Questions tagged [colloquial-language]

for questions about colloquial language. Colloquial language, colloquial dialect, or informal language is a variety of language commonly employed in conversation or other communication in informal situations.

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2
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1answer
921 views

If + simple tense, would + bare infinitive (First conditional with would?)

In a reply to the comment below in this topic: difference between won't and wouldn't If you ask me nicely, I will/would come with you. why here both will and would are correct? The answer was: ...
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2answers
1k views

Are the listed words colloquial to use in writing

Are the listed words colloquial to use while writing? I second this opinion. I reckon, it would benefit both Due to the non stop rain Should we avoid using these in writing? Can someone clarify? ...
14
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5answers
2k views

"You first" "You second" "You third"

Suppose I'm telling a bunch of people to do something. I'm about to tell a person :"You first", can I say to the others :"You second", "you third" ... ? And is there another way to say that ?
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1answer
30k views

Best answer for "feel free to ..." [closed]

When people say "feel free to contact me", I don't know how to answer. How do you reply this?
2
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2answers
1k views

Usage of "wanna", "hafta"

In "THE MORPHOLEXICAL NATURE OF ENGLISH to-CONTRACTION", Pullum quotes four examples of usage of "wants to"/"wansta": (5) a. Teddy is the man Mike wants to send. b. Teddy is the man Mike wants ...
9
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2answers
862 views

I heard this very often, "...aren't I"

I hear this sentence very often, for example: "I am right, aren't I!" I wonder if that is the colloquial way or it is a correct English.
9
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7answers
12k views

Can "me" be a subject?

Me and my friend, Tim, are gonna predict the winners of the next dancing with the stars! I found this sentence from a book. I wonder why we don’t use “I and my friend” since I think it must be the ...
0
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2answers
147 views

Does 'Thanks to offered' sound ok?

Is it ok to say Thanks to offered in this context: Thanks to offered functionality and versatility. . . .
1
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2answers
657 views

“Bloomin'” instead of “blooming”

What is the point of writing -in' instead of -ing ? The character count is the same, so where is the profit?
0
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1answer
3k views

Difference between "outside" and "on the outside"

Is there any difference between the following sentences? I have coffee on the outside. It is referring to some coffee shop. I have coffee outside. Can anyone explain to me which of these ...
1
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1answer
5k views

Should "I don't know / I have no idea" be used carefully? [closed]

Sometimes I have seen native English speakers' uneasiness when they heard "I don't know / I have no idea." They seem to use the phrases carefully, avoiding to say it as much as they can. If they have ...
2
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2answers
3k views

"Toned" and "Endless" Pins

In Dictionary.com listed at number 14 is this definition of pin: Informal a human leg. "Legs that go on forever: Kylie showed off her enviable pins in the dress, which she teamed with black heels" ...
2
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1answer
71 views

Using "lay-by" as verb for buying goods

lay by, 1 : to lay aside : discard, 2 : to store for future use : save, 3 : to cultivate (as corn) for the last time (Merriam Webster) Considering that Merriam Webster's definition of "lay-by" as a ...
7
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2answers
13k views

Do you work or are you a student?

If someone is asked the question below, Q: Do you work or are you a student? A: Neither. I had a job couple of months ago, but I lost it because... does this answer above sound correct?

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