Questions tagged [determiners]

A 'determiner' is one of a fixed class of words placed before a noun phrase to indicate its definiteness, quantity, or degree.

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816 views

Maybe a typo mistake

I was reading news and found a mistake. I have just wanted to confirm that, as it does not sound natural to my ears. I feel that the article(a) or maybe this word(many) are not sounding naturally here....
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Can we use "to" before home, if we are using determiners (her, my, your etc.) before home?

I know these sentences are correct: I am going home. I am coming home. I went home. Please let me know, are these sentences also correct or not: I am going to her home. I am ...
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Can you use "the" + "both" + noun?

I came across this sentence "Now therefore, the both parties enter into..." and it seemed incorrect to me. Shouldn't it be "both (of) the parties" or "both parties"? Or is it correct to say "the ...
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"People with messy handwriting have brain working faster than their hands" Why no determiner?

I've found the following meme/caption/poster/whatever-it's-called on Twitter and I don't get why there's no determiner before "brain". I would normally assume it is one of those situations where you ...
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Which is the head in "a number of boys"?

[A number of boys] were absent. (The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, p56) This book says that number is the head of the subject NP, but Angela Downing calls it a "determinative" (that is,...
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Which one is better?: Do you need a/any/some help?

How is the nuance of each one? Do you need help? Do you need a help? Do you need any help? Do you need some help? May I help you? And which one should I use to offer some strangers ...
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Is an expression like "How long does this letter take to arrive at London" unnatural?

(Excuse for my broken English) I am a Japanese student studying English. The other day, my classmate was asked to translate the below Japanese sentence into English by the teacher: ...
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3answers
186 views

I rounded all the numbers vs. I rounded all numbers

Which of these two is correct? "I rounded all the numbers for my calculations" or "I rounded all numbers for my calculations". Or is there a better way to say that I rounded the results of my ...
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506 views

Which is more appropriate to use in sentences like these, you or your?

I remember your talking about how your father died. I remember you talking about how your father died. Are both these sentences grammatically correct? What's the difference in their meaning?
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"which" as relative determiner?

Sentence 1: I was told my work was unsatisfactory, at which point I submitted my resignation. Sentence 2:Sometimes you may feel too frail to cope with things, in which case do them as soon as it is ...
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How to describe a definite one of Picasso's paintings as well as an indefinite one of them?

I'm sure there are many, many paintings drawn by Pablo Picasso. How do you refer to one of those paintings? First, here's what I know is a correct way of doing so: a. I saw a Picasso at a museum. ...
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1answer
957 views

both the men came in -- both men came in

Example with context UPDATE 15/12/2016 (YouTube link broken): I let go of the door. The door opened and both the men came in. Is the grammar correct in that sentence? I've always thought that the ...
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There are pens on the table. Some pens were brought by him

There are pens on the table. Some pens were brought by him. Can "some pens" in the example refer to the pens on the table? I would like to clarify if grammar allow such a construction in this case?
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Is it an option to put an indefinite article before a professional name?

Thanks for checking your forecast out inside WESH.com. I’m (a) meteorologist Eric Burris. -- WESH.com/weather I’ve read that predicative complement “can have the form of an AdjP or of a bare role ...
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(the, Ø) merger of two airlines

A quote from the NYT: The Justice Department argues that the merger with American would prompt US Airways to shift more travelers to higher-priced flights at American’s larger hubs. Could we ...
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1answer
136 views

How to determine whether I need to use an article before a noun? Can I skip using a, an or the altogether?

How to determine whether I need to use an article before a noun? Can I skip using a, an or the altogether? This doubt has arisen because grammarly points out many a times to me to use determiner ...
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In "Carl's brother" is "Carl's" an adjective?

I'm looking at an elementary school grammar book for my daughter which says: A word that tells which about a noun is an adjective. A word that tells whose about a noun is also an adjective. ...
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Can 'any' and 'some' express mild asking?

Do you have any money? I hope I've been of some help. Can I have some water? (All are from Merriam-Webster’s Learner’s) ‘Any and ‘some’ are very difficult to grasp what they mean in contexts. ...
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'not everyone is prepared' : Is 'not' a determiner?

Despite the overnight detention of Thailand's ousted prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra and a number of family members and politicians, there are indications today that not everyone is prepared to ...
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1answer
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Is the use of an article (the) appropriate here?

In general, a singular common noun is always preceded by an article - a, an, or the. Applying the same rule in the following sentence, we get 1) He is good at the word prediction. I precede word ...
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Two particular usages of "all"

The 5th & 6th definition of "all" in OALD: 5.consisting or appearing to consist of one thing only The magazine was all advertisements. She was all smiles (= smiling a lot). ...
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1answer
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When to use determiners after a preposition?

As far as I know, while using a countable noun you should put a determiner before the countable noun. But some examples confused me. A type of metal button ("button" is a countable noun) A ...
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"as much" vs "much"

While reading a book - "The Glass Palace" - I came across a sentence - He could think of nothing else to say, or as much worth saying. I understood the meaning of this sentence. And I believe ...
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239 views

No Articles for countable and definable words

Source Have a contractor apply ( ) water proofing material from ( ) grade level down. Why do you think "material" and "level" are without an article?
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determiner phrase

He is a child He is more than a child He is just a child He is such a child. Sometime I see one or more words precede the determiner. they can be adverbs or other determiners. Can ...
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1answer
687 views

Can I use two “half” for emphasis?

Instead of “half of an apple is eaten” or “an apple is half eaten,” can I say, “half of an apple is half eaten”?
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How many are you guys? or How many people are you guys? which one is correct?

When I ask "How many are you guys?" or "How many people are you guys?", Which one is correct? I am confused. Can anyone let me know? Thank you for help!
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Multiple vs. Several

I wrote: The user even can specify multiple labels and variables, and store the content of each of them under a separate XML node. Suppose a user can enter a command like: Label1 = Variable1; ...
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If you have (any) questions

Do I need to use any in the following sentence? Does any change the meaning of the following sentence? If you have (any) questions on the subject, feel free to ask me. As an English speaker would ...
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223 views

'The' with noun expressions containing personal names

It is often not clear whether to use the definite article when a personal name is used. Tolstoy's books. — It is John's property. — Somewhere in Steinbeck country. but... The ...
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266 views

Should we end the given sentence with TO in the given situation?

He's this person who I owe 40$ (to). He's this person I owe 40$ to. He's this person who I owe 40$. Are all these sentences grammatically correct? Are the first and second one grammatically ...
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1answer
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Would anyone like a drink?

Does anyone want a drink? vs. Would anyone like a drink? The first sentence is perfectly fine. I just want to know whether the second one is correct and if so whether it's preferred to the first or ...
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255 views

Do I need "some" in "If the weather is not so good, I read a book or some news"?

During my lunch break, I usually go for a walk. If the weather is not so good, I read a book or some news. Can we omit some here? During my lunch break, I usually go for a walk. If the weather is ...
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Indefinite article "a/an" with plural count nouns?

I know we never use the indefinite article ("a/an") before a non-count noun. But what about before plural nouns? Questions: I don't think a plural count noun can follow an indefinite article ("a/an")...
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Singular or plural nouns after "No"

Which of the follows sentences sounds natural to you as an English speaker? Are both the sentences correct? And should I use plural or singular nouns after "no"? Here are the sentences: No man is ...
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2answers
6k views

"There is no" vs. "There is not"

There is no month in calendar that does not have a festival. There is not a month in calendar when there is not a festival. Do the two sentences mentioned above mean the same thing? Why or why not?
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"which soldier is me!” or “which soldier I am!”

I can’t accurately tell what is the subtlety of the use of “which” in this sentence: “But even my own parents won't be able to tell which soldier is me!” If "which" is considered as a ...
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83 views

Why "a" before "elements of a first step"?

I have learned that "the first" is a determiner. So this example arises a question for me. Elements of a first step Could someone explain it? For context
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145 views

Should we use 'of' when describing quantities with 'score' and 'dozen'?

There are two score of books which are lying unused in the library. Why is two score of books used instead of two score books? What is the difference between them? Similarly can we use five dozen ...
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1answer
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Can "a" be removed in the follow case (noun + adjective + adjective)?

Grammaly told me that the "a" in the following sentence is unnecessary and it suggested I remove it: The surface of the guitar was (a) gleaming white. Is Grammaly correct? Why or why not? Note: ...
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If you have any question(s)

What's the difference between the two following sentences? This site says any could also be used with singular nouns in if clauses when it means any kind of. Is it true? Are both following sentence ...
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Which is correct "in spring" or "in the spring"?

Here is my sentence: "This picture was taken in spring / in the spring" commenting on a photograph in a photo documentary. Is there a difference? is the determiner THE necessary and why or why not? ...
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1answer
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"The one" vs "one"

An executed purpose, in short, is a transaction in which the time and energy spent on the execution are balanced against the resulting assets, and the ideal case is one in which the former ...
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Do I use "some", "an" or "a" for "slice of apple"?

If we cut an apple into two slices, what should we say? an apple. or some apple
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Difference between "hardly someone" and "hardly anyone"

The following construction is considered nonstandard in English Nowadays, hardly someone studies ancient Greek. It should be Nowadays, hardly anyone studies ancient Greek. And although the ...
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2answers
109 views

"...or make the hints of a new particle disappear" -- why the indefinite article if the particle has already been mentioned?

I was reading the news and came across this sentence: More data could provide additional details — or make the hints of a new particle disappear. The new particle has already been mentioned ...
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"He went to (X) direction"?

If I want to say that someone went or turned to a direction that I don't know, how is it correct to say that? I have a lot of words that I'm confused about. I don't know which ones are acceptable. (...
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1answer
151 views

"What all three famous men here were doing..." -- why is there no article if the men have been mentioned before?

Here is a chunk from a video on EngVid (the whole piece starts at 0:21; the phrase in question is at 1:06): You might have heard of this expression by Julius Caesar... Similarly, modern times, ...
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1answer
149 views

Why is "any" inappropriate here?

The following is the answer key for an exercise in Macmillan's Straightforward Intermediate coursebook. The instruction asks the student to correct six mistakes (concerning determiners) in the ...
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When does the determiner "each" modify the plural noun?

[A] We interviewed each individual member of the community. (OALD) For they have this meaning for ‘each’: “used to refer to every one of two or more people or things” in OALD, isn’t it proper to ...

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