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Questions tagged [connected-speech]

For questions about differences in the way spoken English sounds when an utterance is a continuous stream of sound instead of each word being pronounced in isolation.

1
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1answer
39 views

They took an umbrella with them. It might rain. Connect these two sentences with the phrase in case

They took an umbrella with them. It might rain. Connect these two sentences with the phrase in case. The right answer is: They took an umbrella with them in case it rained/ should rain. Can ...
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2answers
189 views

“Someone else than me” correct analogy?

Here's an example sentence: I couldn't expect you loved someone else than me. Or something like that, you get the meaning. I tried googling "Someone else of me", "Someone else than me". None of ...
0
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1answer
76 views

It tastes like chicken(pronunciation-unstressed end consonant?)

When a particular new food is given to you, and you tasted it, you say: "Nice! It tasteS like chicken!'' Do you say it with stressed S sound or you don't have to? Because I heard from BBC learning ...
0
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2answers
73 views

How often do English speakers mishear an important and unimportant?

I know it's silly, but it's been bugging me for a while. Namely, the word unimportant and combination "an important". Whenever I pronounce them I cant' get rid of a feeling that they sound the same, ...
12
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5answers
1k views

Proper way to pronounce “Middle of” in GenAm English

I was watching anime and noticed the sentence "In the middle of the city". So I wonder how would I pronounce middle of in American English. Should I connect sounding sort of like "middle+love"? Or ...
1
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1answer
73 views

“With the” Does one pronounce both “th” sounds?

Take the random sentence "Start with the basics." Would you pronounce both "th" sounds separately or link them essentially saying "withe". Being a non native speaker I find pronouncing both difficult ...
3
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2answers
342 views

do they sometimes omit the /d/ , /t/ sounds of the -ed ending?

In the phrase CCTV, closed circuit television; do we omit the -ed, and just say /kləʊz-sərkət-.../ in fast, connected speech. And, about the word "closed" itself, is it finished with an /zd/ or /st/ ...
4
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3answers
458 views

What is the pronunciation of “Will you” in fast/connected speech?

I usually pronounce "will you" as "/wɪ/ + /lju:/", but seems that people have some troubles understanding me (at least here in the UK). Is my pronunciation wrong? That's the way we usually make the ...
2
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2answers
588 views

Is the /t/ sound in “stopped” not pronounced in “we stopped for petrol”?

I'm wondering if all /t/ sounds which are at the end of a word are often omitted in British English when it is followed by a consonant when you are speaking normally fast? As I've noticed that it ...
4
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1answer
87 views

AmEng: Is the T tapped (flap) in the compound noun heart attack?

Is the T tapped (flap) in the compound noun: heart attack? I'm talking about the T in the word "heart".
1
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1answer
84 views

Casual English: Dropping the The Verb BE

I heard the question: "What are you talking about?" frequently in American movies. However I notice they tend to drop the verb "are" and treat "y" as a vowel. The /t/ in the word "what" sounds like a ...
3
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1answer
1k views

How do i know if the word is stressed in English?

Yesterday I had a lesson about stressed words. My question is how do i know if the word is stressed or not without listening to the pronunciation? Examples He wants a job that lets them ...
2
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1answer
544 views

In the natural way of speaking, How to pronounce “next stop”?

If I were reading this phrase I would read "next" "stop", but when people talks it seems to me they say something like "nextop". Is this a sort of shortening like "acopotee" instead of "a cup of tea"?