Questions tagged [determiners]

A 'determiner' is one of a fixed class of words placed before a noun phrase to indicate its definiteness, quantity, or degree.

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3
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2answers
520 views

What about the usage of "any" and "no"?

I taught my students that they can use any in questions with abstract countable nouns. Was I right? For example: Do you have any idea? (idea = abstract but countable) Do you have any reason to do ...
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1answer
133 views

Should a kind of determiner be used before the word "unit"?

Please look at the following sentence. I wouldn't say this that way and would consider a kind of determiner that should be used before the word "unit". What about you please? Sort the telemetry ...
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1answer
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"There was no student" or "There were no students"? Which is correct?

According to this website, "You must put an article in front of a singular count noun.". So my question is "There was no student" is a wrong sentence, isn't it? & "There were no students" is the ...
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1answer
1k views

these organizations or those organizations?

Consider a hypothetical quote: Each day we gather information from manufacturers, distributors, Russian and foreign vendors, research centers. The reliability of the sources is ensured by our ...
3
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1answer
88 views

Is 'all of a' a determiner?

   "Welcome back, Mr. Potter, welcome back."    Harry didn't know what to say. Everyone was looking at him. The old woman with the pipe was puffing on it without realizing ...
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2answers
361 views

why no article before G.D.P.?

A quote from NY Times: For the first quarter, the bureau now says G.D.P. grew at a 1.1 percent rate — after a series of reductions from its initial estimate of 2.5 percent. Why is there no ...
3
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1answer
86 views

Exxon and (∅, the) other oil majors

A quote from The Economist: Yet Exxon and the other oil supermajors are more vulnerable than they look. What if we insert a zero article in THE's position before the "other": Yet Exxon and ...
3
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1answer
177 views

the price of a (the, zero article) traditional higher education

A quote from The Economist (Higher education: The attack of the MOOCs): He thinks this will drive a dramatic reduction in the price of a traditional higher education, that will reduce the total ...
3
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2answers
22 views

"Are we required to attend any religious activity weekly?" Should the noun be singular or plural after "any”?

Is the sentence below correct? "Are we required to attend any religious activity weekly?” Is it correct to say “religious activity” or should it be plural, i.e. “religious activities”?
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1answer
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Usage and omission of "any"

Can I omit any in the following sentences with uncountable nouns? Do they still sound natural without it? If philosophers were made presidents instead of politicians, there would not be (any) war. If ...
3
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1answer
34 views

Difference between "a" and "any": “Can a/any bulletproof vest stop a bullet...?”

What is the difference between a and any in the following sentence? Can a bulletproof vest stop a bullet fired from an AK-47? Can any bulletproof vest stop a bullet fired from an AK-47? Does the ...
3
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2answers
243 views

Conjunction AND

Can someone tell me whether the conjunction and can be used to conjoin the words and phrases in these sentences? At first glance, I think it cannot but I do not know how to explain why. Thank you. ...
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4answers
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Usage of "any" or "some" in "Would you like ..... wine?" [duplicate]

I have got another test question: Would you like ..... wine? any some This test assumes that the only correct answer is 'some' and some people argue that the use of 'any' in this ...
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3answers
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I think we still need to practice some more

We all know here 'some more' used as an 'adverb': Would you like some more cake? I think we still need to practice some more. If the rice is still not cooked, add some more water. ...
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3answers
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How to use "next" - 'your next purchase' is ok, but 'next purchase' is not

According to my grammar books, it reads that you can say "Discount on your next purchase" but not "Discount on next purchase" because you have to put "your" or "the" before "next". Could anyone can ...
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3answers
133 views

Quick questions about pronouns in a sentence

I'm confused when it comes to writing the following: "..., I bought from my one of the sweet sweet friends" vs "...., I bought from one of my sweet sweet friends" Neither me or my partner is native ...
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2answers
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Can you say "a one thing?"

In patent context, I came across an expression "a one end of a conductor and an other end of the conductor." I am wondering why it is "a one end", instead of just "one end", since you don't need an ...
3
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1answer
279 views

Why "the Australian Capital Territory" but not "the New South Wales"?

Why is "the" used in "the Australian Capital Territory", but not before "New South Wales"? Is it as if you started off with "the territory", made "territory" start with a capital letter, and added in "...
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2answers
166 views

Indefinite determiners for introducing an item in plural as new information

Oftentimes you would use an indefinite determiner (a(n), some, Ø) when introducing an item as new information. And I have been thinking of use of determiners when introducing a new item in plural. In ...
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2answers
19k views

Some vs Little Water in specific cases [duplicate]

I have always used the phrase "some water" and "a little water" interchangeably. Recently I took an English quiz and the question was : Please give me (a little / some) _____ water to drink. I ...
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6answers
35k views

Has she came or Did She came

I wanted to ask if my teacher came today or not. What would be the correct way to ask that question? Has teacher came? or Did teacher came?
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3answers
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Can I say "Any tiger is a dangerous animal"?

What is the meaning of this sentence: "Any tiger is a dangerous animal."? A. A tiger in general is a dangerous animal. B. Any tiger, even a sick one, is dangerous.
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3answers
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about All and All of

Before a noun with no determiner, we use all without of. All children need love. (NOT All of children need love.) Link I don't understand why All of children is not correct. Could you explain ...
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5answers
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"every" vs "each"?

Consider: The ten lucky winners will ................. receive $1,000. A) every B) each The answer in the book is each. As far as I know, every and each are used before singular nouns. I cannot ...
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3answers
799 views

Stress in a sentence. Is "some" a determiner in "Get some sleep"?

As far as I know determiners are not stressed as long as we don't need special emphasis. Am I right? If we don't need special emphasis we only stress the content words "get" and "sleep". Am I right?
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3answers
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"My other" or "My another"

Which of these two sentences are correct? a) My other sister is taller than me b) My another sister is taller than me
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1answer
758 views

Plural form after zero

I came across this sentence: I have zero friends Why the plurality? Seems pretty counterintuitive to me. Is there a general grammar rule behind it?
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3answers
582 views

I achieved great results - or some great results?

For the last 2 year I've been using the method I described to you, and I achieved (some) great results. Would such sentence look better with or without the determiner some? What would be the ...
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2answers
6k views

When is it an error to use the "both the + noun" combination?

I've stumbed upon this sentence in Mauilik V's answer on this site: If you have an iPhone 6, for instance, you can use both the sentences to describe its functionality. The use of the definite ...
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1answer
99 views

Usage of Anymore/Any more

Do these sentences use 'anymore/any more' correctly? We won't be trying any more of those products. We won't be trying those products anymore. Spotlight's on him now, he won't be trying anymore funny ...
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2answers
67 views

Is "all" a determinative here?

This all started in 1965. Is 'all' a determinative here or an adverb?
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2answers
35k views

Which is correct? "Happy new year to both of you" or "Happy new year to you both"

Which one is correct? Happy new year to both of you. or Happy new year to you both.
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1answer
23k views

Is "I have no much time." correct?

I know "I have no time." is correct. I have no much time. But as to "I have no much time." to mean "not enough time", the sentence seems to have self-contradiction in a sense. Is the sentence ...
2
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1answer
4k views

"We have lot of money" or "We have a lot of money"

1) We have lot of money. 2) We have a lot of money. Which is correct? I say "we have lot of money." Google says "we have a lot of money" is correct.
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2answers
236 views

They each have two cars/cars

Situation 1: Jack has a car and Ryan has a car. a) They each have a car. b) They each have cars. Which is correct? Situation 2: Jack has two cars and Ryan has two cars. c) They each have two cars. d) ...
2
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1answer
53 views

Why no article?

I'm a university student of English and we are studying "Articles" in our grammar module. Our teacher gave us this sentence, "You have egg on your tie." And asked us why we haven't used an article. ...
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2answers
409 views

Can "some feature" be correct?

His right hand, which he often raised to point at some feature or other, was knotted and twisted, and when I gazed at it, set against Harvard’s antediluvian steeples and columns, it seemed to me ...
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2answers
868 views

Could you fetch me my bag vs could you fetch me the bag?

Could you fetch me my bag? Could you fetch me the bag? Which one is correct? Is it okay to say ' me my' together?
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4answers
25k views

I go to school on foot every day or I go to school every day on foot

Could I write: I go to school every day on foot or should "every day" be at the end of the sentence? How about: go to school by bike go to school by my bike Are both of them okay?
2
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1answer
907 views

Confused about the order of determiners

the last two books the two last books Like the phrase" the two best friends"(I think) the latter would be correct. ...... my last two books my two last books I am confused which of those could ...
2
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1answer
126 views

America's top general, is this a specific one or one of top generals?

America's top general has signalled US troops could engage Islamic State militants on the battlefield, in spite of president Barack Obama's repeated assurance they will not. (Aussie ABC) From the ...
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1answer
2k views

Is snow a countable noun

I was reading news on Yahoo and got confused. I read this – a snow – on Yahoo; as per my opinion snow is not a countable noun. So, we should not use the article (a) before snow. This is from Yahoo: ...
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2answers
1k views

Move "across town" or "across the town"

He moved across town to stay with his father. Why don't we use "a" or "the" in these situations. As: He moved across the town to stay with his father.
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2answers
302 views

What part of speech are "answer" and "enough" in this sentence?

Sirius suggested once, without any real conviction, that they all go to bed, but the Weasleys' looks of disgust were answer enough. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix I don't understand ...
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1answer
57 views

"a pair of variables" and "mixture of Gaussian models", why in the first sentence `a` is correct while is not required in the second sentence?

As I mentioned in my previous question, a is a determiner used with a noun. However, I am confused about the usage of a in the following sentences. Let (x_1, x_2) be a pair of variables. The ...
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1answer
750 views

What's the function of "a" in "a mere three years later"?

The Supreme Court overruled this decision a mere three years later. (source: Wikipedia) Is using an indefinite article "a" to determine three years grammatical? If so, why? Also, is a used here as ...
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1answer
23k views

"Both of these" or "Both these"?

Are the two constructions above correct or one of them is incorrect? Which one then? Both of these images resemble an ocean. Both these images resemble an ocean.
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2answers
112 views

That's dog's feet

You see a set of feet of an animal, and someone asks you a question: What kind of animal has these feet? Would all the following answers be correct, especially the ones with singular pronouns?...
2
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1answer
132 views

Advertising propelled (the) radio

A quote from The Economist (Higher education: The attack of the MOOCs): “Ads propelled radio and TV, why not education? There is a lot of misplaced snobbery in education about advertising,” says ...
2
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1answer
39 views

“Every” followed by plural

I’d like to know if it’s grammatically correct to use every in the following sentences: Every five steps forward are followed by ten steps back. Every few months of peace are followed by months of ...

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