Questions tagged [countable-nouns]

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Do you need {some/any} scissors? Yes. Do you have {some/any}?

A: Do you need _____ scissors? B: Yes. Do you have _____? a. any/any b. any/some c. some/any d. some/some My answer is b. any/some. Is that correct? Or is it choice c. some/any because some scissors =...
NRCSSD's user avatar
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1 answer
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Can I use some other + single noun

I wrote a sentence I got a maximum grade from Mathematics, Physics, Biology, and some other subject I don’t remember., but Grammarly thinks it's an agreement mistake and suggests changing to some ...
banan3'14's user avatar
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0 answers
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Words with plural-only nouns

Some words are used only with singular countable nouns, others only with plural countable nouns and others only with uncountable nouns Category singularcountable pluralcountable uncountable plural-...
Gostlly's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
247 views

What type of nouns are 'cattle', 'staff' and 'jeans'?

I was taught that there are four types of nouns: singular countable: journey, sheep, child plural countable: journeys, sheep, children singular uncountable: travel, water, fruit plural uncountable:...
Kyamond's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is there any rule that there should always be an article before a singular, uncountable, and common noun?

Sentence is - For a long time, paracetamol has been recommended as a first-line drug in pain management guidelines. On Google, I found that "paracetamol" is a common noun and is also a ...
Aryendu Kumar's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
56 views

Is it right that common nouns after "the whole" are countable and after "the whole of the" are uncountable?

Trying to understand when I need to use "the whole" before common nouns and when "the whole of the", I came across the following rule on wordreference.com: If a singular common ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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turn their ambition/ambitions into reality/a reality

Since 'ambition' and 'reality' can be either countable or uncountable, do I have to use them both countably like Sentence 1 or I can use one of them countably while the other one uncountably like ...
newbie forever's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
271 views

A new type of drugs or a new type of drug

In the grammar textbook I've been reading, there is a class of partitive constructions called 'Partition in respect of quality' with an example as below: a new kind of computer → new kinds of ...
Brack Bruno's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
767 views

How many beans vs How much beans?

When talking about beans, lentils or chickpeas should they be considered as countable or uncountable? Would a person normally say "How many beans should I cook?" or "how much beans ...
heapOverflow's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
136 views

Mood: countable or uncountable

Some dictionaries, such as Cambridge dictionary, show that mood is a countable noun. The drink had put him in an amiable mood. Other dictionaries, such as Macmillan dictionary, show that mood can be ...
chenzhongpu's user avatar
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0 answers
13 views

Common noun and article, determiners

Should we use articles and determiners before a singular-count common noun all the time? Are there exceptions? For example: A teacher plays an important role. but why fish lives in water?
Muhammad Sayif ul islam's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

Is it "tiny amount" or "tiny amounts"?

Can we use tiny amounts of something? Or are we have to use only in singular form, such as "tiny amount of any liquid"? I've seen people use small amounts and/or a small amount of something, ...
Qaher's user avatar
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1 answer
805 views

What's the difference between "build a rapport" and "build rapport"?

I had a look on the Internet and came across both "build a rapport" (eg. I enjoy building a rapport with customers) and "build rapport" (eg. I enjoy building rapport with customers)...
Eclairyang's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
330 views

Is it not many variety or not much variety?

Is it very confusing when we have to decide many or much on things we're not sure whether it's countable or cannot be counted. Money can be counted, but still it is with much? So who decides the logic?...
Mallimika's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
298 views

Can we connect two of the same plural nouns with a preposition?

Are these examples correct? Villages after villages were destroyed by terrorists. City after city was set on fire. Pages after pages were reviewed multiple times.
Ranjith Kumar's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
56 views

One of them is [species] Can I put a plural form there?

My grammar book says that you can say "the dog," "a dog" and "dogs" to refer dogs. This book says "dogs" is the most casual and common way of saying that among ...
Nigutumok's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
64 views

The usage of 'how much'?

I typed in the following sentence in Grammarly and it keeps telling me that I had a problem with the subject-verb agreement: How much of each tea makes up the mixed tea is not known. (My incorrect ...
user464688's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
285 views

Is it less funds or fewer funds?

As far as I know, countable nouns are used with 'few' and 'fewer,' whereas uncountable ones go with 'little' and 'less.' However, I encountered these examples: Reduced saving means less funds for ...
Arseny Aleev's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
31 views

Word count with contraction such as Let's [closed]

In various situations it is desired to count the number of words in a statement. For example, in dictation practice for learning to type. So in a phrase such as "Let's go Brandon" how would ...
BillOnne's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
394 views

How many percent/percents?

I just learned that the plural form of "percent" is percents, so can we say how many percents of apples are there in a lot? instead of "how many percent of apples are there in a lot? ...
Maurice's user avatar
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"food vs foods" and "clothing vs clothes"?

There are two pair sentences about products in Japan, as follows. Which one, each, is better or (more) correct? And why? food vs foods 1a) More than 60% of food consumed in Japan is imported from ...
T.K.Tommy's user avatar
8 votes
4 answers
3k views

Why the "soap" here is singular?

I'm learning TOEFL recently, and today I stumbled on this sentence from TPO 47: There was a town that passed a law that banned the sale of a certain kind of soap. There was an ingredient in this soap ...
babeimi's user avatar
  • 109
-1 votes
2 answers
81 views

three foods & three pieces of food

as far as I know: In the UK "an item of fruit" can be replaced with "a fruit". In the USA "an item of fruit" can be replaced with "a piece of fruit". For ...
Loviii's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
569 views

Is "handwriting" countable or uncountable? [closed]

Which do I say? You have good handwriting. or You have a good handwriting.
Mariam Ayman's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
435 views

This is mashed potatoes or These are mashed potatoes

This question arose in the discussion of a language learning app. Its original sentence is in Russian and it says Это пюре а вот пицца. The translation from the app is This is mashed potatoes and ...
user516076's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
52 views

Countable nouns must always have determiners or should be plural?

I've learnt countable nouns must always have determiners or should be plural. However, the construction pattern between A and B seems to be an exception. There are even stories of half-trained ...
joy2020's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
1k views

in the sentence "there is 2 litres of milk" is 2 litres countable or uncountable?

Is "2 litres" in the above sentence a countable noun? I have had mixed answers for this question. Some say yes, and some, no. I have read articles, but none give me any clear answer. ...
kavish Bhardwaj's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
237 views

Is the word "foods" countable or uncountable?

Sentence: Whole foods means food that's in its original form, straight from nature, typically whole fruits, veggies, whole grains, et cetera. I want to know why "means" not "mean" ...
erika999's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
764 views

Is it correct to use ''scores of (something)'' with uncountable nouns?

''Score of something'' means ''a lot of something.'' Although it is correct to use ''a lot of'' with uncountable nouns, I've never seen an example of ''scores of something'' used with an uncountable ...
user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is "fruit" used as a countable or uncountable noun?

I don't know if "fruit" works as a singular or a plural in these cases: HOW MANY fruit(s) or HOW MUCH fruit do you eat a day? Today I have had three fruit(s).
zenith3's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is there a grey area between substance noun and object noun? [closed]

Is there a grey area between substance noun and object noun? I mean, are there any English words that mean ‘substance or object’? If so, should I use an indefinite article, or not?
user09827's user avatar
  • 305
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

Name is countable or uncountable?

Let's say I'm writing a story and there's a character named Jim and he sees 10 identical people who have similarities with his friend Emily, in fact, they look exactly like Emily. What would Jim ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,002
0 votes
1 answer
122 views

"merit": countable vs uncountable

The word "merit" seems to be used as both countable and uncountable, in both single and plural forms: "there is no much merit" — 23k results "the claim has no merit" — ...
Greendrake's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
140 views

Is an adjective make uncountable noun countable?

I've mentioned in the previous question a few days ago that advice is an uncountable noun. I've seen when the noun is attached with an adjective beside it, there are some that have article a and some ...
user516076's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
84 views

Error Detection in noun [duplicate]

I am confused in this sentence : There are two scores of books (A) / which are lying (B) / unused in the library (C) / no error (D). The answer is part (A) and error is mentioned as scores. I am ...
Sudhir Sharma's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
43 views

Any with singular count noun

I've been having problems with the use of any, I've read that you can use it for negative and questions with non-counts and plural count nouns, but there is an exception that you can use any with ...
Mary's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
0 answers
43 views

Looking for a smartphone that has "good battery backup"? Why not "a good battery backup"?

Looking for a smartphone that has "good battery backup"? Why is it not "a good battery back up"? Why do we have to omit the article? If you are looking for a smartphone with a ...
Soumya Thota's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
95 views

There's an awareness of conspicuous consumption. Why is the article 'an' needed before awareness when awareness is an uncountable noun?

1.There's an awareness of conspicuous consumption. Why is the article "an" needed before awareness when awareness is an uncountable noun? Greenpeace works to promote awareness of the dangers ...
Soumya Thota's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
923 views

Many colours and much colour

Many colours mean many types of colour, and much colour means a large quantity of colour, is it right? Colourful - Having much or varied colour https://www.lexico.com/definition/colourful
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
65 views

They have to have a basic understanding of computers in order to use advanced technology.how is understanding countable here?Why the article 'a' used?

1.They have to have a basic understanding of computers in order to use advanced technology. 2.Yet in the long run would a wider sense of mutual understanding make us safer? In both cases 'a' is used ...
Soumya Thota's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

Which expression is correct "Many eyes" or "a lot of eyes"? [duplicate]

Which of the below expression is correct? Argos has many eyes. Argos has a lot of eyes.
Goerman's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
2 answers
411 views

How can a noun be countable and uncountable at the same time?

How can a noun be countable and uncountable at the same time? For example 'shock'. You can get a shock. I'm suffering from __ shock.
YourNeighbour's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

When to use singular or plural for countable words?

Main point is regarding the last sentence about the avocado. Here is an example: "A long time ago sushi was not popular to Westerners because they did not like to eat raw fish. Alternatively, ...
elaine's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
91 views

'at very high altitude', 'at very high altitudes': both are okay in this sentence?

I'd like to know and ask whether both the sentences below are correct. At very high altitude you will have difficulty breathing. At very high altitudes you will have difficulty breathing. My ...
Smart Humanism's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
76 views

Society: countable, uncountable, or both in this particular case?

Could you please help with the following: are both options correct? If so, which one is preferred and why? Option 1: Our society had been gradually morphing from a very uncivilised one to the society ...
ZenBerry's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
51 views

Could you please suggest the correct article usage here?

In the following sentence, do I need an article before "external influence"? The juvenile being more vulnerable to (an?) external influence such as numerous marketing campaigns tend to be ...
ZenBerry's user avatar
  • 387
1 vote
1 answer
40 views

Why don't these countable nouns have articles in this sentence?

Why exactly don't "header" and "body" need articles in the following sentence (as per this answer)? We've improved the visual separation between header and body in classes with ...
thorn's user avatar
  • 186
0 votes
1 answer
78 views

Countability of the word “gameplay”

I have searched all the online dictionaries, and they all say that the word “gameplay” is uncountable. The problem is that they don’t have the up-to-date meaning of the word “gameplay”. Can we use the ...
Ayden Ferguson's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
194 views

“Great advancement” vs. “Great advancements”

I have seen great advancement in technology in recent times. I have seen great advancements in technology in recent times. What is the difference between #1, and #2? To me, both seem to mean “...
Ayden Ferguson's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

"is proven" or "are proven" in this sentence?

This is my version: Metallo-organic anti-wear additive system in Havoline ProDS Fully Synthetic ECO 5and ProDS Fully Synthetic LE SAE 5W-40 is proven to protect engines under a broad range of ...
PinaColada33's user avatar

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