Questions tagged [contractions]

A contraction of a word is made by omitting certain letters or syllables and bringing together the first and last letters or elements.

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1answer
28 views

Spelling for the spoken contraction of “on the”

When "on the" is spoken very fast they are connected, contracted, forming a connected-speech. Even knowing that this contraction doesn't exist in English, how could it be written to reflect the ...
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2answers
33 views

Amy has had many different jobs : contraction

Can we contract the sentence Amy has had many different jobs to this one? Amy's had many different jobs
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1answer
179 views

When “he's gone” means “he's dead”, is it a contraction of “he is” or “he has”?

I have seen this a lot in movies. When a man dies, another person goes near him, feels his pulse, and then says in a sad voice: "He's gone". Is this a contraction of "he is gone", or "he has gone"? ...
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1answer
49 views

Are contractions discouraged in formal writing?

I remember reading something long ago that says people should avoid contractions in formal writing. I wonder whether that is true. And by formal writing, I mean specifically the four types: (1) ...
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0answers
14 views

There's lots of flavors out there [duplicate]

This comes courtesy of one of the episodes of Friends (Youtube): There's lots of flavors out there. Shouldn't 're be used here in lieu of 's?
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2answers
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Can one use a contraction in a question?

a) Why are you trying so hard? b) Why you're trying so hard? Is you're (b) an acceptable contraction form of are you (a) when I want to keep the sentence in a question form? Is there another ...
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1answer
37 views

Are there contractions for past tense of lexical verbs? (was and were)

For present tense (declarative) of lexical verbs (to be) we have contractions for all pronouns: (I am = I’m. You are = you’re. He is = he’s. She is = she’s. It is = it’s. We are = we’re. They are =...
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2answers
44 views

When can we use short forms of be?

It’s clear that we can say we’re, they’re, he’s, she’s. However, when the subjects are not subject pronouns, can we use short forms of be? For example, can we say: My dad’s washing the car. ...
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1answer
291 views

Double contractions

Natives, what's the PDE grammar around double contractions like "couldn't've", "mustn't've" "shouldn't've" or "needn't've"? Are they in use in formal or informal English and in spoken or written ...
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4answers
43 views

Are “We've all” and “we all have” the same?

i had been reading a paper but i haven't understood a paragraph. Can you help me? paragraph as follows "We've all left meetings feelings good about what we discussed only to later wonder why so ...
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1answer
25 views

Can you use contacted forms like “ 've ” without joining them to a noun/pronoun?

Is a sentence like this fine, maybe in spoken English: "I love these films and books, 've seen and read them multiple times". Do you have to add a noun, or at least use the full form "have"?
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1answer
50 views

Can the expanded form of {don't/doesn't} be used as 'correct English'?

I know it may not be very common, but I need to use it in its expanded form (i.e., do not and does not) for a formatting issue. For example: X does not see any logic in your reasoning. X: is ...
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2answers
4k views

Are double contractions formal? Eg: “couldn't've” for “could not have”

Are double contractions, such as following, formal (ie allowed in formal documents/papers)? it'll've for "it shall have" or "it will have" mightn't've for "might not have" How about multiple ...
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1answer
2k views

“here's it” versus “here it's”

Which is correct? Weird is hard to spell. Here's it spelled correctly: weird. or Weird is hard to spell. Here it's spelled correctly: weird. In conversation, both seem acceptable, but on paper ...
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2answers
328 views

What is the issue about “You are welcome” and “You're welcome”?

Recently, I came across a comment where a native English speaker stated that it is not "you are welcome" but "you're welcome". It was a side-comment as the original post wasn't about their difference; ...
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1answer
39 views

What tense is this: “Why'd you make him live all those years alone?”

In the movie "Something big" with Dean Martin, Mr. Baker asks colonel's wife: "Why'd you make him live all those years alone?" What tense is that? Grammary suggest me: Why'd you made him live all ...
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3answers
7k views

“This's” instead of “this is”

Is it popular to contract "this is" to "this's"? Or is it better to keep the full form? This's where we'll go tomorrow. Or This is where we'll go tomorrow.
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4answers
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Can we say or write : “No, it'sn't”?

I know we can answer either : No, it's not No, it isn't But is it accepted and understandable to write : No, it'sn't What about saying it ?
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2answers
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Is “this is the man who stolen my car” grammatically correct?

I had this in my last english exam and I had a to choose between 4 answers "this is the man (who-whose-who's-which) stolen my car" "who" is the only answer which makes sense to me although I think ...
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2answers
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The meaning of “I'd 'a' plum got him,”

Inside, Buckley found Bud Dawson utterly ignoring a bullet wound in his shoulder, while he feelingly wept at having to explain why he failed to drop the "blamed masquerooter," who shot him. At the ...
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2answers
141 views

Are contractions and/or slang used in English exams and tests? [closed]

Are all those correct uses in English or is it just for explaining and not correct for writing on tests or exams? Would it sound more fluent to write Ex, Y'all, I'll, They're. instead of ...
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3answers
16k views

Will you not, or Will not (won't) you?

When asking someone questions about the future, would you ask Will you not? or Will not (won't) you? For example, of    1. Will you not go to school today?    2. Will ...
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0answers
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What is the full form of 'won't you?' [duplicate]

In an example sentence like: 'Sit down, won't you?' What is the full form of that sentence without contraction? Is it 'Sit down, will you not?' cause we can't say 'Sit down, will not you?'
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4answers
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What do 'er and patch 'er up mean?

What does the contraction 'er and the phrasal verb patch 'er up mean in the following text: This section will cover a lot of ground and your brain may meltdown a few times, but don’t worry, that’s ...
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1answer
43 views

Can we write was and were in the form of contraction?

Can we write for example "We were waiting for you" in this way "We're waiting for you"? and if we can how to differentiate between the past and present in these sentences?
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1answer
56 views

Is this usage of contraction correct and if so is it natural?

I've wrote the following to a friend. A consequence of my brain tumor was that my sense of taste's almost completely gone today. I can't help feeling that I should have written "...sense of taste ...
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2answers
97k views

“You are” vs. “you're” — what is the difference between them?

“You are” vs. “you're” — what is the difference between them? I get confused between the two a lot. I want to understand how to use them appropriately, because I hate making mistakes.
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1answer
148 views

How does one pronounce I'd've?

I think it's the first time I've ever seen a double contraction like this: "That’s, let’s be optimistic, a 30 to 50 mile radius at least in which we are the only two people left. I can’t even ...
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2answers
853 views

Using contractions correctly in Grammar like the word “weren't” when asking a question

Are the two example questions correct or is there a rule that applies when using and not using contraction words? "weren't you able to log into your online account?" "were not you able to log into ...
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3answers
1k views

We got a PM who’s [sic] 93 years old

while @elmoehussaini posted: “We got a PM who’s [sic] 93 years old. We got a Team of Eminent Persons to repair the economy who are of 60 years old and above. I guess the “I’m too old for this s***” is ...
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1answer
177 views

How do I use contraction in sentences like 'My brother and I have got a lot of toys'?

My question is as follows: is it grammatically correct - I would like to be referred to reliable sources - to contract such like subjects and the main or auxiliary have: My brother and I have got a ...
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2answers
1k views

How to choose a proper contraction “it's not” versus “it isn't”?

I'm aware that both it's not and it isn't are contractions of the same phrase, it is not. Till today, I was convinced that choosing them depends on desired emphasis. This way, choosing it's not ...
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2answers
50 views

He's worried himself sick about his daughter

He's worried himself sick about his daughter. In this sentence, Is either He's [He is] or [He has] ?
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2answers
2k views

Use of “shan't” in speech

Let's assume that someone says, "I shall do this" to me. As a response or a teasing way, Can I use, "You shan't..!" ? Well, I used this once - when a friend of mine replied: "Huh?" Is it OK to use "...
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2answers
3k views

“mightn't have” and “might not have”

In American English, are "mightn't have" and "might not have" both often used in speaking and writing? How about "couldn't have" and "could not have"? How about in British English? Thanks!
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1answer
70 views

Want To vs Wanna

What is the difference between both? When should I use Want to and when should I use Wanna? I was wondering if there is the correct way - gramatically speaking - depending on the situation, or if ...
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3answers
52 views

“Do you like movies, do not you?” Correct?

In writing, contraction should be avoided, right? However, I feel strange to see "do not you" instead of "don't you". I wonder if native speakers use "do not you" in writing instead of using "don't ...
2
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1answer
186 views

Agreed or agree?

I often meet on Interntet forums the following exchange: A: (some proposition) B: Agreed. Why "agreed", not "agree"? Is it a contracted form of "have agreed" or the past simple? Is the form "...
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1answer
465 views

Think somebody + adjective

Is this sentence from a movie grammatical? I thought you overqualified. The construction "think someone adj." strikes me as odd. Explanations/examples?
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27k views

Can we use “there is” for plural nouns?

Is the following correct: There's a sofa, two armchairs, a TV and a big cage for our parrots. Or should we change it to: There's a sofa, there are two armchairs, there's a TV and a big cage ...
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4answers
19k views

There's vs There are

For example: There's two options here or There are two options here I hear a lot of people say the first line (or something similar), but isn't that incorrect? Isn't it plural and therefore ...
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1answer
19k views

Is there any short form of “am not”?

We use short forms for verb + not like isn't, aren't, hasn't, won't, wasn't etc. But I haven't seen any short form used for am+not. So, I want to know if any short form exists for am not. Note: In ...
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2answers
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where can I use aren't?

where I have to use aren't ? can I use "aren't" when I'm talking about clothes? example; " aren't this blouses a little expensive?" is it right?
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7answers
12k views

“Do never…” vs. “Do not ever…”

I am just arguing with my friend if the phrase "do never something" is totally wrong compared to the phrase "do not ever something". And is "never" a contraction of "not ever"? Is it okay using "Do" ...
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3answers
662 views

“needn't be answered” and “not needed to be answered”

Is there a difference or a grammatical mistake in this two sentences? All the questions needn't be answered All the questions are not needed to be answered
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2answers
284 views

Negative deduction

In grammar books, it is written that you can use "cannot" or "can't" for negative deduction like: 'Susy cannot stay at her mother's house because she is in hospital.' I know that this works for ...
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4answers
41k views

Is Let us = Let's?

Many times I heard these words interchangeably. I want to know if "Let's" and "Let us" are used for the same meaning. I think (for me): "Let us" is word used for requesting. Like Let us do something ...
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4answers
48k views

What is a plural of “To-Do”? “To-Dos” or “To-Does”?

Say I have a list of "To-Do" things. I want to mention them to someone, so I doubt on how to call it: 1. I have many "To-Dos" for today 2. I have many "To-Does" for today 3. I have many "To-Do'...
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3answers
2k views

In the expression “There's got to be some” what does the 's stand for?

I wrote: "Not at all." I kissed her slim curled lips. "There are very few things I want to do that doesn't include you." "There got to be some." A native speaker told me that I needed to ...
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1answer
333 views

“Is” instead of “are” with many

In spoken English I often hear a contraction of Why is used with many+plural noun. Is that acceptable informal language or should it be avoided? Why's there so many books on the table? instead of Why ...