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Questions tagged [conversational-deletion]

is for questions about the omission of some initial portion of a sentence that sometimes occurs in speech and other informal speech-like mediums, for example e-mail and texting.

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12 votes
3 answers
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What Does 'It's on' Mean When Used in Anger?

I often hear the phrase "It's on" in conversations, particularly in situations filled with anger or confrontation. Could someone explain what this phrase means in such contexts? Is it always ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
55 views

What's the syntax of "It's everything you've ever heard it is"? [closed]

Source: "Boardwalk Empire" Season 01 Episode 07 00:29:19 Mary Dittrich (the girlfriend of the photographer Robert Dittrich): Relax. It's not like he saw us together. Angela Darmody (the ...
Zhang Jian's user avatar
  • 1,063
0 votes
1 answer
27 views

"Then a message that . . ." with no main verb

In the following boldfaced sentence, a main verb is missing. Is this natural in native speech? “People got me out of my room at 3am. This night was a horror, I slept in my clothes in my bed because I ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,996
0 votes
2 answers
62 views

Is "but" required, optional, or forbidden after "[I’m] not going to lie"?

Is it weird to add but after not going to lie? Not going to lie, but this week really flew by. Not going to lie; this week really flew by. I have heard people use this phrase without but. Is it ...
Student's user avatar
  • 307
1 vote
2 answers
1k views

Is it correct to say "an additional time"?

Suppose you want to ask your boss to give you more time. Is it correct and idiomatic to say Would you please give me an additional time? I know that I can say "additional time" without the article....
Cardinal's user avatar
  • 6,025
6 votes
1 answer
1k views

Informal question construction: "Anyone know what...", "Everyone finished?"

I've encountered this slight problem with an informal sentence: Anyone know what a serrated knife is? I thought the sentence was incorrect - there's no ·s for the third person singular. However, ...
Adéla's user avatar
  • 61
2 votes
2 answers
452 views

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone grammar

A movie line in the Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (Hagrid): They're goblins. Clever as they come, but not the most friendly of beasts. Can anyone help me to give a full sentence of the ...
Shen JinWei's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
2k views

Omitting personal pronouns in informal conversation

When chatting informally, either in person or over text, it seems common to shorten the sentences by omitting pronouns: - Made it home? - Yeah. Should've taken a bus. - Hope you don't ...
Maciej Stachowski's user avatar
5 votes
4 answers
1k views

Can "because" be followed by an adjective?

I was checking the definition for the word gauche on Cambridge, I found this line: "awkward and uncomfortable with other people, especially because young and without experience" My question can we ...
Cardinal's user avatar
  • 6,025
3 votes
2 answers
2k views

Start a sentence with "Just that"

Can I start a sentence with "Just that", like: It tastes good. (it's) just that it's too expensive. Can I drop the "it's" at the start? If not, what's a good substitute that sounds casual and ...
Hiếu's user avatar
  • 89
0 votes
1 answer
61 views

Simply using past participle. Is it right?

I was having a conversation with one of my friends. And then he started talking about someone I didn't want to talk about. So I said, "Forget him". He replied, "Forgotten". Huh? Like really what does ...
user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
491 views

Can I omit "it" when I say "Sounds good."?

I'm not sure if it's OK to say "Sounds good" instead of "It sounds good". If it is so, when can I omit "it"? Can I also say "Will rain", instead of "It will rain"?
ironsand's user avatar
  • 927
2 votes
2 answers
1k views

Simple past or past participle in a CV?

On many CVs I see sentences like: • Achieved this. • Managed that. I am assuming this isn't a case of Conversational Deletion and these tenses are past participles. So if I were to use an ...
Maurizio's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote
1 answer
3k views

Leaving out the "subject" at the beginning of a sentence

Leaving out the "subject" at the beginning of a sentence? I think this mostly concerns spoken English! Is this considered grammar correct or just a phenomenon that occurs in intimate conversational ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
  • 25.1k
0 votes
1 answer
74 views

Help with Nouns vs Verbs

What is the difference between saying "Pleasure to" vs. "Pleased To" Is it better to use nouns or verbs? What rings better?
Milalalala's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
182 views

Using adjectives in the place of adverbs

I've heard some sentences which do not really make sense to me regarding the usage of adjectives. ex) " It started a bit rocky" " I grew up bilingual" Why isn't the fist sentence "It start a bit ...
JoAnn's user avatar
  • 523
1 vote
2 answers
157 views

Can "Got" be used instead of "Do you have"?

Jeff Kramer: Got any green beans? Counter Help: Sure do. Nice and fresh. Do you want mashed potato or French fries? Source. I guess in the above context "Got" means "Do you have". Am I right? ...
AR AM's user avatar
  • 1,257
1 vote
1 answer
60 views

Usage of Simple Present between speakers

Is the use of "Do" in the begining of interrogative sentence necessary? I means, casual conversation. Does he play tennis? He plays tennis?
Shinomoto Asakura's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
2k views

Omitting the subject from a sentence

I wrote: Your sentences are almost good, just tried to offer better alternatives. To mean "I just tried". Does my sentence conveys the subject is "I" in spoken language?
Ahmad's user avatar
  • 8,929
0 votes
3 answers
112 views

"OF" at the beginning of the sentence

What does of mean when it comes at the beginning of the sentence, for example: Of pride of remembrance of the encounter with the bear on that hillside in the early spring.
samerr's user avatar
  • 131
1 vote
1 answer
112 views

Why do we say "seen Jim?" and omit "have you"?

In some sentences we don't use some words. For example, instead of. Do you want a ride? we say Want a ride? Instead of I'm just coming, hang on! we say just coming, hang on! Instead ...
Majid's user avatar
  • 73
2 votes
1 answer
445 views

What is the part of speech of the word " fancy" in the following content?

Recently,i saw a sort of propoganda/advertisement about body-building on a random chap's instagram. 1.OP:"Fancy losing inches off your waist?Flattening your tummy?Fancy winning a waist trainer that ...
오준수's user avatar
  • 1,211
1 vote
2 answers
126 views

the usage of 'never done' in colloquial English

Dialogues: Have you been to Paris? No, never been. Have you heard John's ex-wife? No, never heard. Can I shorten the answers as above in colloquial English?
Little_Grass's user avatar
  • 1,039
2 votes
1 answer
193 views

"Anyone have an extra apartment there?"

Anyone have an extra apartment there? This quote is from an English native speaker. Why "anyone have"? This could be an elliptical question, but I'd expect native speakers to ask a question using an ...
learner's user avatar
  • 5,918
2 votes
1 answer
78 views

Lucky, she thought, that he was not aware of it

Lucky, she thought, that he was not aware of it. This sentence is from a Korean grammar text that I read in my old school days. It’s translation - 그가 그것을 눈치채지 못한 것은 다행이라고 그녀는 생각했다 - is just like this ...
Listenever's user avatar
  • 24.2k
1 vote
3 answers
415 views

What does this mean: "Going to be something doing in the >humidity line< to-night"?

There's a line in the "Girl" story of O Henry saying, "Going to be something doing in the humidity line to-night." What does this mean? I didn't get the "humidity line" ...
alu's user avatar
  • 239
3 votes
1 answer
10k views

"Looking forward to hearing from you" - May I omit "I am" at the beginning?

At the end of a letter, is it correct to omit "I am" in this sentence? I am looking forward to hearing from you Then it will become: Looking forward to hearing from you
canoe's user avatar
  • 2,516
3 votes
1 answer
170 views

Can 'bit of' be used?

As Harry helped himself to a treacle tart, the talk turned to their families. "I'm half-and-half," said Seamus. "Me dad's a Muggle. Mom didn't tell him she was a witch 'til after they were ...
Listenever's user avatar
  • 24.2k