Questions tagged [comparative]

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10
votes
4answers
26k views

“The most rude” or “the rudest”?

Rude comparative ruder superlative rudest But the most rude is applied in the following title: The Most Rude, ill-Mannered, and Humiliating Plays in NBA History! Can we use both forms for any ...
6
votes
1answer
8k views

“such that” & “such as to”, “so…that” &“so…as to”, “such…that” &“such …as to”

If the subjects of the main clause and the subordinate clause are the same, we could simplify "such that" to "such as to", for example 1a Her voice was such that it made everyone stare. → 1b ...
5
votes
2answers
660 views

Help parse “There is much more to preventing employee crime than background checks…”

Consider: There is much more to preventing employee crime than background checks and traditional audits. It's not just about the employees you don't know; some of the biggest crimes are committed ...
5
votes
1answer
224 views

Do monosyllabic past participles used as adjectives follow the comparative and superlative rules about adding -er/-est suffixes?

This question showed up in my Writing part of F.C.E. test when I wrote TV is the most bought electric household appliance In that moment, I wondered whether boughtest is the correct form instead ...
5
votes
3answers
40k views

'more preferred' versus 'preferable'

Which of the following two sentences is correct? a) Which of the two boxes is preferable ? b) Which of the two boxes is more preferred? I think it should be a) because Oxford dictionary ...
5
votes
2answers
72 views

Prettier a flower

Is This one is prettier a flower than a rose. acceptable? Or am I not allowed to invert it and have to say This one is a prettier flower than a rose. ?
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Tom is taller than I?

In this question, in one of the comment threads the following was stated Tom is taller than me" or "Tom is taller than I am" — both are correct. "Tom is taller than I" is WRONG` (link) Which I'...
5
votes
3answers
853 views

“The pain is less now than it was 5 hours ago” or should it be “lesser”?

The pain is less now than it was 5 hours ago Shouldn't it be "The pain is lesser now than it was 5 hours ago"?
4
votes
2answers
351 views

Parallel constructions in “than” sentences

Then out spake brave Horatius, The Captain of the Gate: "To every man upon this earth Death cometh soon or late. And how can man die better Than facing fearful odds, For the ashes of his fathers, And ...
4
votes
5answers
6k views

Twice as short, twice as cheap, twice as slow?

Is it grammatically correct to say: This book is twice as expensive as that one. That book is twice as cheap as this one. This rope is twice as long as that one. That rope is twice as ...
3
votes
5answers
6k views

The nuance of 'young' and 'younger' in this context

While reading Swan's Practical English Usage, I came across this sentence I don't do much sport now, but I did play football when I was younger. Why comparative younger? Simply young could have ...
3
votes
2answers
10k views

Near, Nearer, Nearest

a) Take me to a near station. b) Take me to a nearer station than that station. c) Take me to the nearest station. I believe a) is not used but b) and c) are. I want to hear a good explanation if ...
3
votes
2answers
378 views

Is such writing okay in the sentence?

We don't have to worry much, for with as so small an amount as is in his possession he won't go far and we'll eventually catch him. I've made up this sentence and I'd like to know if the "for with as ...
3
votes
2answers
842 views

Positive, comparative, superlative and… is there a fourth?

I'm wondering whether English has something beyond its superlative degree. In my language we call that "túlzófok", it literally translates to "exaggerative degree." I'm wondering because I often hear ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

“Wronger” and “wrongest” Vs. “more wrong” or “most wrong”

According to what I learnt, there are short and long adjectives. Short adjectives: one syllable. Long adjectives: two / three / four syllables. All of those short adjectives (one syllable) get ...
3
votes
2answers
56 views

When can two pronouns being compared in a sentence be of different types?

I came across a sentence on one of the pages on stackexchange today - He resents your being more popular than he is I always thought that while comparing two pronouns they should always be of the ...
3
votes
2answers
204 views

Is it grammatical to use a comparative form with a definite article?

A: Whose book is this? Yours? B: Oh, it's Mark's. Mine is -----. I know * Mine is thinner.* is correct. How about Mine is the thinner. Is it grammatical to add the article? Thanks a lot.
3
votes
1answer
38k views

“much more” or “far more”?

1: What is difference between "much more" or "far more"? 2: Is the incorrect sentence, below I mentioned, really wrong? 3: If so, how should I use "much more" or "far more"? Incorrect: Since her ...
3
votes
2answers
25 views

Long Ellipsis - Comparative

Is this sentence grammatically correct? "The current flowing through the transistor positioned at VCC5 is smaller than at VCC3." The meaning should be: "The current flowing through the transistor ...
3
votes
1answer
90 views

“twice the height of” is it a noun or an adjective?

[A] Which is correct? Tower A is twice the height of tower B. Tower A has twice the height of tower B. Is the phrase "the height of" used as a noun (height) or as an adjective (high)? ...
2
votes
1answer
11k views

Is “more than 2” includes 2?

In technical document in English, I read sentence of "more than 2". I usually just understand it as "two or more" since we generally translate it as similar sentence in Korean. (in Korean, there are ...
2
votes
2answers
21k views

More easily or most easily

I know when to use an adjective as comparative or superlative. Example - This is an easy job. This is easier than the previous one. This is the easiest. And when this way, we can't ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

Help understanding the differences between more than/about and most/all of

I am very confused when doing homework because there are four sentences which are really alike but my teacher said that they are different and I still don't understand why. "More than three-...
2
votes
3answers
25k views

“Early” vs “earlier” this morning / this month

While I was reading some various text below two things came up over and over like them in a rule. Early this morning (Ex. 4~5 AM) Earlier this month (Ex. 1~5 Nov.) If "early" and "earlier" were ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

Why is “with” not used here?

The sun rises earlier and earlier each day and sets later and later, so that the business man upon returning from his office can enjoy reading the evening news with the same degree of comfort that he ...
2
votes
2answers
70 views

When do we use more with adjective?

Is it when the comparative form of an adjective is not available? For example; •Conjuring 2 is more horrible than The Nun •Conjuring 2 is creepier than The Nun
2
votes
1answer
394 views

“More an X” vs. “More of an X”?

Are the following sentences grammatical? a. He is more a poet than a novelist in the traditional sense. b. They are more poets than novelists in the traditional sense. c. He is more of a ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the correct form (using a comparative adjective) of the sentence 'no other planet is so big as Jupiter'?

No other planet is bigger than Jupiter. or Jupiter is bigger than any other planet. Which of these is the 'correct form', using a comparative adjective, of the following sentence? No other ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Is using “madder” grammatically correct?

I've seen in several occasions many people using the comparative adjective "madder". Like in saying "I'm mad at him. But if he didn't ask I'll be even madder." This "madder" just doesn't sound ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

As fast as Or As fast?

He is as clever if not cleverer than his brother. Ranjeet is as fast as or perhaps faster than Rohit. Are both these sentences correct? As per Wren And Martin High School English Grammar And ...
2
votes
1answer
74 views

Adjectives for comparative clauses

So far, I learned that we can use the superlatives and comparatives such as: Bigger/biggest & smaller/smallest Larger/largest & smaller/smallest Higher/highest & lower/lowest and More/...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

comparison: is “faster than I thought” correct? [closed]

In a grammar book I find this question: Find the mistake The car run faster than I thought. Does this sentence have a grammar mistake? I guess not. Edit: I thought "run" is in the simple past ...
1
vote
2answers
75 views

Is it correct to say “with less”?

When I want to refer to something (which has the least amount of something), is it correct to say "with less"? For example: The house with less windows in the town.
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Which is right between these two sentences? “much easier” vs. “more easily”

The children learn a new language much easier than adults. The children learn a new language more easily than adults. I think 2 is right because easy modifies the verb, so it needs to be written ...
1
vote
2answers
36 views

Definite article “the” with comparative degree

I came across a sentence using definite article 'the' with comparative degree and an other sentence with out "the". Can anyone explain when to use 'the' with comparative degree? Here are the ...
1
vote
2answers
76 views

Why do they say “more richer”?

See this video (a captioned children's story) at 1:34 (1 minute & 34 seconds) They say, "He becomes even more richer than ever before" Is more richer idiomatic? Why don't they say "even much ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Does “quantitative” have a comparative and a superlative?

While academic fields can create their own algorithms for field-specific problems, they are all joined together by the same basic concepts about finding the best and most quantitative ways to ...
1
vote
1answer
829 views

word that describes advantages being “surpassed” or “exceeded” by disadvantages

For instance, a sports car might have all the technology and power but the high cost is its disadvantage compared to an average car. So "However, the advantage of high technology and power is _____ed ...
1
vote
2answers
403 views

Exclusion in formation of comparative statements

I was going through the topic "formation of comparative and superlative". The rule says When two objects are compared with each other, the latter term of comparison must exclude the former, ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

What does this comparative mean?

“Your Honor”.I raised my voice.“Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, I assure you that my master, Dennis Swift, in no way acted inappropriately around this young lady, Annika. It was clear to me that she ...
1
vote
2answers
179 views

Using “more” in a sentence without “than”. Grammatical?

If you include the word "more" in a sentence without "than" in spoken English, would it be valid? Example: a talk about steps how to resolve environmental issues. I'll get into them in more detail ...
1
vote
1answer
172 views

Question about comparative adjective

The question is about filling the blank with the best answer. (with the word given in the parentheses) 1. An eagle flies ........... a sparrow (high) a. Higher Than b. More Highly than ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

This book is comparatively cheap/cheaper than that one

I am confused at the usage of (comparatively+than). Please guide.
1
vote
1answer
19k views

How to use “more” as adjective and adverb

Where should I use more as adjective (comparative) and adverb? Sometimes, it seems like Mary does things only to make it more inconvenient for her husband to have a good time when he’s out with his ...
1
vote
2answers
61 views

“Tank needs 8 minutes less” or “8 minutes lesser”

Is this question correct? Tank needs 8 minutes less to empty the tank than it needs to fill it. Should we use 'lesser' here as 'than' is used for comparison. Please clarify it.
1
vote
1answer
35 views

The definite before comparative degree

Which is the cheaper of the two? is it correct or it should be Which is the cheapest of the two?
1
vote
1answer
54 views

“She is very envious of you…” vs “She is very envious that you…”

I stumbled upon this ELL question where the OP had a sentence She is very envious that you have more money than she does. Out of curiosity, I was wondering if I could rewrite it to any of these ...
1
vote
1answer
784 views

Do “The worstest” exist in english?

I am wondering if the word "the worstest" exists in English? It seems like people sometimes use it.I have never found it in my English grammar book. I am trying to find if it is a common mistake or ...
1
vote
1answer
270 views

Confusion of comparative adjective and/or adverb in a sentence

An adjective is that which tells something about a noun or a pronoun. And an adverb is that which describes a verb. However, I find sentences where an adjective is used to describe a verb as follows: ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

your better life

Can one say: When he sees your better life, he will be jealous. Instead of: When he sees your life, which is better than his, he will be jealous. Can one say: When he sees your better house,...