Questions tagged [comparative-degree]

For questions about the comparative form of an adjective or adverb. For example, "faster" is the comparative of the adjective "fast" and "more confidently" is the comparative form of the adverb "confidently".

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-4 votes
2 answers
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Shadowier or Shadowyer?

folks, I'm now trying to refute what dictionaries say, so I have to be either supported or disproven by you, wise owls. Okay, now I'm asking you to participate in my own presumption: dictionaries say ...
-2 votes
1 answer
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Positive and comparative degree of same adjective [closed]

A little less virtue and I might have lived longer. Reference: THE ANGEL AND THE AUTHOR -AND OTHERS by Jerome K. Jerome As less is a comparative degree of little, it's here being used right after its ...
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Is it less funds or fewer funds?

As far as I know, countable nouns are used with 'few' and 'fewer,' whereas uncountable ones go with 'little' and 'less.' However, I encountered these examples: Reduced saving means less funds for ...
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1 answer
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A question about a comparative construction

I have known that an adjective of a positive degree is always omitted in a subordinate clause of a comparative sentence like the following *He is taller than I am (tall) I happened upon a phrase ...
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1 answer
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'some respect for myself': What does it mean?

I have recently heard of the sentence 'I have some respect for myself'. What is the difference between this sentence and another one 'I respect myself'? Is it a matter of degree of respect? Thanks for ...
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2 answers
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"Pure" VS "Purer" VS "More pure" [closed]

Q.1) What's the difference between pure, purer, and more pure, and what's the correct situation to use each one? Q.2) What should I write (pure, purer, or more pure) in the following blank? Juice ...
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0 answers
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'Worse' vs 'less good'

Page 263 of Garner's fourth reads Depend typically takes on (or, less good, upon). When a clausal complement follows the verb, to omit the on is a casualism— What differences does using worse ...
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1 answer
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What should be appropriate adjective here (worst to worse)?

His condition got from worst to worse. Now to correct sentence i'll use worse to worst but for implying that his condition got better should i use well??
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1 answer
258 views

The decoration of the new office block is more/most pleasing

This sentence is from Edgar Thorpe's Objective English. As I know, we should use the comparative adjective to compare between two entities and superlative adjective to compare among three or more. But ...
0 votes
1 answer
112 views

Use of positive and comparative degrees in the same sentence

John said that his records are better than or at least as good as hers. John said that his records at their least are as good as hers. John said that his records are at their least as good as hers. ...
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

Is it fine to say in comparative degree?

D.r A.P.J Abdul Kalam was more wise and highly-educated than you think. Is it ok to place in that sentence “highly” before “educated” to make comparative degree with compound adjective?
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3 answers
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The ambiguous meaning of "He is better."

In A Comprehensive Grammar of The English Language, 7.77 comparison of good, well and ill, it says: He is better. is ambiguous between: (a) He is well again. (b) He is less ill. I can only ...
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5 votes
5 answers
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She is tall/ taller for her age by two inches

1.She is tall for her age by two inches. She is taller for her age by two inches. Which of the above two sentences is correct? If the two are correct, how?
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2 answers
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"Tank needs 8 minutes less" or "8 minutes lesser"

Is this question correct? Tank needs 8 minutes less to empty the tank than it needs to fill it. Should we use 'lesser' here as 'than' is used for comparison. Please clarify it.
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0 answers
56 views

Adverb clause of comparision

example1: “He is wiser that I” example2: “He is wiser than me”. I know example1 is correct and example2 is grammatically wrong. But please check the below conditions Sentence1: “I found her ...
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2 answers
1k views

"That much more so"

Two lines in the movie The Kingdom go: And after speaking with Thamer, I advised withholding additional U.S. Personnel, because a large part of the religious justification for these bombs is the ...
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5 votes
2 answers
608 views

Shouldn't "much" here be used instead of "more"?

I read a sentence in a chapter named "The Last Lesson" which was: It was because they were sorry, too, that they had not gone to school more. More is a comparative adjective. So I wonder in the ...
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0 votes
1 answer
92 views

is ‘fine’ in the sense ‘of very good quality’ gradable?

fine in the sense *of very good quality * seems somewhat an abosulte adjective. Since absolute adjectives are not gradable, I am wondering whether this principle applies to fine in the sense ‘of very ...
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1 answer
284 views

Which of the meanings of the adjective "mean" can have comparison or superlativeness?

Of of the gradable (synthetic) adjectives (adjective that have suffix of "-er" or "-est") is mean > meaner > meanest). Now looking at the dictionary, shows 7 meanings for this adjective! Adjective:...
0 votes
0 answers
352 views

Should vs Got to vs Have to

I understand that when using have to in a sentence, the meaning is clear - something needs to be done and there is no choice about it. For example: You have to have car insurance to drive a car. ...
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1 answer
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comparative degree in a run on sentence

>Mathematics is not an intramural sport, and as important as being first is, how one gets to one's destination is often as important as, if not more important than, the actual target. please help me ...
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1 answer
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What should be used with a person or 3rd person , comparative degree or simple form of adjective

A person is becoming good day by day. or A person is becoming better day by day. or A person is getting better day by day. or A person is being good day by day. Which one is correct and why?
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Comparitive degree as a Modifier!

The incident gave hardly an impact upon his vastly greater preoccupations Is comparative used as a modifier? If so, then how it could be used without any comparison shown in the sentence?
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1 answer
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"A little too (much) young" vs "A little bit too (much) young" vs "a bit too (much) young"

I often see phrases like "a little too much", "a little bit too small", "a bit too big", "a little bit too much old", "a little too heavy", and "a bit too old" and as far as I know it means "to some ...
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1 answer
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Better, more better or much better, which is correct?

Yesterday, I asked one of my students how he was. He answered, "I am more better." I told him that "I am (much) better" would do. He answered, I was already better yesterday, and I am better than I ...
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2 answers
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Usage of "compared to" [closed]

Which can I say? The price of A is higher compared to B. or The price of A is higher compared to the price of B.
1 vote
1 answer
618 views

The pattern of quite as adjective as

I'd like to ask what you understand from the following sentences, which I found randomly on the Internet Rooftop solar isn’t quite as great as you thought it was (but it’s still pretty great) ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Comparative degree or superlative degree?

Are these two sentences correct according to English grammar? Which story was longer? Which story was the longest? One of my colleagues said that the first question is wrong according to ...
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1 answer
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Degrees of comparison

This girl is more intelligent than the rest of the class. This girl is the most intelligent than the rest of the class. Which one is the right one? As far as I know, we use "than + comparative ...
6 votes
4 answers
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Use of “-er” or the word “more” to make comparative forms

To make a comparative form, one can add –er (as in ‘nearer’) in some cases or one can use the word “more” as a prefix (as in "more beautiful") in some others. Is there any rule that says where can ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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one of the more fascinating

Václav Havel was one of the more fascinating politicians of the last century. I would like to ask whether this sentence is correct. I would await the usage of superlative: Václav Havel was one of the ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Easier and much easier trouble

I read an article on ThinkProgress. Its heading is: The Republicans’ Sneaky Plan To Make It Much Easier To Pass Massive Tax Cuts For The Rich I know the term 'easier' that means 'more easy'. I ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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This winter is less cold than last one

I have a question about the word-usage of "less." Does the sentence "This winter is less cold than last one." make sense?
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42 votes
8 answers
129k views

The difference between "Older" and "Elder"

What is the difference between "Older" and "Elder" ? And are they interchangeable ?
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2 answers
122 views

"less than global reach"

The current teleport sector consists of four primary types of service providers, all with different strategies: • In-house broadcasters - a limited number of broadcasters that have ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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As fast as Or As fast?

He is as clever if not cleverer than his brother. Ranjeet is as fast as or perhaps faster than Rohit. Are both these sentences correct? As per Wren And Martin High School English Grammar And ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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Can we use superlative degree when comparing?

In my academics I've learnt that we use comparative degree when comparing any thing. But I shocked when my friend told me that this sentence is correct. The population of Tokyo is greatest among ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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Can "quite" modify adjectives and adverbs in the comparative degree?

They laughed, they cried, but it was not quite better than ''Cats.'' They were there, after all, to buy Memories. (The New York Times) “Oh my God! Wembley Stadium. Yeah, my God. So it’s going to be ...
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10 votes
7 answers
37k views

"bigger" vs. "more big"

As we know, comparatives compare two things. So, for example, we say that one thing is larger or more temperate than another thing. Now, let us consider the following examples. A. The African ...
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19 votes
3 answers
89k views

Is it "less than" or "lesser than"?

I often hear people say "less than", but shouldn't it be "lesser than"? Which one is correct?
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