Questions tagged [conversation]

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10
votes
5answers
2k views

How to talk about the act of pressing the cancel button once the conversation on mobile is over?

At the end of the talk, people press cancel button to cut the call. What is that act called? If it were a land line phone, we could have said: She has put the phone down (?) Scene: My child was ...
15
votes
4answers
15k views

Can we say “Yes, I would” if someone asks “Would you mind buying me a drink?”

Here is in the textbook. If someone says Would you mind buying me a drink? to you, then you should answer: — Not at all (Yes, I can buy you a drink) — I’m sorry I can’t (No, I can't buy you a ...
2
votes
2answers
210 views

During colloquial conversation, what is the difference between calling people first name and last name?

During colloquial conversation, what is the difference between calling one first name or last name? I assume one if colloquial and one is more formal but not sure. Thank you very much!
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Where do you work?

I was visiting UK, and somebody asked me, "Where do you ....?", which I couldn't understand. The last word sounded like 'biased'? 'baist'? 'by at'? 'by ast'? something like that... And, he noticed ...
1
vote
1answer
31k views

How to reply to “Good day, sir”?

How to reply to Good day, sir in the beginning of the conversation as a greeting?
0
votes
2answers
916 views

How to elegantly show the direction in this specific situation?

Given a map like the following: Now your friend is standing at 1 end of the street 1 & he want to go to school. How can you elegantly show him the direction? Here is what I suggest but it is a ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

When starting a Skype conversation, what do people usually say at the very beginning? [closed]

So, I've contacted to my companion through Skype. What do people usually say first in this situation? "How are you"? or giving a name first and then "How are you"? Or are those two phrases are ...
2
votes
1answer
827 views

Formal conversation starting

Suppose I met someone to discuss some business topics, so the conversation is going to be quite formal. My companion started it with saying "How are you?". Is that acceptable to say "I'm great, hope ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Splitting “X verbed Y into Z” statements into question and answer

Are these responses grammatical? Speaker A: What did John force Mary to do? Speaker B: Her into buying the house. Speaker A: What did John talk to Jim? Speaker B: Him into believing the news....
2
votes
2answers
1k views

How to understand a expression of “ why don't you~”

I've learned that this expression is more like to persuade someone than asking the reasons I want to make sure of what i'm thinking When i say Why don't you take that class? Is more like ...
0
votes
1answer
930 views

Should the function be 'asking questions' or 'ask questions'?

for example: A: How old are you? B: I'm 20 years old What's the function of the previous mini-dialogue? Should the answer be: Function: asking and answering questions or Function: ask ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

What's a rule of thumb to decide if it's necessary to respond to a short “thank you” email in a formal context? (see example) [closed]

I wasn't sure about how to construct the question but with a conversation as example it'll be clearer: Chuck: Hi Joe, as we've talked before, I'm sending you the requested file. Sincerely, Chuck. Joe:...
6
votes
1answer
67k views

How to say that my English isn't very good?

A: My English is poor. B: My English is not good. C: I am not good at English. D: My English is bad. Which one is more appropriate to use in conversation?
2
votes
1answer
255 views

Does “That {thing / one} I don't know” sound natural?

I know that some people use this when they want to say that they have no idea about that particular thing. But the thing is that, in my case none of them are native English speakers. So I thought it's ...
2
votes
2answers
638 views

You're at a restaurant waiting for a table. People leave a table, now can you say “a table just became free”?

You're at a restaurant waiting for a table. People leave a table, now can you say "a table just became free"? or "a table just became available"? or something else? What's the most common/natural way ...
1
vote
1answer
750 views

Correct use of “kinda” and “somewhat”

What's the difference between "kinda" and "somewhat" generally and also in these examples? 1.I'm kinda annoyed 2.I'm somewhat annoyed
2
votes
2answers
18k views

How to ask somebody what position they are working as?

Sometimes when talking to a person newly met in a office, we need to ask them which position they are working in. How to ask that ? I have the following lines in my head, but not sure if they will ...
1
vote
5answers
19k views

How to say “pay exact amount of money”

If cashier tells you that: I don't have change. Could you "pay exact amount of money"? How to say "to pay exact amount of money" in good English?
3
votes
3answers
850 views

What does she exactly say?

Man: Oh, God! Did you....um...Did you set the alarm before we left? Woman: Yes, the last thing I did! Man: No, I was the last one to leave. I was the last one to leave and I'm sure I didn'...
13
votes
3answers
40k views

How to decline a help offer politely

I was just wondering how can I decline a help offer politely from someone whom especially I don't know very well. For example, I am moving in a new house and a neighbor sees me carrying boxes and ...
0
votes
3answers
863 views

The most fitting way to start a phone conversation with a potential employer

I'm currently looking for a job and making a mental plan of what to say, potential questions and answers to them etc. and I was wondering what would be the best and most fitting way to start a phone ...
2
votes
2answers
505 views

Using Present Perfect with the exact time during speech

I've noticed that sometimes during the conversation I use the PP first and then I want to add an additional information on the exact time, e.g. Yeah, I've already told you about that (pause)... ...
5
votes
2answers
23k views

Is this natural English: How was it yesterday?

People say: how was your weekend? But do they say: how was it yesterday? Is this the natural way of asking about how their yesterday went?
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there a way to refer to a person (using a pronoun) without mentioning a sex? [duplicate]

I just found myself in situation that I am telling about someone who added to me in Skype: because of the nickname I think that it is a girl and used all the time the word «she». But as she didn't say ...
12
votes
5answers
20k views

Did you get married before

One of my colleague is single. I want to know does he have any "marriage" experience. Should I say: Did you get married before? or Have you been married before?
1
vote
1answer
10k views

Hope you are doing well [closed]

I am going to a business trip and my boss wrote an email saying Hope you are doing well. What does that mean? And how to reply?
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Is there anything wrong with this 'Is there anything wrong'?

Here is a dialog from a post on an English learning blog. M: Do we need to get together to plan our seminar? W: Is there anything wrong with right now? Is there anything wrong with the dialog? ...
14
votes
1answer
37k views

“I didn't know” or “I haven't known”?

Suppose that in a conversation, our conversational partner just said something completely new to us, and we want to express that we didn't know (or haven't known) about it before. For example, A: ...
3
votes
2answers
10k views

What does “tip a cow” mean?

I was watching "The Big Bang theory" S7 E9. And I couldn't understand the meaning of "tip a cow". Please also explain the remaining conversation too. I am an Asian and not good at ...
7
votes
2answers
54k views

Is there any difference to say on the phone “ this is John” or “ It's John”

Suppose I phoned my friend's house or a firm where people dont know me . Is there any difference to say on the phone "Hi, this is John " or "Hi, It's John" in terms of politeness or formality? or ...
3
votes
1answer
108k views

Give me a call when available

What is the appropriate (polite) way to ask someone to call me? Could I say: Please give me a phone call when available. or Please contact me when you have a chance.
10
votes
1answer
16k views

Asking “Who is this?” on the telephone

A telephone call might start like this *ring* *ring* Alice: Hello, who is this? Bob: Hey, Bob here. Is this Alice? Alice: Yes, indeed. Now in school I learned to use this for objects in my ...
4
votes
3answers
160k views

Which is the best way to start the conversation when we are calling a telephone number back?

I had a missed call from an unknown number. I want to call them back. Which is the best way to start the conversation? The caller may be an interviewer. I just noticed I have a missed call […]. ...
7
votes
2answers
188k views

How should I reply to “take care”?

What should I reply with when someone ends conversation with "take care" in online chats or in-person?
9
votes
3answers
36k views

How to answer “What would you like to drink?” in this case

If I visit a friend, and he/she asks me a question like this: My friend: What would you like to drink? Me: I’ll have an orange juice, please. I understand we use “I’ll” (“I will”) when we ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

What are the differences between “All right” and “That's all right.”

When someone says “Thank you”, we may say “That's all right.” I wonder, what does “that” refer to ? What's the meaning of “all right”? When you agree someone's proposal, you would say “OK” or “All ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

what do you intend to do after graduation

If I want to know what career/occupation/job a student intends to have, how should I phrase the question idiomatically? Do native speakers say these? What do you intend to do after graduation? What ...
6
votes
2answers
17k views

What are the alternatives for “I was going to ask you”?

What are the alternatives (but not too formal or unnecessary polite) to "I was going to ask you" phrase to start conversation with the question?
6
votes
2answers
6k views

Should I say “I don't know” or “That I don't know”?

When someone asks a question, is the reply, "That I don't know" correct? Or is the simpler "I don't know" a more correct or proper response?

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