing”

I was being in a class. The professor was lecturing. A friend sent me a WhatsApp message What are you doing? I need your help. I replied Is it Urgent? I'm being in a class which is gonna finish in ...
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1answer
35 views

Is this an order or a suggestion?

So, I have been with a friend shopping. After we bought almost everything, I have seen some shoes and I wanted to suggest him nicely then he can get some this shoes. He answered me rudely that he is ...
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2answers
190 views

two-fifty will get you on the E train

There's a case in which a woman fell into the water. A key witness is missing. The female officer wants to focus on the case itself, but another male officer wants to focus on finding the missing ...
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3answers
30 views

Is it common to say “it's not your call”?

I’m pretty sure that the following expression is quite common to have someone else make the decision in everyday speaking. It's your call. Ngram Viewer justifies it. The graph also indicates that ...
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0answers
16 views

“To be” is used as the infinitive: “He be like…”, “Work be hard”,

I often see, of course, in colloquial contects, that the word "be" is used like "is" or "are" and so on. E.g.: "I be very happy then", "School be like...&...
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0answers
25 views

Are these all idiomatic phrases regarding turning to a certain age and do they mean the same?

I'll be 18 tomorrow. I'm turning 18 tomorrow. I'll turn 18 tomorrow. I will be turning 18 tomorrow. I'm going to turn 18 tomorrow. Are these all idiomatic phrases regarding turning to a certain age ...
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2answers
35 views

What do you call a person who cares about personal well-being, hygiene and fitness?

In colloquial English, what a person who cares about personal well-being, hygiene and fitness, is called? if there are words which refer to just one or two aspects please mention them too. (Looking ...
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1answer
28 views

Is 'haven't a clue' slang? and do people all over the world use it or is it just a British thing, or is it used by a smaller group of people?

Just wondering as I always use it and people often ask me what I'm talking about. So it got me thinking that it might just be a British thing, or maybe even just a thing people from the country ...
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0answers
28 views

Why do native speakers sometimes call some one 'name + boy'?

I've heard male native speakers call their male friends by their name + boy. For example, a man's name is David, and a male friend of his once said to him 'Hey David boy...' And I've heard another ...
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1answer
13 views

How do I have students open their books at a specific page by speaking

Imagine I am teaching in a classroom and trying to have students open their books at a specific page. Should I say this or something else? dear students, please turn to page 35 and look at figure ...
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0answers
31 views

Does “there are” pronounce /ðer/ in spoken American?

An American tutorial teaches reduced speaking, where "there are" sounds like /ðer/, am I hearing correctly? Do Americans speak that way in real life?
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2answers
153 views

As a student, how do I answer “do you have any questions”?

Consider this conversation in an online classroom Teacher: "do you have any questions in this section?" Student: "No" Is the answer a little bit impolite? How about this one? Student: "No ...
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0answers
26 views

“follow the tutorial” vs. “follow along the tutorial”

From a tutorial Follow along the tutorial to build an automotive user interface and create a #UI like that of your very own embedded device! Ngram Viewer shows writers only use "follow the ...
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0answers
35 views

Do native speakers say “you're way too late” in real life?

Google gives About 663,000 results for "you're way too late", some comes from lyrics, some are in a story. Do native speakers say it in real life? Imagine that, it's 8 o'clock AM. My son is still ...
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0answers
23 views

“thought I'd/wanted to”

A man walks up to a woman at the bar in a bar and they fall into conversation. He squeezes into the conversation that he's a lawyer. The conversation goes on. At some point in the conversation he ...
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1answer
42 views

“Will see” vs “We'll see”

In Russian, there's a phrase meaning 'We will see in what something will end up'. Literally, that is the form of the Russian verb see put in 2Sg. Is there any colloquial phrase which has the same ...
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2answers
42 views

Is it colloquial to say “You like to wear Elsa, don't you?”?

Your child likes to wear shorts or Tshirts that have pictures of Elsa on them (see the picture). Is it colloquial to say "You like to wear Elsa, don't you?" or "You are in Elsa now" the same way ...
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1answer
31 views

“I'm not too sure” colloquial?

I've heard people saying "I'm not too sure" on the internet. I guess it means the same as "I'm not very sure". Is such a usage of the word "too" actually colloquial or could you also use it in a ...
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2answers
44 views

A sh*t that's not bowel movement

My gf sent me a message "My sister is showing me a sh*t." Is that a correct way to write a sentence that doesn't talk about fecal matter? It stood out as weird to me, but I don't know the official ...
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1answer
22 views

does the phrase “to get all sad” is used anywhere? If so, can you give me an example?

I am translating a short story from Turkish to English and in one of the places where the emotions are supposed to be really intense I cannot achieve the same meaning, at least I think I don't. In the ...
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2answers
54 views

Trend in usage “irregardless of” vs "regardless of'

We see in US English a trend towards saying "irregardless of" in place of "regardless of". The trend is discernible on Google Ngram since 1980. Even "educated" writers in US use it. I don't see it at ...
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2answers
59 views

What a granny is supposed to say to respond to “Thank You”?

A post gives "8 Ways to Respond to Thank You". I didn't find one is appropriate the following situation. Imagine that, a granny prepares a breakfast for her grandson. Grandson: thank you, granny. ...
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1answer
42 views

“Bop the fizz” - what's the meaning?

What is the meaning of "bop the fizz" in this sentence? What kind of question is it? "hey who wants to go for lunch?" is a different question from "hey could you bop the fizz for Bigclient?" The ...
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4answers
97 views

The history of the word “gay” [closed]

When did the word "gay" which initially had a meaning "merry" and "happy" gain another connotation which is now thought to be preliminary? As I understand, the word in the main old meaning was an ...
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2answers
4k views

The difference between Such thing, such a thing, a such thing

Such thing. Such a thing. A such thing. Are all of them grammatically correct? What's the difference between them?
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1answer
60 views

Relative order of social acceptance of alternate forms of the 'N' word

The word 'nigga' has been around for sometime now in our daily lingo, and from what I understand, it's okay for people of the African American community to use it within, but it's extremely offensive ...
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5answers
3k views

Someone said to me, “We basically literally did.” What were they trying to express to me?

Someone said to me, "We basically literally did." What were they trying to express to me? Also, can basically and literally be used in the same sentence? My points to my language partner: ...
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2answers
253 views

Why do so many people say “equals to” in maths?

I hear a significant number of English-second-language speakers, English-first-language children, and less educated English-first-language peers, say x equals to three times sine alpha For example,...
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1answer
709 views

Differences between Going to and Will in Informal and Formal English

In formal English (or written English), I'm super sure that the Be going to and Will rules are "respected". (Correct me if I'm wrong) For example, probably in formal English, they probably use "Going ...
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1answer
57 views

What does ”libel schmibel” mean?

Libel schmibel. The dead can't sue. What does “libel schmibel” mean? Another word to say it?
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2answers
65 views

A similar term to “paga fantas”

In my country, we use the informal term "paga fantas" which refers to a man who buys stuff or is willing to get anything for a girl with the intent of seducing her. In some particular cases, a man ...
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1answer
35 views

Is the following omission of “it was” permissible in colloquial English?

Bringing up the question wasn't as hard as he'd thought. (It was) Definitely easier than the letter he'd have to write later. I tried to find a similar example on Google Books. Unfortunately, ...
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5answers
5k views

Is it alright to say good afternoon Sirs and Madams in a panel interview?

I will be attending a panel interview (with two men and two women). I don't know their names. I want to be more polite, but I am not sure whether it is alright to say Good afternoon, sirs and ...
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1answer
29 views

“Blow” in a conversation

Can "Blow" be used by itself to mean "Blow something up all out of proportion?" As in: She was written off as Blowing it (a situation) in an attempt to implicate him. (Made up example)
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1answer
32 views

A joke about explanation and understanding

I want to translate a short joke into English. The result doesn't sound natural, though I guess the idea is pretty clear. How would you rephrase it to sound more colloquial and natural? Two ...
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1answer
1k views

“I want to just say…” vs “I just want to say…”

What's the difference? Are they really different, with a nuance, or is it just a matter of preference? Does one point to your level of fluency more than the other? Made up examples. "I just want to ...
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1answer
381 views

what does mean by “getting kicked in the head”?

the context as blow: Since my mom taught there, I would no longer have to ride the bus with a bunch of rowdy boys and worry about stuff like getting kicked in the head. No kidding ----they actually ...