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Questions tagged [consonants]

This tag is for questions about the pronunciation and orthographic representation of consonants.

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Are /x/, the glottal stop /ʔ/, the nasal vowels /æ̃/ and /ɒ̃/, the rhotic vowels /ɚ/ and /ɝ/, and /ɜː/ (marginal) phonemes?

Are /x/, the glottal stop /ʔ/, the nasal vowels /æ̃/ and /ɒ̃/, the rhotic vowels /ɚ/ and /ɝ/, and /ɜː/ (marginal) phonemes? Some of then are obviously not standard phonemes in their own right, but I ...
thesmartwaterbear's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
67 views

Which syllable does a consonant belong to?

I understand each syllable contains one vowel sound, but don't understand whether a consonant is with its preceding vowel or its following vowel. For example, monosyllabic has 5 syllables according to ...
dmjy's user avatar
  • 275
2 votes
1 answer
993 views

Aspirated voiceless plosives after consonants at the end of words

It is my understanding that: Voiceless stops are aspirated at the beginning of a word, and at the beginning of a stressed syllable. Voiceless stops are unaspirated at the beginning of an unstressed ...
Darvid's user avatar
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1 answer
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Are there more than 44 phonemes in English?

I was using English words to teach Malayalam consonants when I noticed that Malayalam has separate characters for the alveolar and retroflex versions of the same consonant. But I also noticed that ...
Kurien Kalarickal's user avatar
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0 answers
213 views

Have difficulty in pronouncing /g/

I noticed myself have this problem recently. When I pronounce /g/, I get a result like a mix of /g/ and /d/, is there any suggestions on how to train and improve this point? I can hear the sound ...
user avatar
19 votes
2 answers
3k views

Why is editted wrong?

The general rule is that when we have vowel + consonant + vowel we should double the consonant, in order to properly pronounce the whole word. The examples include: submitted , shipping, etc. So why ...
Snack Exchange's user avatar
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2 answers
127 views

Which of the two different pronunciations of /z/ is correct?

When I was learning the English phonemes, I noticed that the phoneme represented by /z/ was pronounced significantly differently in the two tutorials I had purchased. I had thought that maybe one of ...
Andy's user avatar
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2 answers
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How to pronounce words starting with a "v" fast?

I just learned that recently from this video, how do words like "one" are pronounced differently from "van", the latter need to using the bottom lip to touch the upper teeth to ...
Jack the Ranger's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
258 views

Can any native English speakers hear the flap t sound in "But I..." in the clip?

There are five segments in the clip. Are all the ts in "But I..." pronounced out the flap t sound? I personally can hear the flap t sound in the second and third segments. The first and ...
questionguy's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
138 views

How to pronounce "Attached to"?

I pronounce "attached to" like "attach to" when the two words are linked and spoken a little fast ([əˈtætʃ.tə]). Is this OK? Or do I have to say [əˈtætʃt.tə]?
DH K's user avatar
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2 answers
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Pronunciation of 'pronunciation' with an intrusive T

According to the dictionaries, pronunciation is pronounced pruh-nuhn-see-ey-shuhn. However, do native English speakers really say [see] instead of [tsee] even when talking fast? For instance, I hear [...
Probably's user avatar
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13 votes
3 answers
4k views

Why are "LOse" and "LOOse" pronounced differently?

I know that both the words are pronounced and used differently. I also found another question on this site: "Use of loose and lose [closed]", but that is about the usage of the word. My ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
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Pronunciation of [bunch'ed' together]: "ch+ed+t" cluster

The sheep "bunched together" as soon as they saw the dog. VERY HARD to pronounce [~ed t~] together "~ed" here is like "t" or "d"? There are many [ch+ed] words. ...
gomadeng's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
248 views

Why is this so that some consonants take final or front position in words?

I noticed this in many words e.g. puLP, the cluster /lp/ can take place in final position but not front. e.g. 2. paRT but /rt/ can't take first place why?
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Why "admit" with T but "admissible" with SS?

I just noticed that when the suffix -ible is added to "admit", it becomes "admissible" rather than "admittible". There are few other examples: "omit" = "...
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1 vote
2 answers
329 views

What's the consonant in the word "you"?

Some dictionaries say the IPA of the word "you" is "yu", some say the IPA is "ju", which is the correct consonant? "y" or "j"? Dictionary.com says it'...
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1 vote
1 answer
441 views

Does the word "discharge" sound more like /dɪstʃɑːʳdʒ/ or /dɪsdʒɑːʳdʒ/?

Does the word discharge sound more like /dɪstʃɑːʳdʒ/ or /dɪsdʒɑːʳdʒ/? How about exchange or disproportion? Do they sound more like /ɪkstʃeɪndʒ/ or /ɪksdʒeɪndʒ/? /dɪsprəpɔːʳʃən/ or /dɪsbrəpɔːʳʃən/? I ...
Stats Cruncher's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
2k views

How to pronounce "changed"?

When pronouncing the word changed, how to do that? It is giving me a hard time because of the G and D part. It is so difficult to pronounce. Can I skip the G and pronounce chaned or what is the ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
90 views

General spelling rule: no double (repeated) consonant after another consonant?

Is it correct to tell ESL students that there aren't any words in English that have a double repeated consonant after another consonant? For example: Sttrugle Inffection dispposal Thanks!
Gottano's user avatar
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Is / l / in “whole” dark or clear?

Is / l / in “whole” dark or clear? I know that a clear ( or palatalised ) / l / is in a prevocalic position; nonetheless, I also know that the dark / l / ( or velarised ) is usually at the end of ...
M.Ionut's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
212 views

Do English language consonants soften?

Bonk's English course book states that they didn't at all. Where could someone obtain this necessary knowledge? Do you soften the first letter of DID rather than first of DO?
FAQ's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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How to pronounce unaspirated stop sound properly? Such as the /t/ in " let me", is it just/lɛ/ /mi/?

I'm not a native speaker, and I feel difficult to pronounce unaspirated stop sound properly, such as the /t/ in "let me". I found some learning materials on internet, but they are not sophisticated ...
Chunguang Lai's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
61 views

Final consonants: ways of compensating for the lack of voicing in initial and final position. [closed]

this question (Final consonants: ways of compensating for the lack of voicing in initial and final position.) is part of my exam but I fully don´t understand what it means. Please can someone tell ...
user72436's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
3k views

Can I make an unaspirated /t/ sound in the words like "best", "chest", "belt" etc. in American English?

As far as I know, if there is a vowel before the final /t/ or if there is the letter /n/ before the final /t/, we can make an unaspirated /t/ sound in American English. For example: "hot", "cut", "...
Fire and Ice's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
3k views

Are there words with the letter C in which its pronounced like Z?

Are there words in English with the letter C in which it's really pronounced as Z? By googling I found an old book which counts these words as in which letter C sounds like Z: suffice, discern, ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
251 views

Is letter Y in "Guyana" a vowel or a consonant?

Despite not being perfect, I do have some basic knowledge about consonants and vowels. From textbooks and internet, I know that, for example, C, Q and X are always consonants; A, E, I, O, U are always ...
Alexander's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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'an' or 'a' before the word 'user'? [duplicate]

We learn in English grammar class to use 'a' before words starting with consonants and 'an' before words starting with vowels. Since for the word 'user' which starts with a vowel, are we supposed to ...
Albus Dumbledore's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
262 views

Where to find X-ray videos of the vocal track for all the English vowels? [closed]

I've found this web page that makes a convincing case for teaching/studying the cardinal vowel quadrilateral in language learning. Apparently it is taught to improve the accent to actors, and in some ...
rraallvv's user avatar
  • 423
3 votes
3 answers
846 views

Does English language have a voiceless alveolar sibilant affricate sound [t͡s]?

This affricate is not present in consonant tables for English language found in my textbooks. I do not trust them too much, because they omit some other English sounds too. I wonder mainly about ...
Alexander's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
137 views

The TH sound seems to be silent just after the S sound

When enjoying this beautiful song, I can't help but ask a question just like why the TH sound of that seems silent when used after the S sound. In my brain, the sound formed itself "recklessat" just ...
Kris's user avatar
  • 117
16 votes
4 answers
12k views

Are English consonant sounds [p], [t], [k] aspirated before another consonant?

Most sources which I encountered say that English consonants [p], [t], [k] are aspirated before a vowel but not after [s], and become unaspirated after [s]. Canonical example: [p] is strongly ...
Alexander's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
84 views

Does an (optionally) parenthesised word influence choice of article “a” vs “an”, or ðə vs ðiː?

The title sentence could be rendered in two ways: the one above, or Does a (optionally) parenthesised word... This might be more appropriate since the "optionally" has a kind of “removable” ...
leftaroundabout's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
462 views

Pronunciation of "met her" in American English

According to what I have been taught about American English: Consonant /t/ becomes flap between vowels (when not being onset of stressed syllable) Consonant /h/ becomes silent (when not [same as ...
broccoli forest's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
428 views

Should the last letter 'd' pronounced in word 'independent'?

I've got to know that the 'T' sound in American English has various pronunciation rules. For example, flap T. And also one of the rule is when T sound followed by an 'n' sound or 'ən' sound, the 'T' ...
Henry Wang's user avatar
  • 1,891
3 votes
2 answers
735 views

Does "shore" require the "r" sound in the pronunciation (UK pronunciation)?

In the Cambridge Dictionary I see the pronunciation of the word shore is represented by /ʃɔːr/. In the WordReference dictionary it is instead pronounced as /ʃɔː/. The "r" sound is silent in the last ...
user8469759's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
180 views

Double consonant: when should I use them?

I would like to know a clear rule about when should I use double consonant. For example: intelligent (yes), little (yes), collapse (yes), elegant (no). Not just about double l, but in general, is ...
ivanleoncz's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
73k views

Use of "an" for a word not starting with a vowel [duplicate]

I've encountered this quite a few times now. I'm aware that usually words, starting with a vowel require an "an", words not starting with a vowel are preceded by an "a". Sometimes words start with a ...
boolean.is.null's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
636 views

What does Ann Margret say, "Oh, dream maker" or "Old dream maker" in the song "Moon River"?

The song "Moon River" has been sung by many singers. I particularly like Ann Margret's version. There are several videos on YouTube with this version; one of them is at this link. You can easily find ...
Makoto Kato's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
129 views

AmEng: Is the T tapped (flap) in the compound noun heart attack?

Is the T tapped (flap) in the compound noun: heart attack? I'm talking about the T in the word "heart".
Zoltan King's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
697 views

Do Americans remove the "t" in "wanted"?

When you pronounce the phrase "I got a message you wanted to see me", is the "t" usually deleted in the word "wanted"? Thank you.
Zoltan King's user avatar
34 votes
11 answers
11k views

Do native speakers distinguish well the pronunciations of "L" and "R"?

Sometimes I have a problem in distinguishing "L" and "R" in spoken English. I wonder if native speakers distinguish well the pronunciations of "L" and "R". For example, how about "leave" and "reave" ...
Makoto Kato's user avatar
  • 2,026
1 vote
1 answer
443 views

Aspirated T in unstressed syllable

I read that p, t, and k are aspirated at the beginning of words, but are they aspirated in an unstressed syllable? For example, the first syllable in the word "today" is unstressed.
Zoltan King's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

Question about assimilation

Good day [ɡʊd deɪ] and at time [ət taɪm] - is it a partial assimilation(loss of plossion), or maybe complete assimilation like in horse-shoe? And what about don’t you ? I know there's a form doncha ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
156 views

Modifications of consonants

Could you help me to figure out one thing? My task is to comment on the modifications of consonants by the neighbouring sounds(assimilation,ellision). But there are some words in the task where I don'...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
718 views

Thoracic: Why are two differing types of c pronunciations used?

In the English language, the word thoracic is pronounced as "thorasik." (I know that's not the proper way to show pronunciation, but I'm interested (for this question) in the two c's. Why would it ...
CGCampbell's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
46 views

a-an consonant starting words [duplicate]

Is there some special rule regarding articles for words starting with two consonants? I was taught to use a when a word starts with consonant (or an otherwise). I just wrote "a mPOS device" but MS ...
Leos Literak's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
991 views

do you release the air from nose when say cotton?

I am trying to learn how to pronounce words like cotton, written, mountain. in general, the t, then n (between them will not be pronounced) so i learned that i have to cut the t. in other words, make ...
Marco Dinatsoli's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
204 views

Why connection is "pronounced" as C while "concert" is pronounced as K [duplicate]

I was wondering why connection is pronounced with C while concert is pronounced with K.
Shantanu Gupta's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
2k views

Why do Americans pronounce the word "shorter" differently from the British?

While I am learning the American pronunciation, I find that the Americans pronounce the word "shorter" quite differently from the British. Specifically, the "t" sound in the word ...
NeverGiveUp1989's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
2k views

Is there a rule to know when to pronounce letter c as a "soft c" (s) or "hard c" (k)?

Is there a rule that would help me to learn when to pronounce the letter c as an "s" sound or a "k" sound? For example: - cat (kat) - center (sinter) Are there any rules, or is it all memorization?...
user4812's user avatar