Questions tagged [determiners]

A 'determiner' is one of a fixed class of words placed before a noun phrase to indicate its definiteness, quantity, or degree.

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The uses, the context, the kind of noun?

The Little, Brown Handbook 9ed, section 16h says 1. Use a, an, and the where they are required. ... 2. Use other determiners appropriately. The uses of English determiners besides articles also ...
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do [the/some] online banking vs. do [the/some] grocery shopping

In the following phrases, is it optional to include the bracketed part? do [the/some] online banking do [the/some] grocery shopping
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Question about a determiner

This sort of problem is quite common. This kind of exercise is very popular. In the above sentences, the expressions kind of and sort of are used. I'm not sure whether those are the subjects of the ...
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Must I use "my" when referring to my own bodypart or can I use "the" without technically breaking any rules?

I'm currently trying to understand if the following sentence breaks any rules: I grab this hair band first thing in the morning to make sure that I don't have my hair on the forehead and nothing is ...
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What is correct, "a club day" or "the club day"?

Do you know if Monday is a/the club day? Should I use a or the? Club days are days when we do our club activities. As Monday is usually not a/the club day but the next one will be the early May bank ...
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Repetition of determiner "this"

I came across these sentences here and I wondered if it is OK to repeat the determiner "this". It sounded a little awkward to me. If you decide to complete an application for coverage in ...
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What’s the head of a determiner phrase with more than one determiner?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Determiner_phrase “My sons” If it’s a noun phrase, the head is “sons”. If it’s a determiner phrase, the head is “my”. “All my sons” If it’s a noun phrase, the head is ...
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"From which to" how should I interpret this?

The full sentence is this: Instead of creating a mathematical model from which to predict performance, the workload can be characterized, simulated, and then tested on clouds of different scales. ...
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Do you need the determiner "the" for a name of place?

This is something weird. Example: I go to the city. Yesterday, I went to New York City. You can see from the examples that when the city has a name, it doesn't use the word "the." But is ...
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Why doesn't "autism spectrum disorder" require an indefinite article?

Example sentence: He may have a personality disorder, a depressive disorder, or autism spectrum disorder. Why is that personality disorder and depressive disorder requires an a but not autism ...
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Do we omit "the" and use "that/those" when referring specific events?

Suppose today is Wednesday. I saw 3 concerts consecutively in 3 days in the past with the detail is as follows: I saw the first concert on Sunday, the second was on Monday, and the last concert I saw ...
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Do we say "most of + possessive + a noun"?

Someone asked the grammaticality of this sentence in our group: I liked the most our trip to Scotland. Someone has tried to help. He wrote that the sentence could be fine if they removed "the&...
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The brother of ___ is a doctor

We can say 'A brother of mine is a doctor.' The more common way of saying is 'One of my brothers is a doctor.' But in a case where a listener knows my brother or I have only one brother. Should we ...
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Whaf does 'much' in this sentence convey?

"He smiled at the idea of holding negotiations with the woman who had much the nicer hair". What does 'much' in this sentence convey ?
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Why isn't the noun plural in “there must be some mistake”?

I'm learning English dialogue according to EnglishPod. There is a sentence: But there must be some mistake; my reservation was for a standard room. Why isn't the plural form of "mistake" ...
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How to differentiate "this" and "that" to mean "so"?

I'm confused about differentiating these "this" and "that" when they're used to mean "so". E.g. Can you tell me why you're this angry? Can you tell me why you're that ...
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How do I use "both" with someone who is a doctor and professor?

I would like to know if a person is a doctor and a professor, how should I address that person in writing? “Doctor and Professor” “Doctor/Professor” Can I use “both” to say what their professions ...
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that cousin of Jane

a. That cousin of Jane who is a doctor was at the party. (That cousin, not the other cousin or cousins. That specific one) b. That door of the house that faces east was damaged. (That door, not the ...
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Too much kit, or too many kits?

Kit as a set of tools is a countable noun (Longman), yet I've seen somewhere the following sentence: one can never have too much kit or too many bikes! and I'm thinking whether it's a mistake? ...
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Use of determiner THE with a plural noun

Is it more appropriate to say or write: "Canadian provinces and territories are much larger than American states." Or "THE Canadian provinces and territories are much larger than THE ...
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"more profitable than that" vs "more profitable than that one" [closed]

This company is more profitable than that. This company is more profitable than that one. Are both sentences natural, or only the second one?
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Generalizing with the: the child and the children

Schools should concentrate more on the child and less on exams. Schools should concentrate more on the children and less on exams. I have been told that those two sentences above are correct. Could ...
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2 votes
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Is addressing a neutral noun feminine grammatical?

I found this excerpt from Oxford Grammar Course: In modern English, countries are most often it(s), though she/her is also common. Canada has decided to increase its/her trade with Russia. Is the ...
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Can an adjective precede a determiner? [closed]

Start browsing our collection of officially licensed the Beatles merchandise. For my job, I am required to write about various types of products. Recently, while I was writing about band merchandise, ...
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"Look at the pictures" or "Look at these pictures"?

One exercise in my English Grammar book asks to describe the picture, as shown in the following picture: Since "pictures" are plural, I think it would be better to use "these" ...
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"some customers" referring to a particular group of people

I am wondering if "some customers" can refer to a specific group of people at the restaurant in the following context. Does it need to be changed into "Some of the customers" or &...
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Using fewer or less in a sentence

There were no less than (= as many as) a thousand people buying tickets. In the sentence above, does "less" work as an adverb modifying "were"? There were no fewer than a ...
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Which is correct between Case A and Case B?

Based on the following sentence, which analysis is correct, Case A or Case B? The few minutes of attention he is giving you is sacrificial. Case A: core noun : attention determiner : the few ...
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1 vote
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Using "Much" with a gerund

Much walking was necessary.​ "Much" as a determiner (quantifier) is used in negative sentences or questions, but it can be used in positive ones though it's formal or unnatural. However, in ...
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6 votes
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Problem regarding the use of determiners in the English language

Which one of the following sentences is grammatically sound: There is still little milk in the glass. There is still a little milk in the glass. There is still some milk in the glass. ? My opinion ...
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"A way" or "any way" , what is correct?

What of these is correct? and if both are correct, what is there any difference or connotation in the meaning? or, are there different in terms of formality? Is there a way you could send me the ...
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How to use the determiner THE

I need to hand my pupils a list of adverbs about feelings. Should I entitle it: "Adverbs to express intensity of feelings" or "Adverbs to express THE intensity of feelings"?
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Can you use "any" with other tenses?

I have looked through many websites and know that when "any" is used as a determiner, it can be used with countable or uncountable nouns. I also read in my textbook that when "any" ...
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Can determiners modify noun phrases?

How does 'both' function in the example below? Is the determiner modifying the entire noun phrase 'Jack and Jane'? I know this is correct English; however, in most examples, determiners only modify a ...
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2 votes
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What is the grammatical function of 'all' in 'noun + all'?

The people all wanted a new leader. In the above example, what is the grammatical function of all? Is it an inversion of 'all of the people' or 'all the people'? Or is it something else entirely? I ...
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There was little traffic. / There was a little traffic. / There was heavy traffic

As I understand it (from the picture), the meaning of these sentences is opposite. Right? Then, what's the difference between "a little traffic" and "heavy traffic jams"? Is it a ...
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knife glinting in the sun

In the following sentence, should "knife" have been preceded by an article or other determiner? If not, what kind of structure does not need one? The villain, a hulking lug with Manuel ...
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1 vote
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There are some beautiful flowers / There are beautiful flowers [duplicate]

Do these sentences have any difference in their meaning? Does "some" mean in this context - not all flowers are beautiful in this garden for them? There are some beautiful flowers in the ...
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"not those ones you have" / "not those you have"

Is a word "ones" excess or natural here? If it's excess, please, explain this rule with some examples. I don't see "not those ones you have" on the Google Books and Ngram, only &...
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3 votes
2 answers
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"Are we required to attend any religious activity weekly?" Should the noun be singular or plural after "any”?

Is the sentence below correct? "Are we required to attend any religious activity weekly?” Is it correct to say “religious activity” or should it be plural, i.e. “religious activities”?
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"haven't a thing" or "haven't any thing (anything)"

When looking up the word "a" in a dictionary, I find this explanation. If the a here is equal to any, then what's the difference in meaning (or nuance) between: I simply haven't a thing to ...
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A singular verb comes after "any of [plural noun]", or a plural one?

In some English text it is said that we should use a singular verb in the following example: Any of the computers needs updating. However, it is said that in the following examples we should use ...
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some people/certain people

a. He had to use threats before some people would help him. b. He had to use threats before certain people would help him. I think in (a) nobody helped him before he used threats. In (b) it seems ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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Can I use two “half” for emphasis?

Instead of “half of an apple is eaten” or “an apple is half eaten,” can I say, “half of an apple is half eaten”?
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"Between each": illogical construction

Page 112 of Garner's fourth edition reads ✳Between each and Other Constructions with Fewer than Two Objects This phrasing is a peculiar brand of illogic, ✳between each house/speech, instead of, ...
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'Some' how to check its usage as a Determiner or as adjective of number

It is said that 'some' classifies as an adjective of number and it is also used as a determiner. 1- When 'some' is used as an adjective in a sentence, how do we check whether it's being used as an ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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They each have two cars/cars

Situation 1: Jack has a car and Ryan has a car. a) They each have a car. b) They each have cars. Which is correct? Situation 2: Jack has two cars and Ryan has two cars. c) They each have two cars. d) ...
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Of all time or Of all times or Of all the time or Of all the times

1 Many people believe that she is among the top ten dancers of all times. 2 Many people believe that she is among the top ten dancers of all time. 3 I think it's the greatest song of all times. 4 I ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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“Every” followed by plural

I’d like to know if it’s grammatically correct to use every in the following sentences: Every five steps forward are followed by ten steps back. Every few months of peace are followed by months of ...
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2 votes
1 answer
109 views

No article for noun + number?

I'd like to understand if there should always be no article before nouns followed by a number, like in the following examples: The train arrives at platform 5. The flight departs from gate 7. In my ...
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