Questions tagged [complements]

For questions about expressions needed to complete the meaning of other expressions. Related to tags subject-complement and object-complement.

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When to use complement in relatives clauses?

Something I question daily is whether I should put a complement in a sentence or not when it comes to relative clauses. For example: Bullying ought not to be something that you should just "...
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It would be excellent experience for him

It would be excellent experience for him to travel a little. Clytemnestra is a pretentious name for a dog. (Reference: dictionary examples) I wonder if excellent experience for him is a noun phrase ...
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Do you need an extra complement in sentences like these?

When I speak English, I fear I might be unconsciously relying on the syntax of my mother tongue a little too much, which might end up with me creating ungrammatical sentences (and even ...
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2 answers
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"earn" and its ambiguity direct object

I earn my living by fighting on arena for many years as gladiator. There is some ambiguity in this sentence. In my opinion it convey two different meanings: 1. I earn (money/and so on) for my living ...
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Is 'watching him' a gerund clause in this example?

He saw James watching him. Recently, I have become familiar with non-finite clauses. This has led me to question the function of the ing- clause in constructions like the one above. Prior to learning ...
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whether it is a subject complement or a adjective complement

1.Hard work is fundamental to success. In a sentence above, whether is the PP "to success" an subjective complement or a adjective comeplement? and 2.Hard work to success is fundamental. ...
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Grammatical explanation of participle phrase (or gerund phrase) after verb + noun (see example)

They spend hours watching video on their phones. In this quote, is the phrase 'watching video on their phones' a present participle phrase or a gerund? If it is a participle phrase, surely it should ...
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a subject complement or an adjunct

They were crushed to death in the accident. In this case, is the preposition phrase(to death) a subject complement or an adjunct? It is hard to distinguish both. If neither isn't correct, what does ...
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SVC sentence structure confusion [closed]

I have read about SVC sentences like "we all feel sorry for him". Can I also write: The trunk wrinkled old and dry. As wrinkle is not a linking verb so is it incorrect? Is there any other ...
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subject complement or adverb phrase

I have a question about a sentence below. we expect about 50% of registered voters to vote in the election. Is a PP(in the election) a subject complement(is it possible?) or a modifier? If it is a ...
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2 votes
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What is "more carefully than I do" in "My wife drives more carefully than I do", grammatically?

Consider this sentence: My wife drives more carefully than I do. I want to understand the grammatical role of the phrase, more carefully than I do Is it an adverb, and adverb phrase, an adverb ...
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In noun complement

while studying a complement, I have a question in a sentence. The name was changed to avoid confusion with another firm. Is the preposition phrase(with another firm) a noun complement of the word '...
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Is 'cry' a catenative complement in this example?

In the provided example (below), is 'cry' considered a catenative complement? He made him cry. 'Him' is the object of 'made,' so 'cry' must be a complement. I know that a verb cannot function as an ...
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She was told a joke

She was told a joke Is a joke an object here? Or maybe a compulsory adjunct? Cuz I think she was told doesn't make sense on its own. I'm confused, can someone help?
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found his apartment broken into and his antique vase missing

Do native speakers find the following sentence natural? Joe found his apartment broken into and his antique vase missing.
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That- Clauses as Adjective Complements – How Do They Modify the Adjective?

Researching adjective complements, I have found the use of that- clauses quite jarring. The Free Dictionary lists the different types of adjective complements — prepositional phrases, infinitive ...
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difference between to be N, A / N, A [closed]

I have heard that cognitive verbs such as 'think, believe, consider, suppose, understand, imagine...etc.' should use 'to be noun' or 'to be adjective' in the object complement. She believed him to be ...
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Is "to be innocent" in the accused declared himself to be innocent the object complement?

The accused declared himself to be innocent. Got a quick question, is to be innocent the object complement?
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To infinitive as object complement

i have a question concerning whether "to resist" in the sentence below is an object complement. "He lacked the strength to resist"
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1 answer
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Verb+adjective into adverb+adjective

Can verb+adjective complement be freely inverted into adverb+adjective? For example: Something seems beautiful. It’s something seemingly beautiful. Something looks special. It’s something visually ...
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1 answer
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Get something hot

If I say "I want to get my coffee hot", (In the literal sense), does it mean I want to cause my coffee to be hot? or literally the same as "I want to receive my coffee hot"?
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It's a question about complements

It is important that he ________ what he is learning is worthwhile. a-believe / b-believes /c-to believe /d-believing Why is the answer of this question is a and not b?
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1 vote
1 answer
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Grammar and role of the word "protected"

What is the role of the word "protected" in the following sentence? She kept her money protected in a safe. I mean, she is the sub., kept is the v. and ... so what about the word "...
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1 answer
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Smell bright, taste bright

Smell bright and taste bright is grammatically correct, but why are they not used but look bright is used?
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What is ‘intelligent’ complementing in the beginning of this sentence?

I have the following sentence and diagram: To sound intelligent on political issues was Wayne’s goal. The infinitive phrase is the subject of the sentence. What is intelligent complementing exactly, ...
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be careful that-clause and be careful wh-clause

I'll be more careful what I say in the future. We were very careful that he didn't find out. The that-clause in sentence 2 is a complement of the adjective careful. The wh-clause in sentence 1 seems ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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When is a complement of verb gerund?

I am confused about when a complement of a verb is a gerund. For instance He is going to school. here "going" is the complement of verb "is" yet not a gerund He is playing for ...
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What's the difference between post attributive and complement?

After six months of arguing and final 16 hours of hot parliamentary debates, Australia's Northern Territory became the first legal authority in the world to allow doctors to take the lives of ...
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{past tense verb} [optional adverb] is... - what is this grammar?

I came across with this sentence Located on the Trusted Server is a private key named Certificate Authority (CA) I guess it's another way to say something like: "The thing that is located on ...
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Adjective or noun?

In the sentence "He became captain of the team", 'captain' (noun) is the subject complement of 'became' and 'of the team' (a PP) is the object complement of 'captain'. Since complements ...
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1 answer
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Kick someone to somewhere

Is it correct to say like that meaning to send someone there? Kick someone to hell
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Use to or Used to exercises , help me complete the sentence

When we were children, we ____________________ collect stamps. Mr. Wood ______________ read at leat four hours a day when he was young. John __________________ walk to school in the ...
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1 answer
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"Donna became quickly irritated"

Donna became quickly irritated. I'm confused about the position of "irritated". Is that considered as a direct object as it answered the verb "became"? I read it is a complement, why? Which type?
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"Starting" or "to start?"

What is the difference between them and when I should use -ing form and when -to+infinitive in similar cases? "I could see her eyes starting to tear up." or "I could see her eyes to ...
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Specifier, adjunct, or complement? how to know? syntax

How can I know if an embedded clause is a Specifier, an adjunct, or a complement? For example, in a sentence like: One notion that nobody has mentioned yet was proposed during the conference. Can ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Valency of being situated

Being situated seems to need some kind of complement. According to Cambridge Dictionary, it may be used in the following ways: with in/on/near/... with an adverb with a to-infinitive However, it ...
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to infinitive vs happen + to infinitive difference

Is there any difference between the following sentences, respectively? “It so happens that today is my birthday.” -- Today is my birthday. “I happen to have exactly what you need.” -- I have ...
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Grammatical function of "all" in "You ladies all have to understand its importance."

Does all within: You ladies all have to understand its importance. play the role of an adverb?
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3 votes
3 answers
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What is the grammatical function of the bold phrase in the sentence?

Some of the world's oldest preserved art is the cave art of Europe, most of it in Spain and France. The above sentence is from IELTS test reading passage, and it is oral English. I want to make ...
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1 answer
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How to distinguish the attribute & complement in a sentence?

As an example: In some cultures, people regard men as breadwinners. my textbook says: ''as breadwinners'' is the complement to ''regard'', but I think it is the attribute to ''men''. Which one is ...
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4 votes
2 answers
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Marking the functions of a sentence: 'She may like it'

I am reading Cambridge Grammar of English Language (CaGEL) all over again, though not cover to cover. One page no. 215, I came across The major functions in the structure of the clause are the ...
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1 answer
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complement omission after "than"

The average age is higher than it has been in recorded history. Can you tell me why "than it has been" doesn't have a complement in the sentence above?
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3 votes
4 answers
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How to parse this sentence "I heard him drop his keys."

"I heard him drop his keys" I = subject heard = verb "him drop his keys." = direct object. But how can I understand 'drop his keys'? "I heard him singing in the shower." Here, "singing in the ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Subject-dependent inversion

In front of him opens a magnificent view on mountains. Is such a subject-dependent inversion possible? Or should I use there opens a magnificent view on mountains in front of him?
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1 answer
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relative clause or object complement

Note that because every 2-element subset chosen from a set of 5 elements corresponds to a unique 3-element subset consisting of the elements not chosen. My questions concern whether consisting of the ...
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1 answer
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"That would be more than enough". Is 'more' the head of the complement or 'enough'?

It has over 100,000 words and meanings. You'd think that would be more than enough for most of us but meanings change and new words are being created all the time. Might I trouble you to tell me ...
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4 votes
3 answers
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two subject complements in passive form?

Hi I am English learner. Recently, I have a question. There is a sentence: He was selected chairman. On this passive form, I think the word selected is a subject complement. Therefore, He is ...
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2 answers
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Sentence structure , object and complement

He offered to lend the book to the student. Subject: He Verb: offered I don't know what the object should be, is it "to lend the book"? but then the object itself would be comprised of a verb and ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Intransitive verb + one's way construction

The following seems to be transitive verb + one's way constructions. She pushed her way through the crowd. She cut her way through the jungle. I parse that as this: S+V+O+O.C Yet, the ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Nominal to-infinitive clause as complement of an adjective

Source: "A Cmmunicative Grammar of English" by Geoffrey Leech and Jan Svartvik (p.328-329) As you can see, the book says: ● Nominal to-fininitive clause as subject: To say there is no ...
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