Questions tagged [colloquial-language]

for questions about colloquial language. Colloquial language, colloquial dialect, or informal language is a variety of language commonly employed in conversation or other communication in informal situations.

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Is there a word referring to something that motivates you?

One of my pupils wanted to express that there is a song that gives him motivation to create things. He referred to the song as a "kicker". I looked the word kicker up and the OED says it ...
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33 views

“How are you doing?” Why do we answer “good” instead of “well”?

When someone asks me "How are you doing?" Why do we answer "good" instead of "well" (adv. for doing) ?
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Grab or pick up?

Gaming on consoles is more convenient than computers. You can just pick up/grab your controller and start playing right away. Can you grab/pick up some chips from the grocery store? Do 'grab' and '...
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435 views

Which combination of words sounds natural?

I wonder which construction / combination is the most natural and colloquial (please mention your area when answering the question) and which is outright unnatural and wrong? There is a store /shop ...
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18 views

Non of these/those marriages lasted very long

I get confused every time I come across this/those like in the follwing: "We all know that he's a self-centered, egotistic, and and opinionated bast*rd. And it's not a secret. Even he knows ...
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“To be” is used as the infinitive: “He be like…”, “Work be hard”,

I often see, of course, in colloquial contects, that the word "be" is used like "is" or "are" and so on. E.g.: "I be very happy then", "School be like...&...
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29 views

Are these all idiomatic phrases regarding turning to a certain age and do they mean the same?

I'll be 18 tomorrow. I'm turning 18 tomorrow. I'll turn 18 tomorrow. I will be turning 18 tomorrow. I'm going to turn 18 tomorrow. Are these all idiomatic phrases regarding turning to a certain age ...
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29 views

Why do native speakers sometimes call some one 'name + boy'?

I've heard male native speakers call their male friends by their name + boy. For example, a man's name is David, and a male friend of his once said to him 'Hey David boy...' And I've heard another ...
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14 views

How do I have students open their books at a specific page by speaking

Imagine I am teaching in a classroom and trying to have students open their books at a specific page. Should I say this or something else? dear students, please turn to page 35 and look at figure ...
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41 views

Does “there are” pronounce /ðer/ in spoken American?

An American tutorial teaches reduced speaking, where "there are" sounds like /ðer/, am I hearing correctly? Do Americans speak that way in real life?
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“follow the tutorial” vs. “follow along the tutorial”

From a tutorial Follow along the tutorial to build an automotive user interface and create a #UI like that of your very own embedded device! Ngram Viewer shows writers only use "follow the ...
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37 views

Do native speakers say “you're way too late” in real life?

Google gives About 663,000 results for "you're way too late", some comes from lyrics, some are in a story. Do native speakers say it in real life? Imagine that, it's 8 o'clock AM. My son is still ...
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32 views

“thought I'd/wanted to”

A man walks up to a woman at the bar in a bar and they fall into conversation. He squeezes into the conversation that he's a lawyer. The conversation goes on. At some point in the conversation he ...
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23 views

does the phrase “to get all sad” is used anywhere? If so, can you give me an example?

I am translating a short story from Turkish to English and in one of the places where the emotions are supposed to be really intense I cannot achieve the same meaning, at least I think I don't. In the ...
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260 views

How frequently is the expression “when it comes to” used in spoken English?

If I want to tell my friend about some topics, such as what I do in my free time or my favorite movies, is it appropriate to use "when it comes to" at the beginning of the conversation? For example, "...
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204 views

Colloquial structures meanings

I would like to know how many meanings have the colloquial structure "ain't" aparte from: am not, is not, are not and have not. Example, the song, ain't nobody by Felix Jaehn: Ain't nobody Loves ...
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65 views

“I am cooking”, “I have to cook”, “I am going to cook”, and “I will cook”

I have a situation. I am watching the TV at noon, then I make a telephone call with my husband for a while, then it is time to cook. Which of these is correct? I am cooking (now), bye. I have to cook ...
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Do the British use words like “batso” or “nutso”?

Today I encountered the word "batso" and I understood from context it meant "crazy". It interested me because it sounds like an Italian word "pazzo" which means "...