Questions tagged [colloquial-language]

for questions about colloquial language. Colloquial language, colloquial dialect, or informal language is a variety of language commonly employed in conversation or other communication in informal situations.

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3
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2answers
177 views

Is “firsthand smoker/ first-hand smoker” standard English?

I was wondering if "firsthand smoker" or " first-hand smoker" is a standard formal English or I should use "active smoker". When I looked up "firsthand smoke", "first-hand smoke", "firsthand smoking"...
0
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0answers
205 views

Colloquial structures meanings

I would like to know how many meanings have the colloquial structure "ain't" aparte from: am not, is not, are not and have not. Example, the song, ain't nobody by Felix Jaehn: Ain't nobody Loves ...
2
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1answer
874 views

Someone who lives in a working-class neighborhood

How would an American native speaker refer to someone whose house is located in a bad part of town where some poor people with a lower social / cultural level live and where the dwellers' average ...
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1answer
1k views

Are there better ways to say “I like the sentence someone said” or “I love this sentence someone said”?

If I hear someone(esp. a very famous person) say something (e.g. a sentence) and I appreciate that sentence very much, what can I say? "I like the sentence someone said" or "I love this sentence ...
4
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3answers
339 views

How square is a square

I've recently heard the follwing sentence in a text for children learning English: The blackboard is square. It got translated to the German equivalent of “the blackboard is quadrilateral”. The ...
15
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5answers
11k views

How common is it to use the word 'bitch' for a female dog?

Today I was exposed to the fact that the female form of dog is bitch (just like bull (m) and cow (f)). But I have never heard someone who called his female dog a bitch. So I suspect that in fact it ...
1
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1answer
89 views

'Had a bad thing' and 'We're having a bad thing'?

You had a bad thing that day. You were having a bad thing that day. Could you tell me the difference in meaning between sentence 1 and sentence 2? I feel there must be a difference in meaning.
1
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1answer
61 views

Anne Green Gables: I've seen them worse

Maybe it is standard English, but "I've seen them worse." does not sound like it to me. There is something peculiar about it but I cannot seem to get a fix on why or how it is different. Does it ...
17
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5answers
1k views

Simple present for speaking about the future the way natives do

I searched the whole internet but couldn't find anything else than the standard rules/guidelines as to how to use the simple present for future events. I understand that when something is scheduled, e....
-1
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1answer
17k views

What does “ready to rock n' roll” mean?

The sentence is from Eric Thomas’ Secrets to Success Speech. Guru said, “If you wanna make money, I’ll meet you tomorrow. 4 AM.” So the young man got there 4 AM. He all ready to rock ...
5
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2answers
2k views

Most common adjectives to describe the intensity of drunkenness [closed]

There are several degrees of intensity of drunkenness, ranging from a state of slight euphoria to total oblivion, which may be recognized by the way someone is speaking, moving and behaving. In the ...
4
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1answer
59 views

A phrase understood as a request to step aside to not block out the view/panorama you are looking at

What may be the phrase, playful or polite, that when heard by the one it is addressed to, tells him/her that they are blocking out the sight you are looking at? For example, in Russian, it is a ...
0
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1answer
286 views

Can I use “Me too” like subject?

Can I use "Me too" like subject in an answer? If someone says, I am Italian. I could say "Me too!" in response, but could I say Me too am Italian? If not, why not? It is confusing ...
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2answers
71k views

Is it correct to say “no need of thanks”?

Is it correct to say "no need of thanks" when someone says "thank you"? I think you're welcome, no problem, any time and nothing at all are quite often. And I think no need to say thanks is also ...
2
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1answer
3k views

Is it possible to say “Did you catch the meaning?”

Is it possible to say Did you catch the meaning? Did you catch what I'm trying to say? In order to express/ask if somebody understand something.
4
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1answer
41k views

Is “you was” correct to say?

I've always learnt at school that we have to say: "You were + (add something)" either if the "you" is actually one person or more. But sometimes I heard or read "You was + (add something)" especially ...
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2answers
637 views

What does it mean “ain't no maybe”? [duplicate]

I.e. "There ain't no maybe". The "ain't" can be converted into "is no". So the result is "There is no no maybe". How to understand this?
40
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6answers
206k views

What does “Nailed it” mean?

I came across a few combinations of 'nailed it' or 'nailed down' in various contexts. According to the blog-posts, it seems to be widespread on the internet. However, I have never heard these ...
4
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2answers
760 views

But may be you might of heard tell 'bout the price on her head

Well, she ain't no John Wilkes Booth. But may be you might of heard tell 'bout the price on her head. This is a quote from QT's movie the Hateful Eight. I am aware that this is not supposed to be a ...
4
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4answers
865 views

Improve translation: You are nobody and your name is no one

In Russian culture there is a saying: Ты никто и звать тебя никак Which means that the person is of no importance (in this society) and even his name doesn't mean anything (to this society members)...
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2answers
884 views

Is there any way to tell if a phrase is literal or figurative?

Nowadays, everybody are using pun/metaphor in their sentences, I use Google whether phrase is metaphor or pun. For example: Break a leg is pun, but I think it is really as bones coming out of the leg,...
0
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1answer
70 views

meaning of “Dvd box set” in this sentence

I am watching the show, 'Diners, drive-Ins and Dives' and I wonder one expression. The show host, Guy Fieri said like below in on bakery eating a Cinnamon Pecan Roll. This is like "Cinnamon Rolls ...
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4answers
7k views

How do I ask about “remaining time”?

Let's say the cooking time for a dish is 50 minutes. I want to ask how much time remains between now and when the dish will be done. What is the right way to ask that?
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1answer
3k views

It's not that good “of an idea”

I sometimes hear some people saying, it's not that good "of an idea" or it's not that big "of a deal". Is there a difference between above statements and statements below? It's not a good idea. ...
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1answer
10k views

What are Expressions in English Grammar? [closed]

Moreover what are Idiomatic Expressions and what are Colloquial Expressions?
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1answer
2k views

'which are in stark contrast to' or just 'in stark contrast to'?

Those clerics, who often have views on life which are in stark contrast to the Belgian lifestyle, have been provoking identity crises in many immigrant youths, making them vulnerable for ...
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2answers
4k views

I'd like to have a cup of coffee

Does it sound natural to say I'd like to have a cup of coffee at a café or is it too wordy? It sounds like the more wordy the more polite.
2
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2answers
4k views

“What do we got here?”

Correct or colloquial and grammatically wrong? My dictionary says got got the same meaning as have in american english and I have often used it instead. Would I make people correct me if I were to use ...
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1answer
51 views

Skipping object in colloquial English

Can we skip objects in colloquial English, for example, Have you read the book? Yes, I've read (it) already. By skipping "it", still is it ok? Or Can you drink your milk? But I don't ...
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2answers
19k views

Difference between “Add me” and “Add me up”?

I want people to add me on the social app Snapchat. What should I write in the caption? Should I give my username on Facebook and say "Add me up"? What's the difference between "Add me" and "Add me ...
2
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1answer
1k views

Is that any expression in English for “not too sweet tea”?

Is that any expression in English for not too sweet tea? Here, we normally say it is as sweet as guava, which means the taste of tea is just half sweet, because the amount of sugar is reduced.
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4answers
2k views

What is the English word(s) for “eating salt and sour fruit”

What is the English word(s) for a true experience when someone has been through a learning process during her/his life. In my native language, it's commonly said: She/he has been "eating salt and ...
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1answer
2k views

Because me and my family or because I and my family

What is correct? Because me and my family all lived our whole life in America and we just make visits. or Because I and my family all lived our whole life in America and we just make visits.
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3answers
3k views

Can “version” be used as a verb?

In a software development environment, things have versions, or historic snapshots of how they evolve over time. Can I say "You need to version this or that" so as to refer that something needs ...
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7answers
1k views

Which version is correct and normally used, “between you and me” or “between you and I”?

I was listening to the song Superman by Eminem. I've listened it before many times but from the time I've started learning English grammar I am getting confused while reading or listening English. ...
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1answer
1k views

A cry boy / A crying boy

You are a cry boy now. You are a crying boy now. What does the each sentence mean? When would you choose each form to mean what?
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2answers
2k views

American's 'I've got' and British 'I've got'

So when I think I heard an American said “I got (something)”, actually he/she said “’ve” after the “I” and it’s present perfect? And this is the time where present perfect should be used? And then it'...
1
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1answer
48 views

What does “the up-and-comers” signify?

How to use the phrase "the up-and-comers" properly? Is there any classification of age of people belong to "the up-and-comers"?
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1answer
1k views

“She would of been a good woman”

"She would of been a good woman," The Misfit said, "if it had been somebody there to shoot her every minute of her life." Source: A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery O'Connor ...
8
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5answers
3k views

“Has me and the wife in fits every time.”

Found this in a YouTube video and people were commenting on his, apparently terrible, English skills. What's wrong with the sentence “Has me and the wife in fits every time?”
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1answer
891 views

Is that real vs Really

Is that real. Really. When you hear a unbelievable thing, can I say both of them?
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3answers
3k views

Meaning of “you'd of thought”

I am reading The great Gatsby and there is one part that says: I had a woman up here last week to look at my feet, and when she gave me the bill you'd of thought she had my appendicitis out. I ...
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2answers
10k views

Did I ever! — what does this emphatic statement exactly mean when you say it?

Example: — Did you see how Bill came in to work this morning? — Did I ever! Boy, was he hot under the collar! — What brought that on? — He said that he was extremely angry because he got ...
3
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1answer
889 views

If + simple tense, would + bare infinitive (First conditional with would?)

In a reply to the comment below in this topic: difference between won't and wouldn't If you ask me nicely, I will/would come with you. why here both will and would are correct? The answer was: ...
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2answers
951 views

Are the listed words colloquial to use in writing

Are the listed words colloquial to use while writing? I second this opinion. I reckon, it would benefit both Due to the non stop rain Should we avoid using these in writing? Can someone clarify? ...
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5answers
2k views

“You first” “You second” “You third”

Suppose I'm telling a bunch of people to do something. I'm about to tell a person :"You first", can I say to the others :"You second", "you third" ... ? And is there another way to say that ?
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1answer
26k views

Best answer for “feel free to …” [closed]

When people say "feel free to contact me", I don't know how to answer. How do you reply this?
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2answers
1k views

Usage of “wanna”, “hafta”

In "THE MORPHOLEXICAL NATURE OF ENGLISH to-CONTRACTION", Pullum quotes four examples of usage of "wants to"/"wansta": (5) a. Teddy is the man Mike wants to send. b. Teddy is the man Mike wants ...
9
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2answers
844 views

I heard this very often, “…aren't I”

I hear this sentence very often, for example: "I am right, aren't I!" I wonder if that is the colloquial way or it is a correct English.
8
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7answers
12k views

Can “me” be a subject?

Me and my friend, Tim, are gonna predict the winners of the next dancing with the stars! I found this sentence from a book. I wonder why we don’t use “I and my friend” since I think it must be the ...