Questions tagged [colloquial-language]

for questions about colloquial language. Colloquial language, colloquial dialect, or informal language is a variety of language commonly employed in conversation or other communication in informal situations.

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1answer
907 views

Is that real vs Really

Is that real. Really. When you hear a unbelievable thing, can I say both of them?
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2answers
31 views

“is you” or “you”

I have seen an interview with Justin Bieber, and there he said, “I just love the fact that what you do so brilliantly is you create such an amazing atmosphere for me,” and so I have a question. Why ...
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1answer
24 views

“Didn't have no” or “didn't have any”?

I have a question about whether "I didn't have no plans" is correct or not, since I think that it's a double negation and therefore not correct, so it should be "I didn't have any plans&...
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1answer
29 views

Growing up/ From a young age

"From a young age we aren't taught to help others. Growing up we are taught to play it safe and avoid risk at all cost." Are the sentences correct? I'm not sure about 'from a young age' and ...
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1answer
43 views

How to ask a restaurant if they provide take out

If I go into a restaurant, and I'd like to know if they provide orders to go/take out? Can I say: "Hi, can I take out?" or "Hi, I'd like to order to go?" Also, I'd like to know ...
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1answer
43 views

What is a less vulgar way of referring to someone's posterior? [duplicate]

What is the least vulgar but still natural (not overly formal) of these: Bum, bottom, backside, behind, rear end... As she walked past him, he stared at her _________.
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1answer
21 views

The feeling you get/the feeling when

The feeling you get when your students get good grades is out of this world. The feeling when your students get good grades is out of this world. I'm confused between 'the feeling you get' and 'the ...
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2answers
34 views

I love (the) rainy season(s)

To mean 'rainy/winter/summer seasons' in general do we say: I love the rainy/winter/summer season, or I love rainy/winter/summer seasons.
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1answer
60 views

Why were some English phrases written in double negatives when the speaker actually wants to express a single negative? [duplicate]

For example, I just saw this phrase on social media: The way 2020 going, I ain't buyin' no PS5. I mean, in this instance, I can ultimately see that what the poster actually mean is that "I ain'...
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1answer
37 views

Can the verb inform be intransitive and used in the sense of making somebody aware of something? And is it colloquial?

She informed she had no idea who had committed that robbery. A friend of mine said this. I'm not sure if it's correct usage of the verb inform because I think it should be followed by an object (...
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1answer
35 views

Eat both soup and meat with potatoes?

What is colloquial? Meat with potatoes or Meat and potatoes. (Meaning cooked potatoes and meat mixed in one dish, perhaps with some savory dressing) UPDATE: It seems you can say "meat and ...
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1answer
23 views

I was toxic MYSELF

I've tried looking up 'myself' but the only results I get is 'myself or by myself.' But my problem is a bit different. I was talking about a few toxic friends who I used to play video games with and I ...
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2answers
702 views

What do you call a person who cares about personal well-being, hygiene and fitness?

In colloquial English, what a person who cares about personal well-being, hygiene and fitness, is called? if there are words which refer to just one or two aspects please mention them too. (Looking ...
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1answer
2k views

“Will see” vs “We'll see”

In Russian, there's a phrase meaning 'We will see in what something will end up'. Literally, that is the form of the Russian verb see put in 2Sg. Is there any colloquial phrase which has the same ...
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1answer
2k views

“I'm not too sure” colloquial?

I've heard people saying "I'm not too sure" on the internet. I guess it means the same as "I'm not very sure". Is such a usage of the word "too" actually colloquial or could you also use it in a ...
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1answer
800 views

what does mean by “getting kicked in the head”?

the context as blow: Since my mom taught there, I would no longer have to ride the bus with a bunch of rowdy boys and worry about stuff like getting kicked in the head. No kidding ----they actually ...
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1answer
83 views

Colloquial English way of asking question

Having gone to market, my friend was asked question that what are the items which has been bought. If I want to ask in colloquial slang.How can i ask?
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1k views

“You gonna” vs “you're gonna.”

Is "you're gonna" or "you gonna" more common in colloquial English? Examples: "You/You're gonna sleep?" "You/You're gonna ruin the mood." You/You're gonna try to convince me to come back....
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1answer
27 views

“I am four or five in”

There is a scene in the movie Drinking Buddies where Gene and Luke are talking in a bar. Gene: I've been ten minutes out since I got here. I had one of these, and then I said, "I'm gonna have one ...
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1answer
9k views

What does “there's no way around” mean? [closed]

Excerpt from Game Of Thrones, season 7, the unexpected, secret meeting of Lannister brothers: Tyrion and Jaime Lannister. Tyrion: Danaerys will win this war, you are (referring to Jaime) a military ...
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3answers
619 views

Should I say “providing me charity,” “providing me with charity,” or “providing charity to me?”

I'm confused because there's exactly 1 hit for each on them on Google Books. ... providing me charity ... providing me with charity ... providing charity to me What's the correct option? Or at ...
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1answer
101 views

Is it common to say “…, you forget?” instead of “…, did you forget?”

Example sentence: It's your fault, (did) you forget? A native English speaker said I should add the "did." But I think "you forget" is okay in casual speech. However, I'm not very sure.
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2answers
44 views

What the rule for these questions without any subject at all?

Expressions and sources: Why pretend? (Depeche mode 'Little 15') Why so serious? (Joker 'Dark knight') Why make sense? (Hot Chip 'Why make sense') Who to be? (Whitey 'Who to be?') Why try? (Limp ...
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2answers
111 views

use of the verb NAG in reference to pain, discomfort

As a native speaker, I know that persistent pain can be described as nagging, as in nagging back pain. However, would it be correct/idiomatic for a doctor, for example, to ask a patient How long has ...
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1answer
29 views

Is “We'll see” an okay sentence to close a conversation?

When I was talking to a native American English speaker, he seemed to use this sentence "we'll see", if I am not mistaken, to signal a closure of our conversation. The conversation was amusing, no ...
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1answer
45 views

Similar phrases to a “situation close to life”?

In Czech, when we talk about a scene in a book/movie that reminds us of our own lives, we say it is very "from life" (ze života). What are the ways to express such feeling in English?
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questions to ask someone's outside appearances

In some situations like you lost your friend in the crowd or you ask about a new friend who you're going to meet later in a party, we would ask a question to know their appearances (i.e. height, ...
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1answer
1k views

Are there better ways to say “I like the sentence someone said” or “I love this sentence someone said”?

If I hear someone(esp. a very famous person) say something (e.g. a sentence) and I appreciate that sentence very much, what can I say? "I like the sentence someone said" or "I love this sentence ...
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1answer
70 views

meaning of “Dvd box set” in this sentence

I am watching the show, 'Diners, drive-Ins and Dives' and I wonder one expression. The show host, Guy Fieri said like below in on bakery eating a Cinnamon Pecan Roll. This is like "Cinnamon Rolls ...
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1answer
10k views

What are Expressions in English Grammar? [closed]

Moreover what are Idiomatic Expressions and what are Colloquial Expressions?
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0answers
34 views

“How are you doing?” Why do we answer “good” instead of “well”?

When someone asks me "How are you doing?" Why do we answer "good" instead of "well" (adv. for doing) ?
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1answer
21 views

meaning of “you wanna know”

In conversation, Hagrid said "first thing you wanna know about hippogriffs is that they are very proud creatures. you do not want to insult a hippogriff." I think nobody said to him like &...
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Grab or pick up?

Gaming on consoles is more convenient than computers. You can just pick up/grab your controller and start playing right away. Can you grab/pick up some chips from the grocery store? Do 'grab' and '...
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0answers
443 views

Which combination of words sounds natural?

I wonder which construction / combination is the most natural and colloquial (please mention your area when answering the question) and which is outright unnatural and wrong? There is a store /shop ...
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0answers
18 views

Non of these/those marriages lasted very long

I get confused every time I come across this/those like in the follwing: "We all know that he's a self-centered, egotistic, and and opinionated bast*rd. And it's not a secret. Even he knows ...
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1answer
91 views

Is this an order or a suggestion?

So, I have been with a friend shopping. After we bought almost everything, I have seen some shoes and I wanted to suggest him nicely then he can get some this shoes. He answered me rudely that he is ...
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0answers
17 views

“To be” is used as the infinitive: “He be like…”, “Work be hard”,

I often see, of course, in colloquial contects, that the word "be" is used like "is" or "are" and so on. E.g.: "I be very happy then", "School be like...&...
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0answers
29 views

Are these all idiomatic phrases regarding turning to a certain age and do they mean the same?

I'll be 18 tomorrow. I'm turning 18 tomorrow. I'll turn 18 tomorrow. I will be turning 18 tomorrow. I'm going to turn 18 tomorrow. Are these all idiomatic phrases regarding turning to a certain age ...
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0answers
30 views

Why do native speakers sometimes call some one 'name + boy'?

I've heard male native speakers call their male friends by their name + boy. For example, a man's name is David, and a male friend of his once said to him 'Hey David boy...' And I've heard another ...
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1answer
14 views

How do I have students open their books at a specific page by speaking

Imagine I am teaching in a classroom and trying to have students open their books at a specific page. Should I say this or something else? dear students, please turn to page 35 and look at figure ...
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0answers
42 views

Does “there are” pronounce /ðer/ in spoken American?

An American tutorial teaches reduced speaking, where "there are" sounds like /ðer/, am I hearing correctly? Do Americans speak that way in real life?
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38 views

Do native speakers say “you're way too late” in real life?

Google gives About 663,000 results for "you're way too late", some comes from lyrics, some are in a story. Do native speakers say it in real life? Imagine that, it's 8 o'clock AM. My son is still ...
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0answers
39 views

“thought I'd/wanted to”

A man walks up to a woman at the bar in a bar and they fall into conversation. He squeezes into the conversation that he's a lawyer. The conversation goes on. At some point in the conversation he ...
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1answer
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does the phrase “to get all sad” is used anywhere? If so, can you give me an example?

I am translating a short story from Turkish to English and in one of the places where the emotions are supposed to be really intense I cannot achieve the same meaning, at least I think I don't. In the ...
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1answer
1k views

“Discover” vs “discovered that.”

I thought that "that" was unnecessary in sentences like: I discovered (that) you can't fake sadness. Google books surprised me though: I discovered you (12,300 hits) I discovered that you (137,...
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1answer
44 views

Is “Last time we were in a house was five weeks” a common colloquialism?

There a scene in the movie Red Dawn: A group of teenagers come to a house and are welcomed in by the owner. One of the teenagers: Last time we were in a house was five weeks. Man: You look it....
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Is the sentence 'Tom said he hadn't got any money' reported speech from 'Tom said, “I haven't got any money”'?

I came across this pair of sentences in 'Cambridge English Preliminary for Schools Trainer' by Sue Elliott and Liz Gallivan CUP 2012: Tom said he hadn't got any money. Tom said, 'I haven't got any ...
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262 views

How frequently is the expression “when it comes to” used in spoken English?

If I want to tell my friend about some topics, such as what I do in my free time or my favorite movies, is it appropriate to use "when it comes to" at the beginning of the conversation? For example, "...
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205 views

Colloquial structures meanings

I would like to know how many meanings have the colloquial structure "ain't" aparte from: am not, is not, are not and have not. Example, the song, ain't nobody by Felix Jaehn: Ain't nobody Loves ...
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2answers
112 views

“I am cooking”, “I have to cook”, “I am going to cook”, and “I will cook”

I have a situation. I am watching the TV at noon, then I make a telephone call with my husband for a while, then it is time to cook. Which of these is correct? I am cooking (now), bye. I have to cook ...