Questions tagged [comparative-constructions]

For questions about expressing comparisons between two or more entities or groups. The comparison could be about degree, quantity, or quality. For example, "You're tall as your father." or "This one is better than that one."

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10
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3answers
4k views

Can fat change into muscle, or not? What does “Fat cannot change into muscle any more than muscle can change into fat.” mean?

I have a problem with the interpretation of this sentence. Fat cannot change into muscle any more than muscle can change into fat. I guess that it would mean either 1 or 2 below. The change from ...
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0answers
20 views

Is it grammatically correct to say “the more likely it would be to have a high intelligence”?

In double comparatives, is it grammatically correct to say The better capacity of logical thinking, the more likely it would be to have a high intelligence.
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0answers
29 views

Should I omit “what” or not?

This issue is bigger than what I anticipated. This issue is bigger than I anticipated. Any changes in meaning with the inclusion of "what"?
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0answers
18 views

What does “which is only half as hard to remember” mean in this context?

This is a paragraph in a children's book called Murderous Math, this paragraph introduce the Squares, in the chapter which help children to learn the times table. the paragraph says: "Squares are ...
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1answer
17 views

The usage of “to be” in double comparatives?

I read when "be" is used in double comparative, it is sometimes omitted in the book of "Top Notch", like: The better the quality of health care (is), the higher the life ...
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2answers
25 views

Does it make sense to say something is as _ as something else is _ if the 2 adjectives are opposites?

Does it make sense or not to use this form… A is as X as B is Y …if X and Y are antonyms? For example "He is as tall as she is short" to say that he is very tall?
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1answer
13 views

all the other boxes vs the other boxes

For example, we have some boxes (A, B, C, D) in the room... If the second sentence is grammatically correct, what is the difference? Box A is bigger than all the other boxes. Box A is bigger ...
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0answers
19 views

“More” vs “More than that”

Is the first example correct and natural? Is it strictly necessary to state "more than that" in this context? How much did your shoes cost? ₤60? – No, more. How much did your shoes cost? ₤60? –...
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1answer
81 views

What is the comparative and superlative form of “super”?

I need a little help about how to form comparative and superlative degree for the word "super". I found on a website as super is used for comparative and superlative degree as well. And I also learnt ...
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1answer
25 views

“than compared to” or “than that of” in comparative?

I got stuck by the following sentence, which can be found here: If we generate the column proportions, we can see that a higher fraction of plain text emails are spam(209/1195 = 17.5%) than ...
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1answer
20 views

Comparative degree usage

She is beautiful than mary. She is more beautiful than mary. Are both sentences correct and have same meaning? If not, what is the difference in their meaning?
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1answer
44 views

Can I say “less bigger” or “more weaker” and similar phrases?

Suppose that A is bigger than B B is bigger than C Now, is it fine if I say, Compared to A, B is less bigger than C? If so, in this context, can I remove the first part in the almost formal ...
0
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1answer
17 views

Clause after “Than” in comparatives?

Can I use a clause after Than? You are better than when you were yesterday. People have more chances of dying when they don't fasten their seatbelts than when they do. You're faster than ...
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1answer
58 views

Which is the principal clause here? [closed]

We know the expression, "The more . . . the more" expresses that the two things vary together. A comma separates the two clauses : "The more you have, the more you want". Each part is ...
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0answers
20 views

Should I add “are” after Women in this sentence? Or adding “are” is redundant?

Original sentence: Well-Off White men are 3 times more likely than women to get job Interviews Edited one: Well-Off White men are 3 times more likely than women are to get job Interviews Adding "...
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3answers
53 views

The ambiguous meaning of “He is better.”

In A Comprehensive Grammar of The English Language, 7.77 comparison of good, well and ill, it says: He is better. is ambiguous between: (a) He is well again. (b) He is less ill. I can only ...
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1answer
33 views

Is object X *like* object Y if X=Y?

Imagine we have two names, X and Y, which describe the same object. If X and Y are identical in every possible way, and therefore X=Y, is X is like Y. a true statement?
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1answer
34 views

As far away from London as my city is from it

While talking about distance between cities I couldn’t understand how to use “as far away as” . This is why I needed to write to sentence to be corrected if I am wrong Your city is as far away from ...
0
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1answer
27 views

Why do we use much prettier but not much interesting?

Here is the passage from the text I've just read: I think this material is much prettier than that, don't you? Well, the design is more interesting and the colors are brighter. I wonder, can ...
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0answers
21 views

Usage of Comparative : as … as

Consider the following sentence : Tom is as tall as Mary. This sentence uses comparative, as ... as. Here, Tom and Mary are evenly matched. In the following sentence, we used as ... as. But I want to ...
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1answer
106 views

In the same way or In the same way as

Which sentences are correct? a) He looks at you in the same way Rick does. b) He looks at you in the same way as Rick does. c) He looks at you as Rick does. Is there any difference between “...
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0answers
28 views

comparative clauses

Is this structure called comparative clauses? Is this correct? You can learn more about a country when you visit it than you can learn when watching a documentary about it.
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2answers
118 views

Which of the following is correct? “as I/me/mine”

She has the same religious beliefs as I. (I do) She has the same religious beliefs as me. (sounds wrong) She has the same religious beliefs as mine. (just how you say "she has the same car ...
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1answer
43 views

“In two times less” as a means of comparision

How should I compare the population of the countries, in this case Russia and the UK? Like this? Britain is much smaller in sizes than Russia, however, its population is only in two times less. ...
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0answers
19 views

Whether or not to drop the subject after “than”

I wrote this sentence: The result of the treatment will be less effective than (that) would be achieved by aspirin being added. I have noticed that, in many sentences, the subject after than are ...
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1answer
64 views

Is “worse” correct in “His Chinese is no worse than mine”?

Given the following sentence, am I correct to input the word "worse" to fill in the blank and make the sentence understandable? I cannot speak Chinese very well, and he cannot either. His ...
0
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1answer
101 views

Comparing two qualities of the same thing

When we say, for example, "James is taller than Eric", we are comparing the same quality in two people. But are we allowed to use this structure to compare two qualities of the same thing? For example,...
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0answers
20 views

The correct comparative to use in this sentence

Comparative adjectives are adjectives that we used when comparing two nouns, pronouns or objects. We add either 'er' or more to the positive form to give us comparative. e.g Nice-nicer, handsome-more ...
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2answers
74 views

Less than versus fewer than

I completed my Doctoral Degree in less than four years. I completed my Doctoral Degree in fewer than four years. Are both the sentences correct and mean the same thing or one ...
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1answer
75 views

“(a) little less” in a sentence

John is eating a little less than usual. John is eating little less salt than usual. Are the expressions a little less and little less grammatical? Also, are there more cases in which different ...
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2answers
67 views

Regarding comparative form: the structure after 'than'

I found the following exercise in "Grammar Practice" (written by Penny Ur, p.122, 2016): Write sentences that express your own opinion, using the comparative form of the adjectives given. 1. ...
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2answers
80 views

On the meaning of this quote from Mr. Russell

Does Mr. Bertrand Russell's quote The true spirit of delight, the exaltation, the sense of being more than Man, which is the touchstone of the highest excellence, is to be found in mathematics as ...
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2answers
29 views

How to use competitive for a group of people?

I want to say that 2-3 people are the most competitive, they are part for the same group. In theory "the most" is for a single. I do not know how to say for a group of people or characteristics. Is ...
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1answer
163 views

Easier accessible?

Is it correct to say “It is easier accessible”? I think the correct way is to say “It is accessible more easily” or “It is easier to access something”. I think that we cannot describe an ...
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2answers
1k views

“(the) most greatest” or “(the) greatest”

I'm a beginner so soory for my English. I don't know and couldn't find which one is right on the internet. Is"(the) most greatest" used by people? Or like, is it right to use that? I saw this in a ...
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3answers
92 views

More expensive than others

Let's imagine I have some boats with different prices. I am going to be selling them soon. I have gotten a person to buy one of them and he approached the boat I am selling for the highest price. Can ...
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1answer
23 views

The word 'like' before a verb and after a noun

I'm reading a book by Salman Rushdie (Shame) and came to such a sentence, where I'm not sure to which word the phrase with like refers. ...while that wind like the cough of a sick giant burned away ...
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1answer
44 views

The comparative construction of “bluff”

the comparative degree of bluff (having a open way of talking) is more bluff, Why? As a monosyllable, maybe it should be bluffer?
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1answer
181 views

Bluer or more blue in “its more blue offerings can get steamier”?

As I know, a monosyllabic adjective is usually made comparative with -er, while polysyllabic adjective is usually made comparative with word more. The problem is that I found an article that uses word ...
0
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1answer
21 views

Saying fraction with a noun

Consider a sentence like We consider a cluster only if the size of the cluster is at least 1/k of the size of its parent. How can we reword the sentence with a fraction + noun. Maybe something ...
0
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1answer
32 views

Comparison: which one is correct

Which of the following sentences is correct or more idiomatic for comparison between two things: The AUC (the area under curve) for the model A is greater than of the model B The AUC (the area under ...
3
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1answer
4k views

“… more suited.” vs “…more suitable.”

A student presented me this quiz question I am no longer satisfied with my job, and I would really like to find something more ______   A) attracting    C) suited  ...
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2answers
34 views

Compare and emphasise on the incident happened `Before`

Suppose person-1 has achieved a milestone today and person-2 achieved two years ago. Now how can I emphasise on this time difference? Since Before is not an Adjective it doesn't have Comparative or ...
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1answer
42 views

Are “other than” and “different than” the same?

Rainbows can be other than they seem, and seem other than they are. From "Understanding Music: Philosophy and Interpretation" by Roger Scruton. I am not sure if it's the case, but "other than" seem ...
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2answers
317 views

“As cool as ice” vs “cool as ice”

The examples: Meet Val Kilmer, who's cold as ice. Meet Val Kilmer, who's as cold as ice. Is the use of "as" in the first sentence grammatical? Why or why not? Does it retain the same ...
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1answer
60 views

Why can't I say 'I am much happy now'?

As far as I know, to use "much" with an adjective, the adjective has to be in comparative form. For example, much happier, much prettier, etc. And it is used with nouns; I don't have much time. I ...
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2answers
430 views

Does the phrase “more obvious” mean “just barely noticeable among many” in certain contexts?

Let me add some context here: In Frank Herbert’s Dune, there is this sentence: “I know the Dark Things and the ways of the Great Mother,” Jessica said. She read the more obvious signs in Mapes’ ...
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1answer
22 views

as little (+adjective) as

For example, one would normally say: I use make-up to look as beautiful as possible. But what if, perhaps to sound a little humorous, I said: I use make-up to look as little ugly as possible. ...
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1answer
61 views

“She is very envious of you…” vs “She is very envious that you…”

I stumbled upon this ELL question where the OP had a sentence She is very envious that you have more money than she does. Out of curiosity, I was wondering if I could rewrite it to any of these ...
6
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3answers
280 views

You're taller than (it) is described (Is the omission of 'it' obligatory?)

In an earlier question "You're taller than (is/are) described", there came up this issue of whether 'it' could be inserted as follows: a. You're taller than it is described. The grammar book that ...

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