Questions tagged [comparative-constructions]

For questions about expressing comparisons between two or more entities or groups. The comparison could be about degree, quantity, or quality. For example, "You're tall as your father." or "This one is better than that one."

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Can there be no 'a' between such and a noun?

When it comes to losing weight, a quick fix to would be nice, but we know there’s no such [a] thing. (Aussie 7 News) It sounds like there isn’t ‘a’ in the news. So I wonder if it be right when ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

Comparative vs. Superlative While Comparing Two Items

In his book section 176, 3rd ed., Swan says: Elder brother/sister are used when a person has only one brother/sister who is older; eldest is used when there are more. An elder son/daughter is ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Where is the subject in “[…] weaker than would otherwise have been the case”?

Where is the subject in the following dependent clause? [...] Germany adopted a much weaker currency than would otherwise have been the case [...] (taken from BBC News) Is "the case" the subject? ...
1
vote
2answers
20k views

The usage of 'so…as…'

First of all, this is not a duplicate... E.g., have a look at these posts: https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/137678/comparisons-so-adjective-adverb-as-or-as-adjective-adverb-as "as ......
1
vote
3answers
40k views

Is “more better” ungrammatical?

I want to find out whether these sentences are grammatically incorrect: It is more better than your book or It is far more better than your book
5
votes
2answers
5k views

“a so enjoyable party” or “so enjoyable a party”

I did some exercises on http://www.examenglish.com/ and did surprisingly pretty well. At a certain stage, the sentence mentioned in the title came by. Since I would of course say "an enjoyable ...
4
votes
6answers
2k views

“No more than” — comparing two clauses

I came across this sentence today: Even she, who believed herself to be a revolutionary, could no more have broken her marital bangles than she could have driven a stake through her husband's heart....
18
votes
3answers
73k views

Is it “less than” or “lesser than”?

I often hear people say "less than", but shouldn't it be "lesser than"? Which one is correct?
10
votes
7answers
2k views

''You're tall as your father" is this sentence absurd?

You're as tall as your father. I don't have as much money as you have. If I omit the first 'as' is the sentence absurd or grammatically incorrect? You're tall as your father. I don't have ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

How do you say two or several things are about equivalent to each other in English?

How do you say two or several things are about equivalent to each other in English? For example, if I post a question here and receive two answers which seem equally good to me, and I don't know ...
2
votes
3answers
14k views

“three times as much as” vs. “three times more”

1. She earns three times as much as I. 2. She earns three times more than I. Are these two sentences grammatically correct?
2
votes
1answer
75 views

You're taller than (is/are) described

You're taller than described. I think 'be' is omitted between 'than' and 'described', right? If so, what's the correct form of 'be'? a. You're taller than are described. b. You're taller ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

Understanding the negative comparison “I didn't want to see her any more than she wanted to see me”

While I was studying I saw a sentence but I can't understand it. Here is the sentence; As, I didn't want to see her any more than she wanted to see me I didn't mind when she told me so. I don't ...
1
vote
1answer
901 views

Is “it is more difficult and nobler an enterprise” ungrammatical?

Is "it is more difficult and nobler an enterprise" ungrammatical? The question came from the following thread on this site. I had a girlfriend, whom I didn't want to leave A user TRomano told ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

Verb question query

As a 13-year-old in a boarding school, I would sit in my dorm room with my friends flipping through old-battered copies of Vogue, talking about how one day we would all be featured in the magazine. ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

lower grades than her / lower grades than she did / lower grades than she got

When she was in college, she used to think she was better than those who got lower grades than her / got lower grades than she did / got lower grades than she got. Are the three above phrases in ...
0
votes
2answers
264 views

Is this word “precariously” add meaning to the first of the sentence or else?

The tall, forbidding palace perched atop the very edge of the mountainous cliff, overlooking so precariously the vast, black body of water below that it appeared almost ready to plummet into the ...
0
votes
2answers
23k views

“prefer to” Vs “prefer + rather than”

1 I prefer English lessons rather than Spanish one. 2 I prefer English lessons to Spanish one. 3 I prefer coffee to chocolate. 4 I prefer coffee rather than chocolate. 5 I would prefer to make a ...