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Questions tagged [connotations]

This tag is for questions regarding the associated or underlying meaning of a word, in addition to its primary definition.

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1answer
2k views

Indulge/gratify my curiosity?

I understand that indulge and gratify have similar meanings but what are the differnces in connotations of these words in this sentences? Indulge my curiosity Or gratify my curiosity
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2answers
47 views

Usage of verb drag

Is this sentence valid usage of verb drag? "my persistence dragged me to solve it" I want to say that I solved challenges due to my persistence which "encouraged" me.
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1answer
253 views

What's the difference between meaning of 'A happy new year' and 'Happy new year'?

Their appearance different is the sentence has 'A' whether or not, but I have heard both... What's their difference? or no difference?
2
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1answer
267 views

Does “polemic” always have a negative connotation?

I have seen a political discussion on live tv in germany. After attacking a member of the discussion made some solid arguments the attacked person responded by saying what he is saying is pure polemic....
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1answer
786 views

Can the word “exposure” be used to mean something positive?

I want to say something along the lines of: "I believe that the exposure I would gain through being involved in such a wide range of tasks would enable me to..." (that's not the exact sentence, so ...
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2answers
3k views

What could be a plan status higher than “pro”? [closed]

I am developing a web application that currently has a pro plan for users. What could be the appropriate word for the next level plan? I do not want to use the word ultimate because the word can ...
0
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1answer
98 views

What does nuance of “should” in this situation

I learn english and have difficult time to understand "should" nuance in english. In my language there is many ways to describe give suggestions and advice and nuance is all different,nice way or ...
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3answers
336 views

Difference between “abolish” and “rescind”

I have attempted an English test, where a question was given as Following the students’ ______, the authorities have finally_______ the rule of having CCTV’s in the classroom. And the options were ...
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2answers
462 views

Is the use of the adjective “pedantic” always derogatory?

The adjective "pedantic" is sometimes used derogatorily. Can it be used in a neutral or positive context? In other words, if person A refers person B as pedantic, can it sometimes be used as a ...
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5answers
966 views

What is the connotation of the word “Lightninged” when using it as a name of a product for education?

I chose the word Lightninged (not lightning) to name a product. It means literally be struck by a lightning, and it is a real word as discussed in ELU: What is the past tense of “lightning”?. The name ...
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1answer
175 views

What is the nuance difference between “yourself” and “your way”?

What is the nuance difference between "Eat yourself healthy" and "Eat your way healthy"? (I tried first searching on Google, but I cannot find a similar question, and comparing "yourself" and "your ...
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8answers
11k views

Could the word “interesting” have negative meaning?

Example: Joe's presentation about the techniques of sharing code between the web and native version of an app was interesting. Can the word "interesting" have a negative meaning in this context? ...
2
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2answers
847 views

without this and/or that

With negation, or is motly used. He doesn't like this or that. But with without, I see both forms. When I searched CCAE, it returned result with both or and and. Like this: I was there ...
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2answers
4k views

Which one is more idiomatic - “Occurs to me” or “Occurred to me”?

When you're trying to simplify a complex concept and say "Well, looking at this equation, the first thing that occurs to me/ comes to my mind is..." or is it idiomatic and perfectly fine to ...
3
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2answers
20k views

Which one is better?: Do you need a/any/some help?

How is the nuance of each one? Do you need help? Do you need a help? Do you need any help? Do you need some help? May I help you? And which one should I use to offer some strangers ...
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3answers
23k views

Sorry, I didn't recognize “you”, or “your voice”?

Someone calls you on the phone, but you don't know who they are. The conversation goes like: Caller: "GIBBERISH... GIBBERISH... GIBBERISH..." You: "Um.. Who am I speaking with, please?" Caller: "...
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1answer
147 views

difference between the and a in this context with relative clause

What is the difference between those sentences? He is the person I needed for the job. He is a person I needed for the job. And... This is not a place I wanted to go. This is ...
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3answers
2k views

Is the word 'expensive' negative or neutral?

I'm not a native speaker of English. I'm trying to teach English learners positive and negative words. I found this word in students' textbook, which only gives me the choice between positive and ...
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2answers
5k views

“I was leaving” vs “I left”

I'm curious of the meaning of the usage of the past tense in this example: I was the last to leave the office last night. The first option: Everybody else had gone home when I left The second: ...
2
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1answer
3k views

Are reluctant and hesitant interchangeable?

I kind of have an idea that "reluctant" and "hesitant" both have similar meanings, but I do not know the actual difference in the nuances they have. Could someone please teach me?
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1answer
4k views

“In such environment” vs “In such an environment”

I'd like to ask if there is any difference between In such environment, we... and In such an environment, we... If yes, then what does each phrase mean? If anyone happens to know the ...
0
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1answer
66 views

Can I row this boat to the water's edge?

Can a person in a rowboat, while he is in the middle of a lake, say "I am now going to row the boat to the water's edge"? I can imagine a man in a boat, in the middle of a lake, looking towards the ...
3
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2answers
836 views

Is emotional a negative word?

I have learned English from TV shows, movies, CNN, Discovery channel, and NGC for years. One of my USA friend told me emotional is a negative word such as " Do not be emotional! Yelling and being ...
3
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2answers
1k views

How come “oblivion” means “void”?

Oxford English Dictionary, 3rd edition (2004) says: oblivion, n. 2. a. The state or condition of being forgotten; (also, more generally) obscurity, nothingness, void, death. However, what ...
2
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1answer
588 views

This earring “menaces with spikes of…”: is the earring just dangerous or menacing?

This is a native aluminum earring. All craftsmanship is of the highest quality. It is studded with bismuth bronze and decorated with water buffalo leather. This object is adorned with hanging ...
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2answers
1k views

How to politely explain to someone that their lack of clarity is due to their ignorance?

I've been in an inconvenient situation where I ask a question and there's a comment suggestion that it's unclear, vague, off-topic, pointless, etc. Usually, I try to apprehend that by a disclaimer ...
0
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1answer
563 views

Chips vs Fries: was this a tongue-in-cheek joke in “A Fish Called Wanda”? [closed]

Here's a familiar sight: We call them French fries, or just fries, in the States, as well as in Canada. They're often referred to as chips over in England. In France they are, of course, good old ...
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2answers
6k views

Does “cleverly” have a negative, positive or neutral meaning?

I wrote this sentence and I would like to know whether the word "cleverly" is positive, negative (like e.g. cunningly) or neutral. Lose weight cleverly in the privacy and comfort of your home!
4
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1answer
694 views

The connotation of the expression “Jack of all trades, master of none”

A recent thread in the Portuguese Language SE are intending to find a Portuguese version for the expression "Jack of all trades, master of none". The question is: The original expression could have ...
11
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6answers
3k views

May I use “naive” to mean “inexperienced”?

Sometimes I may use "naive" in sentences like I am naive in writing this type of articles To say "inexperienced" I would like to know how common this word is among native speakers of English, or ...
2
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2answers
3k views

how to differentiate between “implication” and“ connotation”?

While I have studied some resources as to these terms, in fact, I cannot yet get what could be considered as their difference. Or, when could they be interchangeable, when not? Any comment would ...
5
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1answer
414 views

What kind of food is referred to as “sushi” in English?

A sequel to this CAPTCHA question, but no one posts for me this time so... legends (image #) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 It was this test that prevented me from being a human, for I couldn't ...
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1answer
119 views

Implication of “you have to realize”

Is the phrase neutral, like "you need to know", or it has some negative connotations?
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3answers
1k views

Does gorgeous carry a sexual connotation?

From dictionaries, gorgeous means very beautiful (macmillan) Beautiful; very attractive (Oxford) But I wonder if calling someone gorgeous, as in she is gorgeous, means beautiful in a sexual way....
0
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1answer
205 views

What does 'dalliance' mean here? [closed]

"So much preparation had gone into the diplomatic date that a US-India dalliance at the end of it was a foregone conclusion." Does foregone conclusion mean that a US-India dalliance was not ...
4
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6answers
2k views

How does a native speaker choose one word over its synonym(s)?

In a recent speech, Senator Ted Cruz said: ... And under no circumstances will Iran be allowed to acquire a nuclear weapon. Would it have also been correct to use synonyms such as obtain, secure,...
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2answers
332 views

Connotation of “laundry list”

Does "laundry list" have any negative connotation? Or can it be used synonymously to "long list" in informal contexts?
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2answers
353 views

“[…]you'll see them all run for cover”?

Recently in a different context I was presented with something like this: [When something big happens], you'll see them all run for cover. At first I thought this was very idiomatic, but when I ...
1
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2answers
8k views

Meaning and connotation of “_______ your heart out”

What does _____ your heart out mean? Does it carry a positive connotation or a negative one? For example: work your heart out. Does this mean that you like working, so you should do it to your ...
13
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2answers
14k views

Living by himself vs Living on his own

What is the difference between these sentences below in terms of meaning? He lives by himself. He lives on his own If you ask me, the first sentence connotes that he doesn't have a ...
3
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1answer
2k views

to evolve in a negative way

In "everyday spoken English", can we use evolve in the sense of the opposite of optimization/improvement? If something evolves, does it necessarily imply that it is for a better, or can it just be ...
4
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2answers
9k views

Does “the likes of” usually have a pejorative connotation?

Does the sentence I admire heroes the likes of Batman and Superman. sound wrong? Because I usually hear the likes of in sentences such as Don't compare me to the like(s) of you! But according ...
2
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2answers
10k views

Does the phrase “voice an opinion” have some negative connotations?

Does the phrase voice an opinion have some negative connotations? For example let us take this sentence: User123456 in several comments on meta recently voiced the opinion that creation of a tag ...
2
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1answer
109 views

Is “consign” a negative verb?

I consulted Definition 1, in which the definition and examples are ambiguous about the connotation. Yet Definition 1.2 is surely negative: '...to be rid ....' So what's the connotation? I thought to ...
2
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1answer
2k views

How rude is it to “spit” on somebody?

My friend presented his research topic in front of my professor. He was asked a question about it, but he had difficulty in answering it and was upset for a while. Then my professor (translated): "...
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4answers
32k views

What is the difference between “within” and “inside”?

Here is the definition of the word within from Oxford Dictionary: inside (something) So does that mean the two words have no difference, and can be used exchangingly? Is there any connotation that ...
9
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4answers
15k views

Usage of “mad” and “crazy” in conversational english?

From English movies, I have got an impression to signify that a person is mentally ill, it is said "He is crazy" and that a person is angry upon somebody is signified by "He is mad on her". Although ...
4
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3answers
954 views

What are the connotations of the word 'disorder' for a native speaker?

What connotations does the word disorder have for a native speaker? Does it sound very negative or rather neutral? It's still better to describe phenomena such as ADHD as mental illness, but it still ...