Questions tagged [colloquial-language]

for questions about colloquial language. Colloquial language, colloquial dialect, or informal language is a variety of language commonly employed in conversation or other communication in informal situations.

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Is there colloquial way to express "X will be aired on TV"?

How can I express "X will be on TV" in daily conversation? For example, I want to express a movie/football match etc. will be aired on TV starting from 21:00. Are there more colloquial ...
sundowner's user avatar
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When you are using your laptop for your personal things, and someone ask you what are you doing how do you reply?

If I say I'm working on my laptop, most people think I'm working from home. While I'm doing stuff like checking emails and paying bills or preparing some documents that are not work related. How do ...
Real Dreams's user avatar
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Why is the question tag for this sentence in Cambridge Dictionary shown like this? --- He gave up his job, did he?

The following sentences are from Cambridge Dictionary along with the explanation: In questions in informal conversation, we can leave out a subject pronoun, or a subject pronoun and an accompanying ...
Yunus's user avatar
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Are "All right, so ....." and "So, yeah, ....." interchangeable when we start to talk about a subject?

"So yeah,...." "All right, so..." I sometimes hear these two expressions being used when people start talking about something to other people. For example, I hear that some ...
Yunus's user avatar
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Verb followed by 3 prepositions: ".......looking out across through their eyes ...... | Is this a slip of tongue or something else?

Most people, when they think about themselves, have this experience or this very powerful phenomena that they exist inside their heads, sort of looking out across through their eyes, controlling their ...
Yunus's user avatar
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What does "up" mean in "Up the Terriers"?

I notice the sports writer say “Up the Terriers” for a British football team. What does "up" exactly mean? Hull City 0-0 Huddersfield Town Town get things going. Up the Terriers. Twitter
Nyambek's user avatar
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Is it my ears or is it the narrator pronouncing"...JAGGED CLIFFS" something like ".... JAG IL TIFFS."?

Cornered, the seals keep close to the jagged cliffs. BBC (see:1:19-1:23) I listened to it more than 10 times and suprised to hear the "...jagged cliffs" was pronounced something like ".....
Yunus's user avatar
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" How much before?" VS "How earlier" VS "How much earlier?"

I imagined myself talking to a doctor in English, so I made up this conversation. A: You should take this medicine before the meals. B: ................? (Here, I need a question that would require ...
Yunus's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
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"Do you want there to be?" VS "Do you want there was?"

On TV, a physicist is talking about space, planets, etc. He tells about anything related to space in a very loving way. So, when it comes to whether there will be a civilization in space, the ...
Yunus's user avatar
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How do you say you felt the same when someone said they were delighted: Do you say " "So, did I" OR "So was I."?

This is from a tv show Golden Ladies (see:13:21-13:25) The ladies are talking about their new neighbours(the McDowells) who were there and have just left. Blanch: Well, I think the McDowells were ...
Yunus's user avatar
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The idiomatic antonyms of "keep someone in the loop"?

In this thread I realized that 'loop someone in' does not fit in the scenario of inviting someone into a WhatsApp group for an intermittent discussion, and the idiomatic expression should be 'keep ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
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Is it all right to say "one one hundred" when you actually mean to say "one percent"?

This is from BBC about space and planets Space questions (see:27:05-27:40) The presenter says; "Its atmosphere is one one hundred the pressure of Earth." which doesn't make sense. However, ...
Yunus's user avatar
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6 votes
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Asking about future life or job

To ask a child or a teen about their future job, should one ask: "What would you like to be later?" or "What would you like to do later?"
zenith3's user avatar
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"We have been down this street already." OR ""We have been to this street already."

This is from a British film Anybod's nightmare see:46:33-46:35 Two people in a car are looking for a place by looking at a map while driving. They can't agree on whether they are on the right street, ...
Yunus's user avatar
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How to express "stupid/fool/dumb brother" in a friendly way? [closed]

I vaguely remember in the past I heard a father said with a smile, "My stupid boy/son, it is a cat, not a dog." In this context, the father was not scolding his son. It's spoken in a ...
Gqqnbig's user avatar
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Is this grammatically incorrect to say "honestly, I feel like a child myself sometimes"?

Is it grammatically incorrect to say: honestly, I feel like a child myself sometimes Is the rule "never use myself with feel" relevant here?
cunning fox's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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"That's graduation sorted". What type of grammar is used here?

That's graduation sorted. Context: Speakers talk about the way they want to organise their graduation ceremony and finally find the perfect solution for that. Even though I get the gist, I don't ...
cunning fox's user avatar
12 votes
5 answers
9k views

What does "you better" mean in this context of conversation?

The following is a excerpt from an interview script on Linux Journal: Guid: ... If you talk to people, they all think Windows stinks and UNIX is the one true operating system. Phil: I think that too!...
catwith's user avatar
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How do I Americanize "Fat lot of good X will do you"?

I learned British English, but I work exclusively with Americans. I'll often say "Fat lot of good X did for us", and I get confused looks from others. For example, the other day, I said &...
AndreasKralj's user avatar
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Can we "go to a movie"? Is it grammatical?

Please tell me, can I say "I go to a movie (I mean a film)"? Because we go to a place not to a film. I saw this sentence in "Tactics for listening": I went to a really dumb movie. ...
Sara2023's user avatar
2 votes
4 answers
2k views

If someone says "That hair tho", does it have a positive or a negative meaning?

I've seen this many times on social media and I can't decide whether it has good or bad meaning. Here is an example from twitter of a picture of a person with the statement saying BREAKING: CANTOR ...
Marah Elwani's user avatar
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2 answers
625 views

Meaning of “on the low side”

I was talking to a recruiter and she said that “ your maths skill is a bit on the low side”. Did she mean that my maths is very low in the score distribution of all candidates (i’m thinking about the ...
lancelot's user avatar
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Is it correct to answer the question “who is there?” by “I”?

Somebody on quora stated that “I.” is a possible answer to the question “Who is there?”, making “I.” the shortest English sentence whatsoever. I'm not a native speaker but wouldn't the natural answer ...
yannis's user avatar
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1 answer
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They Was Gonna - Colloquial Language

I heard some people saying "They was..." instead of "They were...". Also, it seems that this is usually used with gonna (e.g. They was gonna use it). Is this a common colloquial ...
Souhaib's user avatar
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which of "the pizza wasn't quite up there with the rest" or "the pizza left something to be desired" more natural to say? [closed]

The chicken and pasta were delicious. They were excellent. However, the ______________. (a) the pizza wasn't quite up there with the rest (b) the pizza wasn't quite on par with the rest (c) the pizza ...
하하호호's user avatar
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1 answer
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'Unhide' Is Commonly Used, Why Doesn't It Appear on Any Vocabulary?

I noticed that the word 'unhide' it's widely used, though a quick research on multiple vocabularies didn't bring anything relevant up. This word is extremely common in IT when talking about files, for ...
Alex F.'s user avatar
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Is it natural to say "exchange contacts"?

Example: She wanted to exchange contacts with him. (e.g. email, instant messaging, phone number.) Is it natural to use this phrase? As a short way of saying: "exchange contact information?"...
wyc's user avatar
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Stepped into the kitchenette [closed]

Can you use into (rather than to) when talking about a kitchenette—even though a kitchenette isn't a place that you enter? Note: Google Ngrams says that "stepped into the kitchenette" is way ...
wyc's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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Stepped out onto the balcony

"Stepped out onto the balcony" is more common than "stepped out to/into the balcony." Why is "onto" used even though, usually, the floor of a balcony isn't higher than ...
wyc's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
27 views

Why is "that" more suitable in the following?

"If I lie to you, I'll lose your trust forever. That's/it's the last thing I want." "I'll search for Mary. That/it was my original plan anyway." I know "that" is more ...
wyc's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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isn't going anywhere vs. [pronoun]'s not going anywhere

he's not going anywhere has 49,600 results. he isn't going anywhere has 5,650 results. (I performed a similar search in a private library, and the difference was more or less the same.) Is the second ...
wyc's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
128 views

"Drinking coffee," "haven't had coffee," etc

"Drinking coffee" is more common than "having coffee" on Google Books. "Haven't had coffee" is way more common than "haven't drunk coffee." "He'd had food&...
wyc's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
28 views

Live in a state/situation/circumstance

Do you think we can say someone is living in a situation/state/circumstance? If things are going bad in our life and we have bad life circumstances etc, can we say any of these sentences? I live in a ...
Fire and Ice's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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IWhat is the meaning of the beat in this paragraph?

I have been reading an essay about Joan Didion from New Yorker (https://www.newyorker.com/culture/postscript/joan-didion-and-the-voice-of-america) I would like to ask multiple questions in this essay. ...
Changwan Sun's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
43 views

"to do good with change""

She doesn’t do good with change, so we try to keep the routine in the house to avoid boosting her anxiety. It seems that “do good” is a synonym for “adapt/bear/accept” and the like. Can anyone ...
Diane Mik's user avatar
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2 answers
142 views

cheer up / buck up / perk up /. Which makes more sense in the given context?

Not only did I not get tired, I rather cheered up/perked up/bucked up. Not only did I not tire, rather I was/felt invigorated. Do any of these seem natural to you?
Let's user avatar
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-1 votes
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TA (Abbreviation, AmE) [closed]

Context: in a book, two college girls are talking about their lives in a quite colloquial, friendly tone. One of them says: "I made out with my girl TA last week". Does anyone know what &...
Repelús's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
315 views

Overtake, cut off usage

I have two questions: Relating to the usage of the word 'overtake'. Is this word common in colloquial English? If I say 'I overtook the truck in front of me', does this sound unnatural or very formal ...
userJu's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
16 views

Why is "struggled to process" more common than "struggled processing"?

In many cases, you'd write verb + gerund: His eyes stopped to sting/stinging after a while. Google Ngrams What is it an exception with the verbs struggle and process? He struggled to process/...
wyc's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
32 views

Is the following "what's" contraction similar to these other cases?

What's he doing? Is this "what's" contraction the same as: What's his last name? What's the last time he showered? Why or why not? I ask because the first sentence sounds a little ...
wyc's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
185 views

"Go back being friends" vs "go back to being friends."

Google Ngrams says that go back to being friends is a lot more common than go back being friends. Is the reason grammatical? Or there's another reason? (Or maybe they are equally correct?)
wyc's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
908 views

How do I respond when someone asks, “How do you feel about {food name - pizza, bowl of…} etc.”?

Question is specific to office environment. Is answering "I feel awesome" or "I would love to have that" good enough? Also, how to respond if you are not down for it or prefer ...
Prish's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
47 views

"How about you start tomorrow?"

Does this a common phrase? Or at least does it sound natural? I know this is quite common: "Okay, you have the job. How about starting tomorrow?" But I'm not sure about this: "Okay, ...
wyc's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
144 views

Can I say "Whatever You Did Do?"

I am writing a song about forgiveness and "It does not matter what you did do" perfectly fits into the rhyme scheme while "It doesn't matter what you did" does not. How awkward ...
Hannah's user avatar
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0 answers
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Which of the two sentences is grammatically correct on sounds natural?

I've been remembering this picture for as long I've been remembering myself. I've been remembering this picture since I've been remembering myself. Which sentence is right? I think they have the same ...
Let's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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“How do you not…”

How do you not doomscroll without turning a blind eye to the injustices happening around the world. Is the “how do you not” construction awkward/unnatural in a colloquial context? Also, does the ...
user143015's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
36 views

A little [noun/adjective] vs. a bit [noun/adjective]

I'm not sure if I'm correct, but I think "bit" is used more in informal speech. I think to avoid this kind of confusion? He is a bit cuckoo. (Crazy.) He is a little cuckoo. (Bird.) Or ...
wyc's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
54 views

Natural ways to mean someone is stalling another

Example: If a woman is asked to get married and tries to get time to answer because she feels insecure but doesn't want to say it. I could tell she's stalling the man. But if I wanted to sound more ...
Vanessa Dias's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
513 views

What is the opposite of "a soft spot"?

If one can have a soft spot for cherished things, one can have a ________ for dreaded ones. I've thought about words like "imperviousness" or "immunity", but they sound more formal ...
ROX's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
233 views

Meaning of "having a high game" [closed]

I know that there is an idiom "being at the top of their game". I wanted to know if this sentence makes any sense-Everybody here has a high emoji game. It's referring to people on a certain ...
Crux's user avatar
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