Questions tagged [colloquial-language]

for questions about colloquial language. Colloquial language, colloquial dialect, or informal language is a variety of language commonly employed in conversation or other communication in informal situations.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is that any expression in English for “not too sweet tea”?

Is that any expression in English for not too sweet tea? Here, we normally say it is as sweet as guava, which means the taste of tea is just half sweet, because the amount of sugar is reduced.
2
votes
1answer
30 views

What does “block” mean in “That chemical-engineering block…”?

What is the meaning of the word "block" in the following context? Is it logical that anybody should be expected to be afraid of the work that they feel they were put on this Earth to do. ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

What does “I am no chicken” mean?

Please, have a look at the sentence from the A Study in Scarlet, by Arthur Conan Doyle (Chapter 3 = The Lauriston Garden Mystery). “This case will make a stir, sir,” he remarked. “It beats anything I ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

I'd like to have a cup of coffee

Does it sound natural to say I'd like to have a cup of coffee at a café or is it too wordy? It sounds like the more wordy the more polite.
2
votes
2answers
4k views

“What do we got here?”

Correct or colloquial and grammatically wrong? My dictionary says got got the same meaning as have in american english and I have often used it instead. Would I make people correct me if I were to use ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Because me and my family or because I and my family

What is correct? Because me and my family all lived our whole life in America and we just make visits. or Because I and my family all lived our whole life in America and we just make visits.
2
votes
2answers
152 views

“is gonna finish” vs. “is finishing”

I was being in a class. The professor was lecturing. A friend sent me a WhatsApp message What are you doing? I need your help. I replied Is it Urgent? I'm being in a class which is gonna finish in ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What does “only half kidding” mean in this context?

Almost immediately, she was lost in the labyrinth of works for sale: Takashi Murakami’s lurid blond plastic milkmaids with long legs and erect nipples; the words “any messages?” spelled out in neon ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Is it possible to say “Did you catch the meaning?”

Is it possible to say Did you catch the meaning? Did you catch what I'm trying to say? In order to express/ask if somebody understand something.
2
votes
1answer
63 views

“never mind…” or “forget…”

I have an expression crossing my head but I cannot find any reference on the Internet. I only found "never mind" in the dictionary. I'm talking about "forget". E.g. "I've never visited Paris, ...
2
votes
0answers
105 views

Grammar of “There's lots of flavors out there” [duplicate]

This comes courtesy of one of the episodes of Friends: There's lots of flavors out there. Shouldn't 're be used here in lieu of 's?
1
vote
2answers
622 views

“Bloomin'” instead of “blooming”

What is the point of writing -in' instead of -ing ? The character count is the same, so where is the profit?
1
vote
2answers
446 views

Can't we say “don't/doesn't got” while we can say “I got”, “He got”, “They got” etc.? (American English)

I am used to hearing the positive version of "got" when it is used for meaning "have". For example, I mean we can say "I got a car.", "He got three children.", "I got no money." etc. But I am not ...
1
vote
2answers
668 views

I didn't do nothing or anything

Usually when I want to deny something I will say I didn't do anything However, lately I watched some movies in which the people sometimes said I didn't do nothing They use no instead of any, like ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

What does “the up-and-comers” signify?

How to use the phrase "the up-and-comers" properly? Is there any classification of age of people belong to "the up-and-comers"?
1
vote
2answers
9k views

The difference between Such thing, such a thing, a such thing

Such thing. Such a thing. A such thing. Are all of them grammatically correct? What's the difference between them?
1
vote
1answer
53 views

What does “They do, do they?” convey exactly?

"Oh, don't lie, Harry," she said impatiently. "Ron and Ginny say you've been hiding from everyone since you got back from St Mungo's." "They do, do they?" said Harry, glaring at Ron and Ginny. ...
1
vote
2answers
89 views

Can “it's” be omitted in the following case? [duplicate]

She wriggles herself closer to me. (It's) Definitely not my imagination playing a prank on me. I wonder if you can omit "it's" in situations like these (at least in informal writing). I checked ...
1
vote
2answers
641 views

What does it mean “ain't no maybe”? [duplicate]

I.e. "There ain't no maybe". The "ain't" can be converted into "is no". So the result is "There is no no maybe". How to understand this?
1
vote
2answers
891 views

Is there any way to tell if a phrase is literal or figurative?

Nowadays, everybody are using pun/metaphor in their sentences, I use Google whether phrase is metaphor or pun. For example: Break a leg is pun, but I think it is really as bones coming out of the leg,...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

A cry boy / A crying boy

You are a cry boy now. You are a crying boy now. What does the each sentence mean? When would you choose each form to mean what?
1
vote
2answers
2k views

American's 'I've got' and British 'I've got'

So when I think I heard an American said “I got (something)”, actually he/she said “’ve” after the “I” and it’s present perfect? And this is the time where present perfect should be used? And then it'...
1
vote
2answers
170 views

Is 'haven't a clue' slang? and do people all over the world use it or is it just a British thing, or is it used by a smaller group of people?

Just wondering as I always use it and people often ask me what I'm talking about. So it got me thinking that it might just be a British thing, or maybe even just a thing people from the country ...
1
vote
2answers
51 views

A sh*t that's not bowel movement

My gf sent me a message "My sister is showing me a sh*t." Is that a correct way to write a sentence that doesn't talk about fecal matter? It stood out as weird to me, but I don't know the official ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Differences between Going to and Will in Informal and Formal English

In formal English (or written English), I'm super sure that the Be going to and Will rules are "respected". (Correct me if I'm wrong) For example, probably in formal English, they probably use "Going ...
1
vote
2answers
620 views

What does it “they like me for me” mean?

What does the following mean? They like me for me. I have never seen this expression before.
1
vote
2answers
617 views

This is the thanks I get?

I would like to know whether the expression this is the thanks I get? is used in English or if there is any other expression conveying the same meaning The implication is that one shows no signs of ...
1
vote
2answers
69 views

“Good Night” / “Good Nights”

Is there an expression like "Good Nights" in spoken/written English that differs from "Good Night"? People who speak Spanish language use "Buenas Noches" which literally means "Good Nights". The same ...
1
vote
1answer
171 views

What does it mean by “reach for a banana”?

In this video one of the panel said "he is reaching for a banana" after seeing the robot got down on the desk. I thought this would be an idiom or some phrase that would be found in the urban ...
1
vote
1answer
174 views

An expression meaning doing long and hard mental work resulting in extreme mental fatigue

There's an idiom "work one's fingers to the bone" literally linked to manual labor, and I am looking for the like colloquial, idiomatic or slang expression referring to hard mental work. The one that ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What does “one” mean or stand for in “Hey, I'm on my way, all right? One.”?

In this movie two brothers are talking on the phone: — Yo — Hey, Isaiah. Hey, are you going to pick me up, man? — You all right? What happened? — Man, just some skinheads tripping, man. — All ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

It's not that good “of an idea”

I sometimes hear some people saying, it's not that good "of an idea" or it's not that big "of a deal". Is there a difference between above statements and statements below? It's not a good idea. ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Skipping object in colloquial English

Can we skip objects in colloquial English, for example, Have you read the book? Yes, I've read (it) already. By skipping "it", still is it ok? Or Can you drink your milk? But I don't ...
1
vote
2answers
19k views

Difference between “Add me” and “Add me up”?

I want people to add me on the social app Snapchat. What should I write in the caption? Should I give my username on Facebook and say "Add me up"? What's the difference between "Add me" and "Add me ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Response to “How you doing?”?

What is a natural response to "Good to see you. How you doing?"? Will a natural response include "doing" as in "I'm doing okay" or will "I'm okay" be more ...
1
vote
2answers
742 views

Why do so many people say “equals to” in maths?

I hear a significant number of English-second-language speakers, English-first-language children, and less educated English-first-language peers, say x equals to three times sine alpha For example,...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

What does ”libel schmibel” mean?

Libel schmibel. The dead can't sue. What does “libel schmibel” mean? Another word to say it?
1
vote
1answer
48 views

“Blow” in a conversation

Can "Blow" be used by itself to mean "Blow something up all out of proportion?" As in: She was written off as Blowing it (a situation) in an attempt to implicate him. (Made up example)
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“Make excuses” vs “make up excuses.”

Since "make up" means to fabricate something, I thought saying "make up excuses" would be more common than "make excuses." But Google Books showed me the opposite. made up excuses (4,580) made ...
1
vote
1answer
423 views

Ever vs Never, where to put them and which is better to use

I've a symple question with when to use ever and never. For example in the following two senteces, which it's grammatically better we'll teach them that they won't be able to mess with him, ever ...
1
vote
1answer
15k views

Having/being a sweet tooth

Several times I came across the expression "I am a sweet tooth", not "I have a sweet tooth". Is it allowable in colloquival speech? Example 1 Example 2 Example 3
1
vote
1answer
28k views

Best answer for “feel free to …” [closed]

When people say "feel free to contact me", I don't know how to answer. How do you reply this?
1
vote
1answer
5k views

Should “I don't know / I have no idea” be used carefully? [closed]

Sometimes I have seen native English speakers' uneasiness when they heard "I don't know / I have no idea." They seem to use the phrases carefully, avoiding to say it as much as they can. If they have ...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

Do these sentences have the same meaning: “I don't think he is a student.” and “I think he is not a student.”

1-"I don't think he is student." 2- "I think he is not a student." The speaker has the opinion that "he is not a student". But in order to say this in English, we make up ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

What is the colloquial way to say one will log into one of those famous streaming video services to choose any TV show to watch?

I am not sure whether "put on" is the right one as I am getting anything inside a DVD player or any other device. Nor I do believe the verb play is suitable in this particular case. Here are ...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

Those/this kind of thing

I was asked about whether I'd like to go on a vacation or stay home and relax. While answering it I said: "I prefer staying home and relaxing. I like to have a cup of coffee, take a hot shower. ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

“Bop the fizz” - what's the meaning?

What is the meaning of "bop the fizz" in this sentence? What kind of question is it? "hey who wants to go for lunch?" is a different question from "hey could you bop the fizz for Bigclient?" The ...
1
vote
4answers
157 views

The history of the word “gay” [closed]

When did the word "gay" which initially had a meaning "merry" and "happy" gain another connotation which is now thought to be preliminary? As I understand, the word in the main old meaning was an ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“I want to just say…” vs “I just want to say…”

What's the difference? Are they really different, with a nuance, or is it just a matter of preference? Does one point to your level of fluency more than the other? Made up examples. "I just want to ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Do I need to know something except phrasal verbs and collocations to use colloquial English?

What do I really need to know about colloquial English except phrasal verbs and collocations?