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Questions tagged [countable-nouns]

The tag has no usage guidance.

3
votes
3answers
13k views

Money - Countable or Uncountable noun

This page suggests that we use much with only uncountable nouns whereas the use of many/several is limited to countable nouns only. So I conclude that money is uncountable noun as I've heard people ...
100
votes
10answers
21k views

Why do we say “I love cake” but “I love cars”?

Why do some nouns need to be in the plural for that structure to work, while some are ok in the singular? E.g.: I love pizza, I love beef, etc. I always thought it was a matter of countable x ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

Are amounts of money singular or plural?

Are the two sentences correct or is one of them incorrect? 1) Five billion dollars is earmarked for the project. 2) Five billion dollars has been earmarked for the project. I know dollars are ...
7
votes
1answer
5k views

Confusion about 'less' and 'fewer' in sentences with countable/uncountable nouns

There were no less (or no fewer) than fifty persons in the dining hall. In 25 words or fewer/less, please summarize what took place. fewer / less calories? The hamburgers should contain no less/fewer ...
20
votes
10answers
6k views

“She speaks an impeccable English” vs “She speaks impeccable English”

What is the difference between these sentences? She speaks an impeccable English. She speaks impeccable English. I understand both are correct but is one simply more specific because of ...
4
votes
1answer
405 views

How to use a word when its meaning is both countable & uncountable?

A meaning of a noun in English may be both countable & uncountable. For example, The Longman dictionary says: fruit [countable, uncountable]: something that grows on a plant, tree, or bush,...
2
votes
1answer
189 views

Listing differnet kinds of an uncoutable noun. Are they countable or uncountable?

How do you I refer to different kind of an uncountable noun? For example, this is a part of my writing: Using oil (coconut oil, olive oil) to moisturize your skin after bath. Those oil... I want ...
2
votes
2answers
87 views

In the sentence of concern, should I use the plural form of the noun?

If you like a song, and you think it's catchy, could you say this? Songs don't get much catchier than this. My concern is the plural songs, when people say things similar to Life can't/doesn't ...
5
votes
2answers
6k views

Why is 'for examples' wrong?

If you want to take an example or several examples, you use the phrase 'for example,' not 'for examples.' Though the word 'example' is a countable noun, why is 'for examples' wrong?
3
votes
2answers
11k views

should it be ice cream or ice creams?

Should the term ice cream, in the sentence below, be countable or uncountable? The bowl consists of mini scoops of chocolate, vanilla and strawberry ice cream. The bowl consists of mini ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

“There is a fog.” Is the noun used correctly?

My kid saw the scene and told me, There is a fog. Do we use "a" before fog?
2
votes
1answer
668 views

paddy field - is it countable or uncountable noun?

In some areas, **some fields could be found among the river, houses, etc. Could I say "some paddy fields"?
1
vote
1answer
17k views

Is “funds” a plural or singular noun?

The dictionary enlists it as "fund," but the word "funds" is used quite often and it means money (Ok, it can have other meanings as well. I get that) Do I say, then, how much funds did the ...