Questions tagged [connotations]

This tag is for questions regarding the associated or underlying meaning of a word, in addition to its primary definition.

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11
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6answers
3k views

May I use “naive” to mean “inexperienced”?

Sometimes I may use "naive" in sentences like I am naive in writing this type of articles To say "inexperienced" I would like to know how common this word is among native speakers of English, or ...
2
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2answers
4k views

how to differentiate between “implication” and“ connotation”?

While I have studied some resources as to these terms, in fact, I cannot yet get what could be considered as their difference. Or, when could they be interchangeable, when not? Any comment would ...
5
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1answer
443 views

What kind of food is referred to as “sushi” in English?

A sequel to this CAPTCHA question, but no one posts for me this time so... legends (image #) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 It was this test that prevented me from being a human, for I couldn't ...
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1answer
122 views

Implication of “you have to realize”

Is the phrase neutral, like "you need to know", or it has some negative connotations?
3
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3answers
1k views

Does gorgeous carry a sexual connotation?

From dictionaries, gorgeous means very beautiful (macmillan) Beautiful; very attractive (Oxford) But I wonder if calling someone gorgeous, as in she is gorgeous, means beautiful in a sexual way....
0
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1answer
211 views

What does 'dalliance' mean here? [closed]

"So much preparation had gone into the diplomatic date that a US-India dalliance at the end of it was a foregone conclusion." Does foregone conclusion mean that a US-India dalliance was not ...
4
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6answers
2k views

How does a native speaker choose one word over its synonym(s)?

In a recent speech, Senator Ted Cruz said: ... And under no circumstances will Iran be allowed to acquire a nuclear weapon. Would it have also been correct to use synonyms such as obtain, secure,...
1
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2answers
387 views

Connotation of “laundry list”

Does "laundry list" have any negative connotation? Or can it be used synonymously to "long list" in informal contexts?
0
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2answers
445 views

“[…]you'll see them all run for cover”?

Recently in a different context I was presented with something like this: [When something big happens], you'll see them all run for cover. At first I thought this was very idiomatic, but when I ...
1
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2answers
11k views

Meaning and connotation of “_______ your heart out”

What does _____ your heart out mean? Does it carry a positive connotation or a negative one? For example: work your heart out. Does this mean that you like working, so you should do it to your ...
13
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2answers
18k views

Living by himself vs Living on his own

What is the difference between these sentences below in terms of meaning? He lives by himself. He lives on his own If you ask me, the first sentence connotes that he doesn't have a ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

to evolve in a negative way

In "everyday spoken English", can we use evolve in the sense of the opposite of optimization/improvement? If something evolves, does it necessarily imply that it is for a better, or can it just be ...
5
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3answers
12k views

Does “the likes of” usually have a pejorative connotation?

Does the sentence I admire heroes the likes of Batman and Superman. sound wrong? Because I usually hear the likes of in sentences such as Don't compare me to the like(s) of you! But according to ...
2
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2answers
11k views

Does the phrase “voice an opinion” have some negative connotations?

Does the phrase voice an opinion have some negative connotations? For example let us take this sentence: User123456 in several comments on meta recently voiced the opinion that creation of a tag ...
2
votes
1answer
118 views

Is “consign” a negative verb?

I consulted Definition 1, in which the definition and examples are ambiguous about the connotation. Yet Definition 1.2 is surely negative: '...to be rid ....' So what's the connotation? I thought to ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

How rude is it to “spit” on somebody?

My friend presented his research topic in front of my professor. He was asked a question about it, but he had difficulty in answering it and was upset for a while. Then my professor (translated): "...
12
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4answers
43k views

What is the difference between “within” and “inside”?

Here is the definition of the word within from Oxford Dictionary: inside (something) So does that mean the two words have no difference, and can be used exchangingly? Is there any connotation that ...
10
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4answers
18k views

Usage of “mad” and “crazy” in conversational english?

From English movies, I have got an impression to signify that a person is mentally ill, it is said "He is crazy" and that a person is angry upon somebody is signified by "He is mad on her". Although ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

What are the connotations of the word 'disorder' for a native speaker?

What connotations does the word disorder have for a native speaker? Does it sound very negative or rather neutral? It's still better to describe phenomena such as ADHD as mental illness, but it still ...

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