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For questions about expressing comparisons between two or more entities or groups. The comparison could be about degree, quantity, or quality. For example, "You're tall as your father." or "This one is better than that one."

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comparison - less variable than beef?

Typically, we compare two entities of the same sort, so that we say "John's hat is bigger than Peter's," not "John's hat is bigger than Peter" unless, of course, we are deliberately comparing a person'...
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1answer
52 views

Confusing about phrase which I should use after “than”

Young people's expenditure in Canada is more evenly split than in Poland. or Young people's expenditure in Canada is more evenly split than that in Poland. I always have the challenge with this ...
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1answer
52 views

As…as structure

I have a sentence like this: He hasn't travelled to as many places as me. He has travelled to as fewer places as me. Are these sentence correct? and Do they have the same meaning?
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1answer
13 views

The more … the more statement

I want to write the following sentence using the more ... the fewer statement. There are 50 soldiers and 5 missions to be carried out. If N soldiers are assigned to the missions, then 50-N ...
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4answers
63 views

more compared with someone?

The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary defines come off worse as the following: to lose a fight, competition, etc. or suffer more compared with others I am wondering whether "compared with" can ...
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0answers
16 views

'than + clause' vs ' than + that + clause'

I find those sentences here: She'd rather choose her than (that she'll choose) me. I like her more than (I like) him. I'm more likely to give him a reward, than (that I'll give it to) her. ...
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0answers
38 views

“within” or “during” which is appropriate for a comparative sentence?

Consider: The revolving door rotates 360 degrees. When the revolving door is in rotational position A corresponding to a rotation angle of 30 degrees, the force required to start turning it is five ...
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1answer
130 views

difference between twice as … as and twice more than [duplicate]

Do both of the following sentences have the same meaning? 1- My salary is twice higher than yours. 2- My salary is twice as high as yours.
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1answer
45 views

I prefer getting up early (rather) than rushing at the last minute

As written in the title: I prefer getting up early rather than rushing at the last minute. Why do I have to include ''rather" when it already makes sense if you omit the 'rather' word. So it goes ...
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2answers
33 views

Which of the following sentences is correct? And what is the striking contrast among them?

Which of the following sentences is correct? And what is the striking contrast among them? 1) The richer you are , the happier you can be. 2) The richer you are, the happier you will be. ...
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1answer
38 views

X is more similar to Y compared to Z

Consider this sentence: X is more similar to Y compared to Z Which of these does this sentence mean? X is more similar to Y and less similar to Z The similarity of X to Y is more than the ...
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0answers
43 views

use of adverb: as tight as or tight as much as

We write: Then tie this part as tight as you want. And we also write: Then tie this part tight as much as you want. Is the first one more natural than the second one?
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2answers
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is “Cleaner the room is Healthier it will be” grammatically correct?

Is this correct if I write "Cleaner the room is Healthier it will be". Is it saying If my room is cleaner today, it will improve my health in future (as there is 'Healthier it will be'). If so, ...
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1answer
36 views

“It's so X as Y” Vs. “It's as X as Y”

I learnt that the structure of comparative sentence is between two "as". For example: It is as big as an elephant. He is as clever as Einstein. She is as nice as her brother. Now my ...
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1answer
35 views

Phrase question [closed]

I will hit on your face I will hit in your face which one is correct I will slap on your face I will slap in your face which one is correct I will say on your face I will say to your face which one ...
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2answers
53 views

Verb question query

As a 13-year-old in a boarding school, I would sit in my dorm room with my friends flipping through old-battered copies of Vogue, talking about how one day we would all be featured in the magazine. ...
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1answer
35 views

“It more makes sense that he's there” Vs. “It makes sense more, that he's there”

What's the correct choice among the following choices? I have a doubt about where to place the adjective "more" in this verbal sentence (unlike in nominative sentences that I know that I have to put ...
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1answer
46 views

How to use “outperforms” in a comparative structure?

In your hand every day is a device that a thousand times outperforms the computer that drove Apollo 11 landing on the Moon, yet hardly one acknowledges it, let alone fully appreciate it. So far I've ...
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0answers
56 views

Why do we need the first “as” in comparative structures like “The apple is *as* big as a watermelon.”

Why do we need the first "as" in the sentence "The apple is -as- big as a watermelon."? What's wrong in saying "The apple is big as a watermelon" in the same meaning of "The apple is as big as ...
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1answer
94 views

“Sooner forgotten” Why is it not “soon forgotten”?

I came across a line when reading Alice Munro's stories: Another possible reason for his growling dislike has just occurred to me, and it’s odd that I didn’t think of it before. We were both flawed,...
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1answer
45 views

“The better of the chances”: Why not “better chances”?

I ran into a sentence on a sports site: The home side dominated possession in the first half and created the better of the chances, with Inter reduced to taking potshots from distance in order to ...
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1answer
19 views

a better company than…vs a company better than

You can build a better company than he ever did. You can build a company better than he ever did. I know # 1 works, but does #2 work as well? If #2 works, does it mean the same thing as #1? ...
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1answer
41 views

Parallelism in comparison

Is it correct to say: He is more interested in video games than his girlfriend. Or should it be: He is more interested in video games than his girlfriend is. If we omit the is, is the first ...
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1answer
23 views

How to write a comparison result correctly in simple sentence

I have two methods. The first method needs 30 steps to be done. The second method needs only 10-15 steps. I would like to compare the steps that each method needed to be done. Here is my sentence: ...
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2answers
99 views

Syntax of the Comparative Clause Construction in English

I'm reading Syntax of the Comparative Clause Construction in English by Joan W. Bresnan. The author says: The comparative clause construction in English is almost notorious for its syntactic ...
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0answers
47 views

You're stronger than I am vs You're stronger than me [duplicate]

Those things are correct gramatically? What's the difference? My girlfriend and I went to the beach and I threw her in the water and she said "You're stronger than I am." I think that "You're ...
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1answer
24 views

than is thought by

New research involving tiger salamanders indicates that the traditional theory of natural selection is more strongly supported by the evidence than is thought by those who consider only the case ...
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3answers
2k views

less happy or less happier?

I think it is grammatically correct to say She is not happier than her sister but, with the adverb less, I should say She is not less happy than her sister. 1) She is not less happy than her ...
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2answers
342 views

Is such writing okay in the sentence?

We don't have to worry much, for with as so small an amount as is in his possession he won't go far and we'll eventually catch him. I've made up this sentence and I'd like to know if the "for with as ...
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1answer
50 views

Which is more formal: clearer or more clear?

I know both forms are correct, but I wonder which is more formal. Is there any difference in levels of formality?
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1answer
35 views

Can the “as..as” comparison work in the following way?

I'm pretty much aware of how to use the "as..as" comparison in sentences like: The apple is as red as a tomato. The car is as old as my grandfather. etc. But I was wondering if in complex sentences ...
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1answer
23 views

Analyze structure: Her playing was Romantic, but it was at least as close in spirit

Her playing was Romantic, but it was at least as close in spirit to the style of playing intended by composers of the Baroque and Classical eras, as have been the more exacting but less ...
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2answers
29 views

Comparative construction with two adjectives

I need a little piece of advise. I am not sure about the right grammatical structure in a comparative sentence with two adjectives, the former with three or more syllables and the latter with only ...
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2answers
2k views

“prefer to” Vs “prefer + rather than”

1 I prefer English lessons rather than Spanish one. 2 I prefer English lessons to Spanish one. 3 I prefer coffee to chocolate. 4 I prefer coffee rather than chocolate. 5 I would prefer to make a ...
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1answer
65 views

She danced better than any of us (did?)

I read this sentence : The three individuals are so different that their tastes vary from one another's. In this their tastes are compared so apostrophe is used with another But in this sentence ...
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1answer
19 views

Can I use comparative adjective for compound adjectives

Can I use comparative adjective for compound adjectives? For example, Caged birds are longer-lived birds than the ones in the wild.
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1answer
632 views

“excited as much as” or “as excited as”

Which one is correct? No one made me feel excited as much as you did No one made me feel as excited as you did
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0answers
22 views

Is more of a computer task correct?

Let's say my professor gives me a question in math requiring complicated programming. Then I want to tell her that it is 80% computer work. Is it correct to say that it is more of a computer task? ...
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1answer
28 views

What is the difference between the sentences?

I'm wondering the difference in meaning between these sentences. Or do they have the same meaning? Please explain to me. Jurong Bird Park is larger than any other bird park in Southeast Asia. ...
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1answer
43 views

“found him brighter than during our meeting” – unmatched comparison with 'than'

Contrary to earlier reports I found him brighter than during our meeting. I read this sentence in a Google Books library of a author Thorpe Edgar, don't know if he is a native speaker or not. Also I ...
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1answer
39 views

unbalanced structure for comparison sentence

It is not as cold in January as in December. What kind of comparison it is? Is it an unbalanced structure or not?
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1answer
155 views

The meaning of “ He took most of those long drives with his daughter — all through the Southeast and as far away as Dallas.”

So, a person lives in North Carolina and he usually takes his daughter across the states with his car. And the following sentence, He took most of those long drives with his daughter — all through ...
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0answers
51 views

“Passage linking that with this” vs “passage that links to this”

From our comprehension exercise book: In the breeding season the water-spider picks out the house of a likely-looking female and builds himself a cottage next door, and then presumably being of a ...
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3answers
28 views

strong enough to cause damage vs so strong that

The earthquake is strong enough to cause damage only near its epicentre. If I change this sentence into so adjective that, The earthquake is so strong that it can cause damage only near its ...
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3answers
1k views

A question about age comparison

John has two daughters, S and X. S = 18 years old X = 9 years old Now, if I want to compare their ages, how do you say it naturally? I have written these three sentences, do they sound good ...
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1answer
90 views

Is “than was wise” grammatically correct?

That third night he found his way more quickly than before. He was walking so fast he knew he was making more noise than was wise, but he didn't meet anyone. —J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the ...
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2answers
523 views

How do you say two or several things are about equivalent to each other in English?

How do you say two or several things are about equivalent to each other in English? For example, if I post a question here and receive two answers which seem equally good to me, and I don't know ...
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0answers
34 views

“It took {bla bla} to do something” structures: what's wrong with the dummy subject in comparative sentences?

Based on this answer, I would like to know why it's really odd to say: Fixing the problem took me two hours more than it took me to find the problem. I know we can (or should) use ellipses, I ...
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1answer
629 views

“A little too (much) young” vs “A little bit too (much) young” vs “a bit too (much) young”

I often see phrases like "a little too much", "a little bit too small", "a bit too big", "a little bit too much old", "a little too heavy", and "a bit too old" and as far as I know it means "to some ...
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3answers
1k views

Seemingly unnecessary verbs in comparisons

I've come across a strange habit in comparisons that seems to be pretty popular. Instead of saying (what I think to be correct): He runs faster than Robert. Sometimes I hear or read: He runs ...