Questions tagged [dialect]

This tag is for questions related to mutually intelligible variations within a language.

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1answer
28 views

except for=but for in British English?

The following is taken from Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's English Dictionary, an American dictionary. I'd like to know whether it's also correct in British English. They would all have died ...
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1answer
41 views

grocery store in American English [closed]

Many dictionaries say "grocery store" means "supermarket" in American English. I'd like to verify if that's the case. Could this term refer to a shop that is not so big as a supermarket, somewhat like ...
-1
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1answer
20 views

Does “off” mean “from” in this context?

In this report, the man said: Who's making the most money off the deal. Does off in this context mean from? and is this use common or just dialectal?
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3answers
40 views

American English - what is the most precise term for that kind of division? [closed]

Is it a dialect? Sub-dialect? Something else?
1
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1answer
56 views

“I done [past verb]” or “I done [present verb]” grammar

So I came across these two weird sentences in some Hip-hop songs and I couldn't figure out in any way that what grammar they're following and the meanings were also really confusing for me. The first ...
3
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1answer
67 views

Where does “day” sound like “die”?

I've seen that words like "day" sound like "die", "pray" sounds like "pry" and so on. I just googled where does day sound like die but didn't get anything. So, are day and die homephones in some ...
2
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2answers
165 views

Why did they use “didn't XXX nobody” rather than “anybody”?

https://newsday.co.tt/2018/11/29/suspect-i-didnt-kill-nobody/ Suspect: ‘I didn’t kill nobody’
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1answer
34 views

What is the difference between International English and other dialects of English? [closed]

What makes International English worthy of the "International" title, and not, say, British English, or American English?
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5answers
9k views

What does “Scary-lookin' fing, inee” mean?

... Harry had never met a vampire, but he had seen pictures of them in his Defence Against the Dark Arts classes, and Black, with his waxy white skin, looked just like one. 'Scary-lookin' fing, ...
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5answers
10k views

Why do the British use the word “flipping” for emphasis?

In the English (British) TV drama, Coronation Street, the word "flipping" is often used to stress a situation, so much so that it feels like a swear word to me to some degree: I've got a flipping ...
2
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1answer
81 views

Is there another verb for “stitch someone up”? What is the American alternative for this verb?

Stitch someone up as in he is gonna stitch her up for the murder. Here is an entry from the Cambridge Dictionary: stitch sb up UK slang — phrasal verb with stitch uk ​ /stɪtʃ/ us ​ /stɪtʃ/ ...
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1answer
51 views
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1answer
750 views

What does aye mean in Australia and New Zealand?

In my previous job I heard many Australian speakers using aye like sorry and pardon to ask for repeating what other person said. I also heard one kiwi guy using aye in the same way. But, now I work ...
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2answers
1k views

Negative numbers: “minus” or “negative”?

I noticed that when negative number are used in speech, there are two dominant patterns. Taking "-10" as an example, in some cases it is pronounced "negative ten", while in others it is "minus ten". ...
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0answers
27 views

institution with a plural verb in British English

I'm wondering whether it's common for a subject referring to a business to go with a plural verb in British English. For example, would it be natural to say "QuickStart Inc. are planning to expand ...
1
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2answers
102 views

What English is this?

The words "yer", "ter", "ernly", "der" and so on, are they Irish? Also the way the contractions are contracted, "don't" to "don'". Hagrid from Harry Potter speaks like that and actually I'm enjoying ...
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1answer
144 views

Is it ok to use “what's” instead of “what does”?

Actually is this construction common in NY English?
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2answers
2k views

Usage of word “In future” or “In the future”

Is it correct to use the word "In Future" or "In the future" in below statement: In future, will bring into practice using ABC Report directly from the system as soon as all balances will match ...
3
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2answers
584 views

Future Pluperfect Tense

I was reading this question Future pluperfect and was really interested in how real is the Future Pluperfect tense. I found this information: This is from "The Future Pluperfect: Double Tenses in ...
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2answers
262 views

Is Canadian English considered more as American En or as British English?

Is Canadian English considered more as American English or as British English or neither? I always thought that there are only British English and American English but recently I realized that there ...
1
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1answer
158 views

Pronunciation of “vial”

According to my dictionary, the word vial should be pronounced /vaiəl/. But I've heard the pronunciation /faiəl/. Is that a mistake or merely a dialect?
0
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1answer
78 views

Does this pronunciation of “consent form” sound strange?

Does this sound wrong or just a different way of saying "consent form"? Almost like a dialect of some sort? https://soundcloud.com/sunshine-sunflower-ken
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9answers
14k views

How common is the usage of “yous” as a plural of “you”?

Yesterday I was exposed to the fact the "yous" is a plural form of the pronoun you. while historically I know that "you" is actually the second person plural pronoun while the singular form is "thou". ...
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1answer
72 views

What this person is saying in “American English” accent?

Video At 1:02: He says Human beings should be ..... from each other. Also a little bit confusion between 0:02 and 0:10. I believe it is: Went through .......
2
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2answers
644 views

The use of “how would you be knowing that?”

I ran into "how would you be knowing that?" when reading a novel. I did a search in Google Books. It seems to be a fairly productive use: “And how would you be knowing that?” “Billy's your brother ...
4
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1answer
29k views

Is “you was” correct to say?

I've always learnt at school that we have to say: "You were + (add something)" either if the "you" is actually one person or more. But sometimes I heard or read "You was + (add something)" especially ...
4
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2answers
565 views

But may be you might of heard tell 'bout the price on her head

Well, she ain't no John Wilkes Booth. But may be you might of heard tell 'bout the price on her head. This is a quote from QT's movie the Hateful Eight. I am aware that this is not supposed to be a ...
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1answer
2k views

Strange pronunciation of 'assume'

Today I heard in two (totally unrelated) videos the same unexpected pronunciation of the word 'assume' by native speakers. Googling came up with /əˈsjuːm/ both for English and American pronunciation (...
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2answers
99 views

We ain't lost, <tag question verb> we?

All, Other than ", are we", what are the other possible tag question verb forms below? We ain't lost, [tag question verb] We? What if the sentence was: We ain't seen anything like this before, ...
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2answers
715 views

What is a “tilly bird”?

I'm reading some 1948 strips from the comic "Pogo". In a dialogue I found the sentence "You gone whup the opposition like they is ol' tilly birds!" Easy-to-understand intentional mispronunciations ...
2
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2answers
8k views

Graham vs. Graeme

Scotish English is very strange (like some dialects of my language, Czech). It is not easy to read, speak or even understand it for foreign speakers, and also for (almost) native speaker (my teacher ...
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0answers
88 views

Is the word margarine used in as the same sense every English speaking country

I'd like to ask if the word margarine is used in as the same sense as the following in English speaking countries like the USA , the UK, Canada etc. Are there any other words which can be used to ...
2
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2answers
286 views

On omitting “to be”

I've (though rarely) more than once run into phrases where a usual "to be" happened to be omitted. For example: That needed done as soon as possible Whereas usually one (at least a non-native ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Using 'she don't care' in The Beatles' song 'Ticket to Ride' [duplicate]

She's got a ticket to ride, She's got a ticket to ride, She's got a ticket to ride, But she don't care. It sounded odd to me. So why is it used that way?
1
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1answer
508 views

How to get a native-like English style of speaking ? [closed]

So this might be a common question for non-native speakers, how to speak like English american natives ?! I've been using a podcast that is fairly good but it doesn't contain all various aspects of a ...
5
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1answer
251 views

-eer vowel (accent/dialect variation?)

Examples: hero, cheer, fear, searing, here, ... Most dictionaries will cough up /ɪə/ or even short I for this vowel. Unfortunately I cannot hear such a thing. Instead I hear /i/. I am a native ...
0
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1answer
112 views

Does “I be” mean both “am” and “was”?

I be traveling around the world. Does it mean "I am traveling around the world" and "I was traveling around the world"? Does it indicate both of them?
2
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1answer
207 views

A whole another?

Is "nother" a word? In the sentence: "A whole nother x". I have heard this said many times but now that I think about it, it doesn't really seem to be right. "A whole 'nother x" At the least I ...
3
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2answers
546 views

Meaning of “gran”

While reading Busman's honeymoon I have come across the following sentence said by Mrs. Ruddle who is a country woman of some sort (seems like she works as an occasional housekeeper) while she ...
3
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1answer
384 views

Pronunciations of “class” as found in Collins American English Dictionary

The Collins American English Dictionary gives class two pronunciations, presumably with respect to American English. Does this mean American English speakers use both equally and that both are okay?...
3
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1answer
3k views

May I use 'Good job, sir' to appreciate my boss' work?

Somewhat, I feel it down using this sentence to our seniors, especially our boss. Good job, sir Or...for that sake.. Well done, sir I need natives' input for this. If I'm working for you/under ...
1
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1answer
2k views

Meaning of “You not like me”

I was listening to the song "You not like me" by 50 cent. 50 uses the phrase in the hook many times, If you get shot and run to the cops you not like me You ain't got no work on the block, you ...
2
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3answers
2k views

What is the meaning of 'my mama done told me'?

In no way can I catch the meaning of 'My mama done told me'... ) It's from Katie Melua's cover of the song 'Blues in the night': My mamma done told me, when I was in pigtails, My mamma done ...
3
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1answer
1k views

“She would of been a good woman”

"She would of been a good woman," The Misfit said, "if it had been somebody there to shoot her every minute of her life." Source: A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery O'Connor This is an quote ...
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2answers
2k views

where do people say ON the weekend (geographically speaking)?

I've always been taught to say AT the weekend, not ON the weekend, but recently I've come across the following sentence: Clifton's very crowded ON the weekend. It makes me wonder where native ...
2
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1answer
187 views

What are the permissible things in the Yoda dialect?

I've found such a quote of Yoda: “Powerful you have become, the dark side I sense in you.” So, if I want to express my thoughts like him, will I be understood correctly by my clients if I, for ...
18
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7answers
5k views

What do you call this thing? “bag”?

I always need this when I buy stuff from the market. So, I need to know the real name for it. I always call it "bag" but it seems that it is not the correct name.
3
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2answers
533 views

How should proper nouns from another dialect be handled?

When creating something in formal English, how should proper nouns from another dialect be treated? For example, if you were writing in Australian English, how would you refer to the Centers for ...
3
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2answers
3k views

Is this correct: “Jon had gotten up early”?

I've decided to start a blog (for the first time). Ah! I forgot to tell why Jon had gotten up early. I've never used the word “gotten” nor have I seen anyone use it, but it seems that my usage of ...
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3answers
5k views

What is the purpose of using “don't” instead of “doesn't” in this phrase: “But she don't know you like I know you Slim” [duplicate]

I was listening to Eminem's song Stan. I noticed in one verse he says: But she don't know you like I know you Slim... At first I didn't believe my ears, but when I read out the lyrics I got ...