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Questions tagged [complements]

For questions about expressions needed to complete the meaning of other expressions. Related to tags subject-complement and object-complement.

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to infinitive vs happen + to infinitive difference

Is there any difference between the following sentences, respectively? “It so happens that today is my birthday.” -- Today is my birthday. “I happen to have exactly what you need.” -- I have ...
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0answers
24 views

Grammatical function of “all” in “You ladies all have to understand its importance.”

Does all within: You ladies all have to understand its importance. play the role of an adverb?
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3answers
47 views

What is the grammatical function of the bold phrase in the sentence?

Some of the world's oldest preserved art is the cave art of Europe, most of it in Spain and France. The above sentence is from IELTS test reading passage, and it is oral English. I want to make ...
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1answer
22 views

How to distinguish the attribute & complement in a sentence?

As an example: In some cultures, people regard men as breadwinners. my textbook says: ''as breadwinners'' is the complement to ''regard'', but I think it is the attribute to ''men''. Which one is ...
4
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2answers
209 views

Marking the functions of a sentence: 'She may like it'

I am reading Cambridge Grammar of English Language (CaGEL) all over again, though not cover to cover. One page no. 215, I came across The major functions in the structure of the clause are the ...
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1answer
25 views

complement omission after “than”

The average age is higher than it has been in recorded history. Can you tell me why "than it has been" doesn't have a complement in the sentence above?
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4answers
88 views

How to parse this sentence “I heard him drop his keys.”

"I heard him drop his keys" I = subject heard = verb "him drop his keys." = direct object. But how can I understand 'drop his keys'? "I heard him singing in the shower." Here, "singing in the ...
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1answer
25 views

Subject-dependent inversion

In front of him opens a magnificent view on mountains. Is such a subject-dependent inversion possible? Or should I use there opens a magnificent view on mountains in front of him?
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1answer
27 views

relative clause or object complement

Note that because every 2-element subset chosen from a set of 5 elements corresponds to a unique 3-element subset consisting of the elements not chosen. My questions concern whether consisting of the ...
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1answer
35 views

“That would be more than enough”. Is 'more' the head of the complement or 'enough'?

It has over 100,000 words and meanings. You'd think that would be more than enough for most of us but meanings change and new words are being created all the time. Might I trouble you to tell me ...
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3answers
179 views

two subject complements in passive form?

Hi I am English learner. Recently, I have a question. There is a sentence: He was selected chairman. On this passive form, I think the word selected is a subject complement. Therefore, He is ...
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2answers
26 views

Sentence structure , object and complement

He offered to lend the book to the student. Subject: He Verb: offered I don't know what the object should be, is it "to lend the book"? but then the object itself would be comprised of a verb and ...
2
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1answer
24 views

Intransitive verb + one's way construction

The following seems to be transitive verb + one's way constructions. She pushed her way through the crowd. She cut her way through the jungle. I parse that as this: S+V+O+O.C Yet, the ...
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1answer
136 views

Nominal to-infinitive clause as complement of an adjective

Source: "A Cmmunicative Grammar of English" by Geoffrey Leech and Jan Svartvik (p.328-329) As you can see, the book says: ● Nominal to-fininitive clause as subject: To say there is no ...
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1answer
28 views

Is it distransitive or complex transitive as in “She told her cat to leave”?

She told her cat to leave. Here are two kinds of parsing. 1.Distransitive + indirect object and direct object She (S) + told (V) her cat (I.O) to leave (D.O) 2.Complex transitive + direct ...
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1answer
37 views

Complements: -ing form or infinitives

Not sure if this was already discussed, but I am confused about the use of -ing form/infinitives as complements. I've found in several threads in Stack Exchange that the verb "to be" has to be ...
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2answers
36 views

When is inversion between the subject and the object or the subject and the complement possible?

When is inversion between the subject and the object or the subject and the complement possible? For instance: I stood at the window watching the kids play. <---> At the window watching the ...
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1answer
48 views

Why is “difference” used following “is”?

Could anyone please explains to me when to use "different" and when to use "difference"? I searched the web about that and I have seen that difference is a noun and different is an adjective and for ...
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2answers
62 views

Should I use “is” or “has” here?

I am confused about how to use "is" or "has" in one way or the other. Is it correct to say " he is gone to the back gate " or it should be "he has gone to the back gate" because I think "gone is a ...
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3answers
71 views

“A Thai youth soccer team were found alive Monday” Why is an adjective “alive” following a verb “found”? or “found alive” is an idiom?

I have read this sentence in a newspaper of USA Today, "Thai soccer team found alive after 10 days lost in caves": A Thai youth soccer team and its coach were found alive Monday in a vast, flooded ...
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2answers
50 views

These terms are important for me to work here happily

Can I use infinitive clauses in that way? 1-) These terms are important for me to work here happily. 2-) These terms are important to work here happily.(If it is obvious that I am talking ...
0
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2answers
51 views

Do we have to use adjective complements just after adjectives?

Examples: I had already been very sorry but with your behaviour, I was extremely disappointed. (Instead of "but I was extremely disappointed with your behaviour") I was good at software ...
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0answers
59 views

I prevented you from going there

I prevented you from going there. What is the function of "from going there" ? I think that it is an adverbial prepositional phrase because I have studied object complements and learned that ...
2
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2answers
161 views

Why can we say “Enough money to do something” but not “a ready machine to do something”?

We can say: I have enough money to go to Italy. Which means: I have money which is enough to go to Italy But why does the following sentence not work? I have a ready machine to run for 10 ...
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1answer
102 views

The complements of linking verbs

We know that the complements of action verbs can be neither an adjective nor a prepositional phrase, but, it seems that that situation changes for linking verbs. He was upstairs. "Upstairs" ...
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0answers
26 views

How scared are you of snakes?

Do you think that it is grammatically correct to ask questions by leaving adjective complements alone? How happy are you about the exam results? How disappointed were you with my last ...
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1answer
34 views

Directly asking questions about adjective complements

Can we ask some questions about adjective complements? I was disappointed with your behaviour.(1) Can we ask its question like With what were you disappointed? (2) or What were you ...
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1answer
36 views

I want to be a good person to invite to a party

Can we say this sentence is grammatically correct English? I want to be a good person to invite to a party. The intended meaning is: I want to be a person who is good to invite to a party. ...
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2answers
65 views

Is “The way we are learning English is not good” a clause?

Can I call the following a clause? The way we are learning English is not good. Here, what kind of clause is "The way we are learning English" I think it's a noun clause because it sits before ...
2
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1answer
33 views

the icing on the cake: Is 'on the cake' an adjunct or complement?

It's the icing on the cake. Here, is on the cake an adjunct or a complement of the noun icing?
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2answers
89 views

The first thing I can see in this picture ‘are’ 2 people

The first thing I can see in this picture are 2 people I happened to see this sentence, and it says using 'is' instead of 'are' is wrong. As I looked up some grammar stuff, you can invert the ...
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2answers
197 views

Is this to-infinitive clause an adjunct or a complement?

He'll keep his pledge to donate 10,000 mosquito nets to charity to help fight Malaria in Africa. In this sentence, is the to-infinitive in bold a complement or an adjunct of purpose? Perhaps more ...
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2answers
128 views

SPEND [a period of time] ENGAGED/ENGAGING in something

I came across the following sentence in the book - ORIGIN - written by Dan Brown Since 1893, hundreds of spiritual leaders from nearly thirty world religions had gathered in a different location ...
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2answers
489 views

“Did I hear that correctly?” or “Did I hear that correct?” Which one is correct?

This is a conversation in the film "A Wish for Christmas", you can download its subtitle on the internet The boss is talking on the phone: Boss: Frankly, the way things are going, Christmas is ...
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1answer
26 views

Confused “Complements and adjuncts” in these sentences “Did I hear this correct?” & “Am I reading this right?”

Source Complements and adjuncts are different. A complement is necessary in order to complete the meaning. An adjunct is not necessary, and adds extra information. Compare He put the cake ...
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1answer
35 views

…waited until recently…[Is 'until recently' a complement of 'waited'?]

This article says in part: Though the White House first announced his nomination in April, lobbyists waited until recently to begin publicly mounting an aggressive opposition effort. Is 'until ...
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3answers
2k views

What is passive voice of 'I have a pen to write'?

My question is in continuation to this question : Is there a passive construction for 'I have a pen.' Wherein it is said that no passive possible for 'I have a pen' since it has 'have' as ...
2
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1answer
348 views

Gerunds and complements in a sentence

What's the role of the word flying in both sentences and drones in the latter, please? Troy enjoys flying. Losi's hobby is flying drones. And how to differentiate between a gerund and a complement ...
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3answers
316 views

Complement or Adv. Prepositional Phrase?

I'm having trouble identifying/breaking down the components of an example under Adverb Prepositional Phrases in McGraw-Hill's English and Grammar Usage book. Here's the example with the Adv. PP ...
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2answers
1k views

Personal Pronouns and complement of verb be

Which personal pronouns are complement of verb be? First example: A: It was him who broke the window pane. or B: It was he who broke the window pane. Second example: C: It’s me. Can you ...
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1answer
17 views

What is the meaning of “I read the catcher the signal”?

What is the meaning of "I read the catcher the signal" ? Does "I read the catcher the signal" mean "I read the catcher's signal" ? Or does it mean "I read the singal and I give the signal to the ...
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1answer
305 views

Complements nicely?

While writing a resume for a friend, I had a debate with my family over whether or not an adjective should be used to describe how something 'complements' something else. For example: "My experience ...
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1answer
19 views

Do we need to add again “complementiser-that” before “the second clause”

The two advantages of self-service are that there is no waiting to be served and that there is a wide variety of choice. Do we need to add again "complementiser-that" before "the second clause".
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1answer
114 views

Can we use an adjective to modify a verb?

'A confident person speaks a little stronger, stands a little taller, and looks a little bolder'. I read the sentence in the book Instant Voice Training. In this sentencen, both the verb speaks and ...
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1answer
362 views

Is “chicken” a modifier in “chicken soup”?

Wikipedia says "chicken" is an adjunct which modifies the head noun "soup." But I think this analysis is a little bit weird. How could it be modifying "soup"? "Chicken" doesn't seem to be describing ...
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3answers
324 views

To-Infinitive Phrase with an explicit subject?

Hey guys. In these sentences: I wanted her to do it; I need you to do it; How should the bolded parts be treated? Either as: a To-Infinitive Phrase (To do it) with an explicit subject (...
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4answers
4k views

Why has “strangely” been used instead of “strange” in the sentence “Harry felt strangely”?

Isn't "feel" a linking verb here? If so, shouldn't "strange" be used in lieu of "strangely"? A tinkling bell rang somewhere in the depths of the shop as they stepped inside. It was a tiny place, ...
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1answer
30 views

position of “by about 12 minutes”

1.My watch is by about 12 minutes fast. 2.My watch is fast by about 12 minutes. Which position is better for the completement "by about 12 minutes"?
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1answer
61 views

The managers did not know whom to trust

I don't know why the writer use 'to' before verb 'trust'. Following is the pattern used in a verb 'trust' "trust somebody to do something" Now, why we use 'to' before trust? The managers did ...
3
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1answer
90 views

Is the bold phrase an object complement?

I read the following paragraph from a book and I want to confirm whether the bold phrase is an object complement or a subject complement? Then The New York Times wrote an absolute rave review of ...