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Questions tagged [contractions]

A contraction of a word is made by omitting certain letters or syllables and bringing together the first and last letters or elements.

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How do I write "Tess is not here" abbreviated?

Being Swedish I am not sure about this: I want to write "Tess is not here" abbreviated. Do I write "Tess's not here" or "Tess' not here"?
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2 votes
1 answer
43 views

Using the short form of the verb 'to be' in continuous aspect

I'm wondering if it is okay to use a short form of "to be" after nouns, as in the sentences: "The women 're working", "The birds're singing".
Iza Lev's user avatar
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1 answer
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can ' what is' be shortened in 'what is it'?

What's it? should be 'What is it?' we don't shorten "what is" in a case like this. only if it is not followed by a continuing phrase. Is the claim from a chat with a stranger true? What's ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 3,841
2 votes
2 answers
104 views

contractions: "I have been" vs "I have a"

I have been waiting here a) I've been waiting here I have a car a) I've a car When it's comes to the first one the abbreviation is corrrect but what about the second one? It seems to be odd but what'...
train bee 282's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

<he's vs he is> at the end of a clause

He used to be much better off than he's now. Is the contraction "he's" correct here? Or should it be: He used to be much better off than he is now. The reason why I ask is that I was ...
ForOU's user avatar
  • 1,677
0 votes
2 answers
58 views

condescension and can

We can talk about modal auxiliary verbs in terms of such logical notions as ‘permission’ and ‘necessity’ but, this done, we still have to consider ways in which these notions become remoulded by the ...
gonju yi's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
1 answer
63 views

Is contracting "I have not been" as "I've not been" idiomatic?

Is it idiomatic to contract I have not as I've not instead of I haven't in the present perfect? For example: I have not been to Canada. As I've not been to Canada. He has not ridden a camel. As He's ...
Pumpkin cake's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
187 views

She is as intelligent as I or as I'm [closed]

Let's look at the following sentences. He is better than I'm.(Than is used as Conjunction) =>He is better than I. =>He is better than me.(Than is used as preposition). We've dropped 'am ' from ...
Sahil Laskar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
32 views

Can I use "ain't" in this context?

I have this original sentence: I have never been to that supermarket across the street. I would like to add the informal term "ain't". How do I integrate it in? I ain't never been to that ...
U13-Forward's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
614 views

Why is this usage of "I've to work" so awkward?

I'm a native speaker but I saw a sentence on an internet post that started If I've to work without (some resource) ... I had to read it a couple times before I read it as If I have to work without ...
Dean MacGregor's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
526 views

How can you contract 'I could'?

Is it possible to contract 'I could'? Can 'I'd' be used for 'I could' like for 'I would'? Or, if 'I could' can't be contracted to 'I'd', can it be to 'I'c'd' (but it should be "I c'd" and ...
The Amateur Coder's user avatar
9 votes
3 answers
2k views

Are some contractions more OK than others depending on formality of the text in English?

As a general rule of thumb, the more formal a text is, the more one should avoid using contractions – and vice versa. But if a certain text is informal enough to allow contractions, is it better to be ...
Helen's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
31 views

Word count with contraction such as Let's [closed]

In various situations it is desired to count the number of words in a statement. For example, in dictation practice for learning to type. So in a phrase such as "Let's go Brandon" how would ...
BillOnne's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
42 views

what is the full phrase of the contraction zeal's

I saw the following below while I was playing the game name Chrono Trigger Zeal's advances stem from a new energy source. What is the full phrase of the contraction word Zeal's in the following?
tcvduc's user avatar
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-2 votes
1 answer
43 views

"There's," is only for singular subjects [closed]

"There's," seems a lazy way of saying, "There're," when the object is plural. In recent times, two words, February and instrument, have kept their spelling, but newly are allowed ...
George Tally's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
69 views

isn't going anywhere vs. [pronoun]'s not going anywhere

he's not going anywhere has 49,600 results. he isn't going anywhere has 5,650 results. (I performed a similar search in a private library, and the difference was more or less the same.) Is the second ...
wyc's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
40 views

Is it stylistically wrong to use only "I'm" and "It's" in their contracted forms in a text in which there are no other contracted forms? [closed]

I have written a number of texts. They are not formal texts, but are aimed for language learners. In all of these texts, I have used "I'm" and "It's" while all the other forms such ...
Mohsen Sadi's user avatar
  • 1,168
-1 votes
1 answer
724 views

What does whatcha mean?

In casual conversations, does whatcha mean any one of the following three options depending on contexts? = what are you ▶ Whatcha gonna do? = what have you ▶ Whatcha got? = What do you ▶ Whatcha wanna ...
Stephen's user avatar
  • 1,565
5 votes
4 answers
2k views

Have or 've? When can we not contract "have"?

When is it not possible to use the contracted form of have? Can I contract have in this sentence? My parents have just arrived
Simona T's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
841 views

Which is correct and why? "How can I not...?" or "How can't I...?"

How can I not know this? How can't I know this? Which one of the two sentences is correct? Or maybe they are both correct, but different in meaning.
Henry Wang's user avatar
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0 answers
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Why does "Don't you Dare" equal "Do not you dare"?

"Don't you dare" makes grammatical sense but why does "Do not you dare" not make grammatical sense?
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0 votes
2 answers
33 views

Is the following "what's" contraction similar to these other cases?

What's he doing? Is this "what's" contraction the same as: What's his last name? What's the last time he showered? Why or why not? I ask because the first sentence sounds a little ...
wyc's user avatar
  • 7,175
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

Aren’t I? vs. Am I not?

I am a good man, aren’t I? I am a good man, am I not? The first sentence is often used. According to grammar books, the second sentence is also correct, but it is rarely used. Can native speakers ...
Delfino's user avatar
  • 535
-1 votes
1 answer
57 views

Let's be printed the matter

Let's be printed the matter. This sentence is wrong and it sounds odd. But grammatically what is the error in this sentence? Is there any specific format for Let's? I have read on a website that &...
jbn's user avatar
  • 299
1 vote
1 answer
252 views

Is it common to use contractions with names

Are contractions commonly used with names in informal speech? for example Bob'll be here soon Bill'll be here too Mary'd find your joke amusing And also, I find some contractions difficult to ...
adik's user avatar
  • 107
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

The preference for "may be" ot "maybe" after the conjuction "― and"

My dad turned around and stared at us, his fear confirming that something wasn't right ― and maybe even very wrong. One student struggles to understand the sentence especially in a bold part. - and (...
kimi Tanaka's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
2k views

What does “gonna go” mean precisely? Is it the same as “going to go”?

Recently, I have come across the phrase "gonna go". What is the difference between all these sentences? I am gonna go get some ice cream. I am going to go get some ice cream. I am going to ...
Aarsh's user avatar
  • 57
0 votes
3 answers
433 views

When can you use a contraction, and when can you not? What are some examples of longer contractions?

For example is but I don't see how's that relevant grammatical? As for longer contractions, many of the ones that I've found on the internet don't seem to be legitimate. For example: mustn't've ...
Alumi's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
78 views

Should I use "am" or "I'm" after already saying "I'm" in a sentence?

For example, "I'm looking forward to attending, and am excited to join" vs. "I'm looking forward to attending, and I'm excited to join."
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0 votes
1 answer
76 views

Does 'I'm pregnant with nobody' have a contradiction?

Does 'I'm pregnant with nobody' make sense? I try to express I have no baby growing in the uterus.
brooke's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
2k views

Is "shouldn't it" equivalent to "should it not" in American English?

I have noticed that some Americans write "shouldn't it" in sentences. For example: Why is the dog outside, shouldn't it be inside? Is this correct grammar in American English? Because I ...
Lars Kakavandi-Nielsen's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
363 views

What does the question imply?

What does Ron's question sound like it implies? A or B? “Wait, you were busy and were going to reply?” A: "Wait, you were going to reply after all? I thought you for sure missed my message” B: &...
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1 vote
1 answer
2k views

"I was thinking you might’ve missed my message"

I have a question regarding the use of “might’ve” Here I was thinking you missed my message. vs Here I was thinking you might’ve missed my message. Would there have been any difference between using “...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

Contractions on a negative sentence in present

More specifically I'm talking about the present simple and continuous, for example I know you can answer a yes/no question whose answer is negative like this: Is he in college? No, he isn't. Are ...
DZV31's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
102 views

Short forms of "be" and "have"

Are the short forms of verbs "To be" and "To have" common in written English? For example "She has a baby" is probably more common than "She's a baby" in both ...
Antonia A 's user avatar
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30 votes
2 answers
5k views

Why can't I contract "it has" sometimes?

Why can we contract "it has" to "it's" in some sentences but not others? For example: Why is this correct It's been moved (It has been moved) this incorrect It's four legs (It ...
Tom Brown's user avatar
  • 411
0 votes
2 answers
987 views

Can I use had in sentence for future time? For example "We'd be fee." Is this a simple future or simple past?

Can I use had in sentence for future time? For example We'd be free. Is this a simple future or simple past?
Ketul's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
192 views

Using 's when saying something 'is'

I've just said to a friend "That cloud's looking very dark". And apparently that's not correct. He said "it's" is allowed as an abbreviation but "cloud's" is never "...
ThePerplexedOne's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
52 views

Correct contraction with to be (not)

If I say: You are not Julie, what is the correct contraction? You're not Julie You aren't Julie
max's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
111 views

Use contractions with common nouns

Although there you can find the below example on the website of Cambridge, I had a feedback from an English teacher telling me that the two contractions in bold in the second sentence are wrong. What ...
Costa's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
4k views

Can I use apostrophe s to shorten "is"?

For example, I'd say: The interview's on Monday. Is that grammatically acceptable?
Lester Nubla's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
96 views

Can you contract WILL with nouns in informal writing / speaking?

I'm considering writing the following in an email to a friend. I'm sure the exam'll be easy. But it just sounds wrong to me, even in an informal setting....
Gottano's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
113 views

Weak and strong "You're"

Dictionaries list two pronunciations for you're, a weak pronunciation and a strong pronunciation. In which situations do we use the strong version of you're /jɔːr/, and in which situations do we use ...
Houman's user avatar
  • 300
0 votes
0 answers
134 views

Contracted form of Present Continuous with nouns ending with -s

How do we form the contracted form of Present Continuous with nouns ending with -s, for example: Thomas is playing football next Sunday. Can we write Thomas' playing football next Sunday. How does ...
highvit's user avatar
  • 87
3 votes
2 answers
3k views

Why do we add an apostrophe to "gon'"?

English is not my native language, and I keep trying every day to develop my skills in it but I saw a new word of gon' instead of gone. And I keep wondering: why do we add an apostrophe to it? ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
41 views

Is 'yet's' "yet is" in "the fact that they haven't caught him yet's one hell of an achievement"

"Hard to help a boy who's vanished off the face of the earth," said Dirk. "Listen, the fact that they haven't caught him yet's one hell of an achievement," said Ted. "I'd take tips from him ...
dan's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
369 views

“I’ve a cold” vs “I have a cold”—are both correct?

Would the sentence “I’ve a cold” be correct? I’m wondering if contractions can always be used in place of the original words.
Patrick's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
101 views

Is it mandatory to use contractions in tag questions and the like?

Example 1: The weather is hot, isn't it? vs.: The weather is hot, is it not? Example 2: Aren't you going to study tonight? vs.: Are you not going to study tonight? Apart from ...
Djaouad's user avatar
  • 101
1 vote
1 answer
315 views

Is contraction obligatory in negative interrogative sentences?

I know that a verb and "not" are usually contracted when together in a negative interrogative sentence. Example: Aren't they lovely? Is it grammatically wrong to avoid the contraction? Example: ...
Alan Evangelista's user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
71 views

Spelling for the spoken contraction of "on the" [closed]

When "on the" is spoken very fast they are connected, contracted, forming a connected-speech. Even knowing that this contraction doesn't exist in English, how could it be written to reflect the ...
Luciano's user avatar
  • 207