Questions tagged [comparative]

The tag has no usage guidance.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1
vote
1answer
32 views

The definite before comparative degree

Which is the cheaper of the two? is it correct or it should be Which is the cheapest of the two?
-1
votes
1answer
23 views

some confusing problems about “than”

I wish I could write English with more freedom than is at present possible. I am confused about the function of “is” in this sentence. Could you explain the grammar in this sentence?
1
vote
2answers
74 views

Why do they say “more richer”?

See this video (a captioned children's story) at 1:34 (1 minute & 34 seconds) They say, "He becomes even more richer than ever before" Is more richer idiomatic? Why don't they say "even much ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

Which is correct: more expensive than “either ”A or B“ or ”both A and B"?

The prices of A, B, and C are 10, 50, 100 dollars, respectively. In this case, which of the following is correct? C is more expensive than both A and B. C is more expensive than either A or B. ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Comparative of Equality meaning the same as Comparative of Majority

In my mother language (Portuguese) , these sentences: The house looks twice as big as it did in the street. I'll go as quickly as I can They mean, when they are translated, this: The ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Does “quantitative” have a comparative and a superlative?

While academic fields can create their own algorithms for field-specific problems, they are all joined together by the same basic concepts about finding the best and most quantitative ways to ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Talking about an achievement - “one of the harder thing's I've done”

Is it correct, when talking about an achievement, to say something was: "...one of the harder things I've done." I know I should probably say: "...one of the hardest things I've done" But for ...
0
votes
1answer
12 views

Comparative form - which one is correct?

Which of the following comparative forms is correct? It is much cheaper to train doctors, teachers, police and other vital public service workers than it is to train astronauts or the ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

The more buckets are allocated, the less the load factor gets

I was writing an answer on StackOverflow and came up with this sentence The more buckets are allocated, the less the load factor gets. (x ?) It sounds a bit off to me because of "the more buckets"....
0
votes
2answers
24 views

Can “the” be added to “more”?

This calculation method can produce more accurate estimation. Using the more accurate estimation will lead to a more accurate final result. Although I know that there is a special sentence ...
2
votes
2answers
57 views

When do we use more with adjective?

Is it when the comparative form of an adjective is not available? For example; •Conjuring 2 is more horrible than The Nun •Conjuring 2 is creepier than The Nun
1
vote
1answer
52 views

“She is very envious of you…” vs “She is very envious that you…”

I stumbled upon this ELL question where the OP had a sentence She is very envious that you have more money than she does. Out of curiosity, I was wondering if I could rewrite it to any of these ...
1
vote
2answers
95 views

Using “more” in a sentence without “than”. Grammatical?

If you include the word "more" in a sentence without "than" in spoken English, would it be valid? Example: a talk about steps how to resolve environmental issues. I'll get into them in more detail ...
3
votes
2answers
25 views

Long Ellipsis - Comparative

Is this sentence grammatically correct? "The current flowing through the transistor positioned at VCC5 is smaller than at VCC3." The meaning should be: "The current flowing through the transistor ...
1
vote
1answer
526 views

Do “The worstest” exist in english?

I am wondering if the word "the worstest" exists in English? It seems like people sometimes use it.I have never found it in my English grammar book. I am trying to find if it is a common mistake or ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

Adjectives for comparative clauses

So far, I learned that we can use the superlatives and comparatives such as: Bigger/biggest & smaller/smallest Larger/largest & smaller/smallest Higher/highest & lower/lowest and More/...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

“twice the height of” is it a noun or an adjective?

[A] Which is correct? Tower A is twice the height of tower B. Tower A has twice the height of tower B. Is the phrase "the height of" used as a noun (height) or as an adjective (high)? ...
1
vote
1answer
192 views

Confusion of comparative adjective and/or adverb in a sentence

An adjective is that which tells something about a noun or a pronoun. And an adverb is that which describes a verb. However, I find sentences where an adjective is used to describe a verb as follows: ...
1
vote
2answers
73 views

Can I leave out “the” in “caused by the higher oxygen content of ethanol”?

These higher performance outputs for the ethanol are also caused by the higher oxygen content of ethanol fuel. If I put higher instead of the higher, the meaning of the sentences will change?
0
votes
2answers
7k views

“More close” VS “closer”

I want to express that both of us are not quite right but I am closer. Should I put: I'm more close to right than you. I'm closer to right than you. So, which way is correct to express ...
2
votes
1answer
362 views

“More an X” vs. “More of an X”?

Are the following sentences grammatical? a. He is more a poet than a novelist in the traditional sense. b. They are more poets than novelists in the traditional sense. c. He is more of a ...
0
votes
1answer
391 views

I prefer getting up early (rather) than rushing at the last minute

As written in the title: I prefer getting up early rather than rushing at the last minute. Why do I have to include ''rather" when it already makes sense if you omit the 'rather' word. So it goes ...
3
votes
2answers
52 views

When can two pronouns being compared in a sentence be of different types?

I came across a sentence on one of the pages on stackexchange today - He resents your being more popular than he is I always thought that while comparing two pronouns they should always be of the ...
2
votes
2answers
897 views

What is the correct form (using a comparative adjective) of the sentence 'no other planet is so big as Jupiter'?

No other planet is bigger than Jupiter. or Jupiter is bigger than any other planet. Which of these is the 'correct form', using a comparative adjective, of the following sentence? No other ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

“Wronger” and “wrongest” Vs. “more wrong” or “most wrong”

According to what I learnt, there are short and long adjectives. Short adjectives: one syllable. Long adjectives: two / three / four syllables. All of those short adjectives (one syllable) get ...
2
votes
1answer
9k views

Is “more than 2” includes 2?

In technical document in English, I read sentence of "more than 2". I usually just understand it as "two or more" since we generally translate it as similar sentence in Korean. (in Korean, there are ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Can after “the more…the more…” be a noun, not a noun phrase?

Google Translate gives me this sentence: He himself felt helpless in communicating, as the more he said the wrong way. It's not "the more wrong it is", it's just plainly "the wrong way". But since ...
0
votes
2answers
48 views

Comparative after or before the noun

I have normally seen people invert the placement of the adjective and put them after the noun when the adjective is a comparative one: I have good hair - I have hair better than his I would like to ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

When can we use “the” with comparatives?

I have already found in a book this rule: The comparative structure includes the only when the comparative takes a noun position, example: I like the smaller of the two. May you ...
3
votes
2answers
369 views

Is such writing okay in the sentence?

We don't have to worry much, for with as so small an amount as is in his possession he won't go far and we'll eventually catch him. I've made up this sentence and I'd like to know if the "for with as ...
1
vote
1answer
359 views

Comparative or superlative with plural

Let's sat I have a set of 10 different positive numbers. I want to pick the 4 with the smaller (or smallest?) value. Should I say "the four smaller values" or "the four smallest values"? In other ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

comparison: is “faster than I thought” correct? [closed]

In a grammar book I find this question: Find the mistake The car run faster than I thought. Does this sentence have a grammar mistake? I guess not. Edit: I thought "run" is in the simple past ...
0
votes
0answers
433 views

Can strong adjectives have comparative and superlative?

I learnt that strong adjectives are "ungradable" so for example the adjective enormous can't be used with intensifiers such as very, slightly, a little, a bit, extremely, terribly, etc. So I wonder if ...
1
vote
1answer
161 views

Question about comparative adjective

The question is about filling the blank with the best answer. (with the word given in the parentheses) 1. An eagle flies ........... a sparrow (high) a. Higher Than b. More Highly than ...
3
votes
2answers
194 views

Is it grammatical to use a comparative form with a definite article?

A: Whose book is this? Yours? B: Oh, it's Mark's. Mine is -----. I know * Mine is thinner.* is correct. How about Mine is the thinner. Is it grammatical to add the article? Thanks a lot.
1
vote
1answer
43 views

your better life

Can one say: When he sees your better life, he will be jealous. Instead of: When he sees your life, which is better than his, he will be jealous. Can one say: When he sees your better house,...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Which is right between these two sentences? “much easier” vs. “more easily”

The children learn a new language much easier than adults. The children learn a new language more easily than adults. I think 2 is right because easy modifies the verb, so it needs to be written ...
3
votes
2answers
791 views

Positive, comparative, superlative and… is there a fourth?

I'm wondering whether English has something beyond its superlative degree. In my language we call that "túlzófok", it literally translates to "exaggerative degree." I'm wondering because I often hear ...
5
votes
2answers
66 views

Prettier a flower

Is This one is prettier a flower than a rose. acceptable? Or am I not allowed to invert it and have to say This one is a prettier flower than a rose. ?
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Is using “madder” grammatically correct?

I've seen in several occasions many people using the comparative adjective "madder". Like in saying "I'm mad at him. But if he didn't ask I'll be even madder." This "madder" just doesn't sound ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

This book is comparatively cheap/cheaper than that one

I am confused at the usage of (comparatively+than). Please guide.
1
vote
1answer
744 views

word that describes advantages being “surpassed” or “exceeded” by disadvantages

For instance, a sports car might have all the technology and power but the high cost is its disadvantage compared to an average car. So "However, the advantage of high technology and power is _____ed ...
0
votes
2answers
70 views

Are there other ways to say “The store is farther from the motel than we expected.”?

The store is farther from the motel than we expected. As the comparative form "farther" is a bit distant from "than" in the above sentence, it doesn't sound intuitive in relation with "than we ...
0
votes
2answers
885 views

Usage of “compared to” [closed]

Which can I say? The price of A is higher compared to B. or The price of A is higher compared to the price of B.
0
votes
1answer
306 views

Can I say “Put 3 times the amount of water than soybeans”?

Can I say: Put 3 times the amount of water than soybeans. Or: Put 3 times water than soybeans. Put 3 times cups of water than soybeans. Put 3 times the amount of water as soybeans. Put 3 times as ...
4
votes
5answers
5k views

Twice as short, twice as cheap, twice as slow?

Is it grammatically correct to say: This book is twice as expensive as that one. That book is twice as cheap as this one. This rope is twice as long as that one. That rope is twice as ...
5
votes
1answer
205 views

Do monosyllabic past participles used as adjectives follow the comparative and superlative rules about adding -er/-est suffixes?

This question showed up in my Writing part of F.C.E. test when I wrote TV is the most bought electric household appliance In that moment, I wondered whether boughtest is the correct form instead ...
3
votes
1answer
36k views

“much more” or “far more”?

1: What is difference between "much more" or "far more"? 2: Is the incorrect sentence, below I mentioned, really wrong? 3: If so, how should I use "much more" or "far more"? Incorrect: Since her ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

Help understanding the differences between more than/about and most/all of

I am very confused when doing homework because there are four sentences which are really alike but my teacher said that they are different and I still don't understand why. "More than three-...
1
vote
1answer
17k views

How to use “more” as adjective and adverb

Where should I use more as adjective (comparative) and adverb? Sometimes, it seems like Mary does things only to make it more inconvenient for her husband to have a good time when he’s out with his ...