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Am I expected to add more or further thoughts following indeed?

Is it proper to reply “Indeed!” to agree with someone on some opinion? Am I expected to add more or further thoughts following indeed? (I remember seeing such advice somewhere, and can't find it. But ...
Tim's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
36 views

Does "being in despair" imply more severity than being desperate?

Or, do the two words- depair and desperate convey the same feeling
megamonster68's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
505 views

- Dad, John doesn't want to go to school today! / - He shall!

How idiomatic is this dialogue? -- Dad, John doesn't want to go to school today! -- He shall! (whether he likes it or not, and I will make sure he does!)
user avatar
33 votes
8 answers
5k views

Does “you can go now” sound rude? Context provided in question

As an IT guy in a college, I was helping a professor with his phone problems. After I was done helping him, I told him “you can go now.” to end the interaction as I had another student waiting for my ...
mathdummies's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
42 views

When in the presence of multiple people, is it preferred to use people's first name when referring to them vs a pronoun?

I saw an interview with Russel Brand on Youtube where he notes that you should not refer to someone, who is present, using their pronoun but their actual name as that is good manners: https://www....
Hans's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
102 views

"Didn't she say something?" vs. "Didn't she say anything?"

I think the second statement has negative meanings maybe the speaker thought she didn't even say a single word. Or he/she hesitates between the person speaking or not(speaking), but it's more likely ...
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
56 views

Indirect interrogative sentence; is it acceptable "not" to use it in verbal conversations?

It can be just a learner's habit, but I frequently (mis)use direct interrogative forms when I'm actually supposed to use indirect forms. Part of the reason is that it sometimes sounds even more ...
Gwangmu Lee's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
86 views

Would my answer starting with "Ok" be impolite in this context?

I'm not a native English speaker. I've been texting with a main contractor (myself being subcontractor to his business), and these were the closing sentences of that conversation: Him: Ok cool, I can ...
b4Rni's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
29 views

A question on word stress

Video link:stress It seems that two stresses are put in the following words in the video and all of the main stress are on the second syllable because the pitch is higher and rises on the second one. ...
questionguy's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
57 views

Is it okay to use "because" at the end of a sentence in casual talks?

I'm reading a book written by a non-native speaker, in a paragraph it says something like this: A: Does the thought of two people of the same sex being attracted to each other make you uncomfortable? ...
AGamePlayer's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
528 views

How to ask someone to speed up a delayed task in a polite but solid way?

Consider you paying someone to do something for you at a specific time. But the person does not aim to reach the agreed time. What is the most professional way to ask him to adhere to the deadline? ...
Real Dreams's user avatar
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1 answer
47 views

must or have to

Pick just one: Tom can’t meet us because he must work. Tom can’t meet us because he has to work. I don’t believe either sentence is wrong, although the grammar book prescribes has to as the answer. ...
meepyer's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
2k views

"Your saying so don't make it so" meaning and grammar

What does "Your saying so don't make it so" in the following mean and is it grammatically valid? “You’re a coward and a pup. I’ll tell my big brother on you, and he can thrash you with his ...
Persian Brat's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
57 views

What is the meaning of this conversation?

This is from an anime called Yu Yu Hakusho. The girl is looking for something to drink. Girl: O.J.? It's better for you than a soda. Boy: That's fine, just pour it over ice and we can share with ...
kuwabara's user avatar
  • 1,430
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

This is the first time [closed]

I'm eating sushi. I tell my friends, who has invited me to eat it, This is the first time I've eaten sushi. I think this is wrong, because I'm still in the process of eating sushi. Using present ...
Stephen's user avatar
  • 1,555
0 votes
2 answers
7k views

How to reply to someone who introduced himself [closed]

How can I reply when I chat with a new person and he introduced himself and I want to show that I'm pleased to know him but in formal way
Jan 86's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
2k views

"I hope not" vs "I don't hope so"

'Is that woman American?' 'I think so. / I don't think so.' 'Do you think it's going to rain?' 'I hope so. / I hope not.' (not 'I don't hope so'). We can say "I don't think so"; but why ...
Sandip Kumar Mandal's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

How to describe to carry / move a kid

I wonder how a native would ask if someone could e.g. lift a baby out of a chair. First, I had the followings in mind (probably influenced by my own native language which is German): Could you get ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 103
1 vote
3 answers
223 views

Can you say "I had a several email conversations with her?"

I am trying to say I had talked to her through email several times. Which is the correct way of saying it? "I had several email conversations with her" or "conversation"? "I ...
Jun's user avatar
  • 11
2 votes
1 answer
935 views

what does "hitting the hour mark" mean?

what does "hitting the hour mark" mean in this conversation? a: How late is he? b: Hitting the hour mark. Hope there's nothing wrong.
try to be a programmer's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
841 views

Is it correct to say "Neither in mine"?

Two teachers are having conversation after visiting two different classrooms for lecture. They are saying that no student was there in their class (lecture)(I.e., No student attended their class). The ...
ramanujan's user avatar
  • 369
0 votes
1 answer
901 views

Is it correct to introduce myself on the phone by saying "I'm ..."

It's common that I always hear people on the phone would say Hello, This is Alex, is that Brenda? I wonder whether when I substitute "This is" with "I am" is correct. Also ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,002
0 votes
1 answer
558 views

Response to "Do you want to go to the cinema this weekend?"

My brother showed me this question from his English language test: Tom: Do you want to go to the cinema this weekend? Marry: (A) Yes, please. (B) OK, who are you going with? Both (A) and (B) sound ...
AndyD's user avatar
  • 97
1 vote
2 answers
3k views

Looking for an idiom meaning "you haven't changed"

Is there any idiom that means "you have not changed" that you could use in a conversation when you catch up with an old friend? Thank you.
Aud's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
2 answers
207 views

When nobody's on the counter in a shop, how do I say?

Would it be okay to say like below to a clerk near the counter? I would like to check out And if a cashier is on the counter but is doing something else, can I ask shortly like below? Are you open? ...
User 239837's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
39 views

How to say something new that has been known by someone at that exact time?

I think, the title unfolds my question. By the way, suppose I have a bag of apples and my friend says that he wants some. I have some sentences I have made to show and regarding to my question, I ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,002
0 votes
2 answers
548 views

Is it correct to say "What're you thinking about?"

My question is in the title above. I'm asking in informal way, I mean, can I use that in my daily conversation? This problem arose from learning languages app. The app said the correct answer is What ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,002
2 votes
1 answer
842 views

American equivalent of "no worries"?

From my understanding, "no worries" is one way to reply a polite apology. For example, it's something I can say when someone tells me that he or she would be late because of something ...
Chris Kuo's user avatar
  • 501
1 vote
2 answers
54 views

Natural ways to mean someone is stalling another

Example: If a woman is asked to get married and tries to get time to answer because she feels insecure but doesn't want to say it. I could tell she's stalling the man. But if I wanted to sound more ...
Vanessa Dias's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
267 views

(Come from/came from) + a country

When someone asks me, 'What country do you come from?' What should I answer? Suppose my country is India, is it 'I come from India' or 'I came from India'? If the answer is it depends on the context, ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,002
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

Is it OK to say "Thanks all the same" in this scenario?

Someone sent a message to me unexpectedly and I replied with a question mark, then he told me that he just made a mistake by selecting the wrong recipient. I read the message and found that it is very ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,293
2 votes
2 answers
196 views

How to politely end a phone call? [closed]

Sometimes when someone calls you، you need to end the call because there are no further things to talk about. As you have not initiated the call you expect the other party to end it. But sometimes ...
Real Dreams's user avatar
  • 2,170
0 votes
0 answers
3k views

How to ask someone for a picture taken with you?

Say, I meet a famous person and want to have a picture with them, what is the proper way to ask? Here's some of my own proposals: Could I take a picture of us? Could I take a picture with you? Are ...
charizard's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
84 views

There's no proof of what {you're saying/you said/you say} - which tense is correct?

What tense should I use in this case? Let's say that John and Paul are having a conversation. John claims to know something. Paul doesn't believe him. Which of the following answers is the most ...
Fra's user avatar
  • 1,653
0 votes
2 answers
66 views

Is "Should I...?" appropriate here?

Joseph puts a gun to the man's head, and looks to Angelo. Joseph: Should I shoot him? Joseph is basically asking: Do you want me to kill him? - Is that conveyed through "Should I shoot him?"...
user130175's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
36 views

"left everything to" or "left everything on"? [closed]

Wich of the two sentence is the right one? why? a) He never tried to mend things on his own and left everything to her b) He never tried to mend things on his own and left everything on her
Khushboo Kotwani's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
722 views

respond to "I hope I'm successful!"

One of my friends who has applied to a university told me "I hope I'm successful!". How can I respond to that? Is it correct to say "I'm sure you will be fine"? Any better ...
Marco's user avatar
  • 13
3 votes
2 answers
337 views

Does "right upstairs" mean "on the floor directly above"?

Background This line from Monk: Mr. Monk Makes a Friend (2007) motivates this question. Adrian Monk says this just outside his home to a friend of his. Come on, I live right upstairs. Just from this,...
niamulbengali's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
136 views

What about you or how about you

I was wondering, if we want to ask someone their answer on something in this kind of context below: A: How did you feel after graduating from high school? B: To be honest, I felt nothing. It was not ...
xoleoni97's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
12k views

Asking 'why are you asking this to me?'

Someone asks me a question in very formal conversation. And I want to know why he/she is asking me this question. Basically, I want to know the reason and purpose behind this question. How can I ask ...
Emile's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
274 views

Using "will" vs "would" to express (desire/willingness) in the present

If I'm in the present time and I'm trying to open the door using the key that doesn't want to go inside the lock. Should I say: 1- The key wouldn't go in. 2- They key won't go in.
Mohamed kz's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
51 views

Can we congratulate someone on a birthday or a new year?

What verb should I use instead of an ellipsis? Suppose I said "Happy birthday" to John. Then, I decided to tell my friend that I ... John with/on his birthday. The point is I want to ...
Bonrey's user avatar
  • 145
2 votes
2 answers
9k views

"I haven't heard" or "I didn't hear" while asking to repeat something

I wonder how I should reply if someone said something to me, and I haven't made out some words. I fluctuate between these two options: I'm sorry. I haven't heard what you've just said. I'm sorry. I ...
Bonrey's user avatar
  • 145
0 votes
0 answers
28 views

Using "opened up " as adjective

I heard the following in a movie "I want you to open up a little bit" Can I say instead "I want you to be opened up "
Mohamed kz's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
51 views

Is "it's been" correct here?

A: Rough day? B: No, it's been fine. A: OK. B: You? A: Fine. It's just been long. 1) This conversation is close to midnight, so the day is almost over. In that case is "it's been" natural? 2) ...
user116750's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
500 views

What do you say at the end of an E-Meetings? [closed]

Let's say, in our office, we used to take calls/meetings through Zoom & Webex. Usually, people say "Thank you. Thanks", at the end of the meeting. What else can we say in a polite and formal way? ...
Pluviophile's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
35 views

Can I not use the pronoun "I"?

Is it possible not to use the pronoun "I" when it occurs very often? For example, there are sentences: I will have breakfast now. Then I will go for a walk. Then I will go to sleep. Is it possible ...
alexrnov's user avatar
  • 113
0 votes
1 answer
55 views

Using present perfect confusion

Scenario 1: I just met my friend and he asked me to play soccer at night and I just told him, "I haven't played soccer in a long time." Scenario 2: We just started to play and I couldn't pass ...
Mohamed kz's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
60 views

If I say "Well you have yourself a good bank Holiday" and they reply "Yeah" and don't turn round. Are they rude?

If I say "Well you have yourself a good bank Holiday" and they reply "Yeah" and don't turn round. Are they being rude? A co-worker had their back to me. I said this as a way to say Bye. They ...
Punish the wicked's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
3k views

Will you greet your close friend 'Hi there'?

I thought 'Hi there' was only used to greet people who you didn't know their names, such as you write a complaint letter to customer service. So I feel a little bit awkward when I received messages ...
Elizabeth's user avatar
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