Questions tagged [determiners]

A 'determiner' is one of a fixed class of words placed before a noun phrase to indicate its definiteness, quantity, or degree.

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1answer
21k views

“Both of these” or “Both these”?

Are the two constructions above correct or one of them is incorrect? Which one then? Both of these images resemble an ocean. Both these images resemble an ocean.
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1answer
4k views

Using 'several' and 'some'

What is the difference between these two? Ann has some nieces. Ann has several nieces. OALD defines some as: 3) a large number or amount of something 4) a small amount or number of ...
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1answer
214 views

Dickens: some of its noisiest authorities insisted on **its being received**

in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only. I ...
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1answer
21 views

Noun + number and determiner (page 5, line 2, …)

When a noun is followed by a number (a numbered noun) do we need an article before it? e.g. page 5 vs the page 5. What is the grammatical term for such groups? I read about other types of numerical ...
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1answer
457 views

much - very much, many - very many?

In case of uncountables, the large amount expressed by much like in much water, much money, much sand can be increased by prepending very like in very much water, very much money, very much ...
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1answer
689 views

Difference between “a” and “any”

what is difference between the two following sentences? And which one is grammatical? 1- If there is a car in the garden, it will be towed away. 2- If there is any  car in the garden, it will be ...
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2answers
234 views

All this is Kim's

All this is Kim’s. (CGEL,p.467) There is a universal determinative (all) plus ‘this.’ So ‘this’ would be an equivalent to a subdivisible non-count or singular noun phrase, e.g. the whisky, the book (...

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