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Questions tagged [consonants]

This tag is for questions about the pronunciation and orthographic representation of consonants.

3
votes
1answer
49 views

How to pronounce unaspirated stop sound properly? Such as the /t/ in “ let me”, is it just/lɛ/ /mi/?

I'm not a native speaker, and I feel difficult to pronounce unaspirated stop sound properly, such as the /t/ in "let me". I found some learning materials on internet, but they are not sophisticated ...
2
votes
0answers
38 views

Final consonants: ways of compensating for the lack of voicing in initial and final position. [closed]

this question (Final consonants: ways of compensating for the lack of voicing in initial and final position.) is part of my exam but I fully don´t understand what it means. Please can someone tell ...
2
votes
2answers
397 views

Can I make an unaspirated /t/ sound in the words like “best”, “chest”, “belt” etc. in American English?

As far as I know, if there is a vowel before the final /t/ or if there is the letter /n/ before the final /t/, we can make an unaspirated /t/ sound in American English. For example: "hot", "cut", "...
0
votes
2answers
92 views

Is letter Y in “Guyana” a vowel or a consonant?

Despite not being perfect, I do have some basic knowledge about consonants and vowels. From textbooks and internet, I know that, for example, C, Q and X are always consonants; A, E, I, O, U are always ...
2
votes
1answer
372 views

'an' or 'a' before the word 'user'? [duplicate]

We learn in English grammar class to use 'a' before words starting with consonants and 'an' before words starting with vowels. Since for the word 'user' which starts with a vowel, are we supposed to ...
2
votes
0answers
141 views

Where to find X-ray videos of the vocal track for all the English vowels? [closed]

I've found this web page that makes a convincing case for teaching/studying the cardinal vowel quadrilateral in language learning. Apparently it is taught to improve the accent to actors, and in some ...
4
votes
2answers
174 views

Does English language have a voiceless alveolar sibilant affricate sound [t͡s]?

This affricate is not present in consonant tables for English language found in my textbooks. I do not trust them too much, because they omit some other English sounds too. I wonder mainly about ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

About the pronunciation: the TH sound seems to be silent just after the S sound

When enjoying this beautiful song, I can't help but ask a question just like why the TH sound of that seems silent when used after the S sound. In my brain, the sound formed itself "recklessat" just ...
16
votes
4answers
4k views

Are English consonant sounds [p], [t], [k] aspirated before another consonant?

Most sources which I encountered say that English consonants [p], [t], [k] are aspirated before a vowel but not after [s], and become unaspirated after [s]. Canonical example: [p] is strongly ...
3
votes
2answers
62 views

Does an (optionally) parenthesised word influence choice of article “a” vs “an”, or ðə vs ðiː?

The title sentence could be rendered in two ways: the one above, or Does a (optionally) parenthesised word... This might be more appropriate since the "optionally" has a kind of “removable” ...
0
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1answer
146 views

Pronunciation of “met her” in American English

According to what I have been taught about American English: Consonant /t/ becomes flap between vowels (when not being onset of stressed syllable) Consonant /h/ becomes silent (when not [same as ...
3
votes
2answers
312 views

Does “shore” require the “r” sound in the pronunciation (UK pronunciation)?

In the Cambridge Dictionary I see the pronunciation of the word shore is represented by /ʃɔːr/. In the WordReference dictionary it is instead pronounced as /ʃɔː/. The "r" sound is silent in the last ...
3
votes
2answers
140 views

Double consonant: when should I use them?

I would like to know a clear rule about when should I use double consonant. For example: intelligent (yes), little (yes), collapse (yes), elegant (no). Not just about double l, but in general, is ...
1
vote
1answer
35k views

Use of “an” for a word not starting with a vowel [duplicate]

I've encountered this quite a few times now. I'm aware that usually words, starting with a vowel require an "an", words not starting with a vowel are preceded by an "a". Sometimes words start with a ...
1
vote
1answer
334 views

What does Ann Margret say, “Oh, dream maker” or “Old dream maker” in the song “Moon River”?

The song "Moon River" has been sung by many singers. I particularly like Ann Margret's version. There are several videos on YouTube with this version; one of them is at this link. You can easily find ...
4
votes
1answer
86 views

AmEng: Is the T tapped (flap) in the compound noun heart attack?

Is the T tapped (flap) in the compound noun: heart attack? I'm talking about the T in the word "heart".
3
votes
2answers
256 views

Do Americans remove the “t” in “wanted”?

When you pronounce the phrase "I got a message you wanted to see me", is the "t" usually deleted in the word "wanted"? Thank you.
1
vote
1answer
251 views

Aspirated T in unstressed syllable

I read that p, t, and k are aspirated at the beginning of words, but are they aspirated in an unstressed syllable? For example, the first syllable in the word "today" is unstressed.
4
votes
1answer
594 views

Question about assimilation

Good day [ɡʊd deɪ] and at time [ət taɪm] - is it a partial assimilation(loss of plossion), or maybe complete assimilation like in horse-shoe? And what about don’t you ? I know there's a form doncha ...
4
votes
2answers
131 views

Modifications of consonants

Could you help me to figure out one thing? My task is to comment on the modifications of consonants by the neighbouring sounds(assimilation,ellision). But there are some words in the task where I don'...
3
votes
2answers
480 views

Thoracic: Why are two differing types of c pronunciations used?

In the English language, the word thoracic is pronounced as "thorasik." (I know that's not the proper way to show pronunciation, but I'm interested (for this question) in the two c's. Why would it ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

a-an consonant starting words [duplicate]

Is there some special rule regarding articles for words starting with two consonants? I was taught to use a when a word starts with consonant (or an otherwise). I just wrote "a mPOS device" but MS ...
0
votes
1answer
144 views

Why connection is “pronounced” as C while “concert” is pronounced as K [duplicate]

I was wondering why connection is pronounced with C while concert is pronounced with K.
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is there a rule to know when to pronounce letter c as a “soft c” (s) or “hard c” (k)?

Is there a rule that would help me to learn when to pronounce the letter c as an "s" sound or a "k" sound? For example: - cat (kat) - center (sinter) Are there any rules, or is it all memorization?...
2
votes
2answers
939 views

how to pronounce combined consonants

My mother tongue, Korean, makes a syllable with vowels. So it’s very hard to pronounce or hear the sounds combined consonants in a row. Would you explain how to make the ‘fts’ sound in tufts, minutely?...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

How many consonant and vowel combination types are there in English? [closed]

I'm an ESL learner and I'm not so good at English yet. I want to find official documents, links, guides, etc. which contain rules about consonants and vowels blending together. Which rules decide ...