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Questions tagged [dialect]

This tag is for questions related to mutually intelligible variations within a language.

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3 votes
1 answer
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Should I spell proper nouns differently depending on the dialect I'm writing in?

I'm working on a text in British English. Should I use 'International Maritime Organization' or 'International Maritime Organisation'? Should proper nouns keep the original or can they be spelled ...
Ali E's user avatar
  • 865
1 vote
1 answer
142 views

"An a hundred millilitre bottle"

After searching online for some time, I still haven't found anything quite like my question (which probably indicates that I'm wrong). Even though English is my native language I just found out that I'...
David's user avatar
  • 13
0 votes
1 answer
108 views

What does "brought his chair on four legs" mean?

Pine Billy brought his chair down on four legs and spit in the fire and studied the logs a minute. What does the part in bold mean? The Education of Little Tree by Forest Carter There's more context ...
inviolable's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
36 views

Appending -ed to irregular verbs, obscure dialect? [closed]

Some examples (born->borned, saw->sawed): Interview with Celia Black, Tyler, Texas, October 11, 1974 (audio, transcript) Elmer Sparks (04:30): ...back when you were borned... Elmer Sparks (04:...
eight_ball's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

Public transport in the US

I have learned "public transport" is often used in the UK, while "public transportation" is mainly used in the US. References https://grammarist.com/usage/transport-transportation/...
dmjy's user avatar
  • 275
0 votes
2 answers
44 views

the painting was glazed

In the following passge, is "glazed" a US usage? The two young women from the campaign group Just Stop Oil threw the contents of two tins of Heinz tomato soup over the painting, which, the ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
0 votes
3 answers
80 views

baker's and barber's in British English

The Longman Dictionary says "baker's" and "barber's" could mean their respective establishments in British English. If so, is the following OK? There is a two-storey barber's ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
37 views

"besides" and "except for" in British English

Can "besides" and "except for" have the same meaning in the following in British English? The house is clean, besides/except for the kitchen.
Apollyon's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
219 views

"Black Cab Driver" sketch

Youtube link Hale and Pace. Scottish comedy duo. Sometimes even the locals don't get it when they do dialect, what shall poor German me say. Sometimes Czech subtitles help :-) The linked sketch is ...
Hauke Reddmann's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
148 views

Do native speakers pronounce "z" as or close to "s"?

Sometimes I hear English speakers pronounce "z" very close to "s" in some words. I wonder if it's common, from a dialect, mispronounced, or just I misheard it. For example, "...
ProtossShuttle's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
101 views

Is it normal to reverse the placement of (adjective/noun) with (subject + verb)?

I've seen this type of sentences in Harry Potter books. I've made these up, but I'm sure Rubeus Hagrid or whoever talks like this: Tiring, those blokes are. Such a great man, Dumblodre is. Why do ...
user516076's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
73 views

Perr/pɛr/ means peer/pɪə/, pair/peə/, or something else?

What do you mean by 'perr'/pɛr/? 'Peer'/pɪə/, pair/peə/ or something else? You know where that comes from? Is it a throaty pronunciation of the ‘r’ sound, characteristic of the Glaswegian accent of ...
cocteau's user avatar
  • 115
-3 votes
2 answers
41 views

Is the word "conjure" used as dialect?

Malcolm's team trying to keep Alliance from River: Simon: Did he say anything about a Miranda? Inara: What is that? Zoe: Don't know who or what, but it's on River's mind. Malcolm: Conjure it might be ...
Rhea K's user avatar
  • 415
2 votes
2 answers
203 views

Use of The Invariant Be

Recently the habitual be has gained wider recognition* among many English speakers as in Max and them boys are drinking way too much. (Montgomery and Mishoe 1999). (*Edit: By ''recognition,'' I do not ...
Jenny's user avatar
  • 51
-1 votes
1 answer
24 views

Is it natural to say 'non-standard dialects'? [closed]

Does 'non-standard dialects' sound normal(natural)? Aren't all dialects non-standard?
Platonique's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
787 views

What does "ter" mean?

I couldn't find the meaning of "ter" in any dictionaries. Here's the context: "What about that tea then, eh?" He said, rubbing his hands together. "I'd not say no ter summat ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,012
2 votes
1 answer
136 views

Omitting "to be": "I want left alone." versus "I want to be left alone."

I have been reading an internet serial for about a year, that is written by someone I believe to be a native or near-native English speaker (like myself), but I have noticed a recurring pattern of ...
flumperious's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
68 views

Up (with) the workers!

Here are a few questions about expressions like: Up (with) the workers!" Are they old-fashioned? Do they mean the same as "Viva . . ."? Could we say, e.g., "Viva the workers!&...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
1 vote
0 answers
79 views

Charlie Williams' bit about the Pygmie tribe

Would somebody be so kind to translate Yorkshire into English. Suppose the comedian is popular enough that a review will be appreciated by some: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7WucumXbAsk&t=240s (...
vectory's user avatar
  • 218
0 votes
1 answer
48 views

"whatever" as an adverb in American English

Is "whatever" in the following sentences correct in American English? I only saw such use in British dictionaries. a. He will finish the project by himself whatever. b. He will back us ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
738 views

When do we use "I says"?

In "A Jury of Her Peers" by Susan Glaspell, there is a usage of "I says" in several sentences. Is it a kind of talk of villagers or what? Two examples are: "I got up, with ...
Huseyin Kilic's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
101 views

Why did the writer write a singular verb after "they"?

From Alice's Adventures in Wonderland: 'Why, she,' said the Gryphon. 'It's all her fancy, that: they never executes nobody, you know. Come on!'
حفيد عمر ابن الخطاب's user avatar
20 votes
2 answers
7k views

'Me' vs 'my' [pronunciation] in British English

I noticed that British people sometimes use me instead of my. For example, Liam Gallagher does it quite often. Example: The wind was strong I have nearly lost me pants What is a story behind this ...
Untapped Soul's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
3k views

Supermarket (bill / check)

I need to know what you normally call these pieces of paper which you receive from cashier at any supermarket when you quit there: A) Bill B) Check With a simple search on the Internet you can ...
A-friend's user avatar
  • 14.3k
0 votes
1 answer
214 views

She don't love you no more! (Toy Story 3)

Why did Lotso say She don't love you no more! instead of "She doesn't love you anymore" in Toy Story 3? Does he speak unusual English?
I'mALittleBus's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
3k views

How to understand "No she bludgering well won't!"

"She's only Stunned," said Professor McGonagall impatiently, who had stooped down to examine Alecto. "She'll be perfectly all right." "No she bludgering well won't!" bellowed Amycus. "Not after ...
dan's user avatar
  • 13k
1 vote
1 answer
109 views

except for=but for in British English?

The following is taken from Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's English Dictionary, an American dictionary. I'd like to know whether it's also correct in British English. They would all have died ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
-1 votes
1 answer
817 views

grocery store in American English [closed]

Many dictionaries say "grocery store" means "supermarket" in American English. I'd like to verify if that's the case. Could this term refer to a shop that is not so big as a supermarket, somewhat like ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
-1 votes
1 answer
88 views

Does "off" mean "from" in this context?

In this report, the man said: Who's making the most money off the deal. Does off in this context mean from? and is this use common or just dialectal?
Norbert's user avatar
  • 853
1 vote
3 answers
56 views

American English - what is the most precise term for that kind of division? [closed]

Is it a dialect? Sub-dialect? Something else?
SunnySideDown's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
452 views

"I done [past verb]" or "I done [present verb]" grammar

So I came across these two weird sentences in some Hip-hop songs and I couldn't figure out in any way that what grammar they're following and the meanings were also really confusing for me. The first ...
Devin Hudson's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
440 views

Where does "day" sound like "die"?

I've seen that words like "day" sound like "die", "pray" sounds like "pry" and so on. I just googled where does day sound like die but didn't get anything. So, are day and die homephones in some ...
Pumpkin cake's user avatar
  • 1,005
2 votes
2 answers
270 views

Why did they use "didn't XXX nobody" rather than "anybody"?

https://newsday.co.tt/2018/11/29/suspect-i-didnt-kill-nobody/ Suspect: ‘I didn’t kill nobody’
Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,487
0 votes
1 answer
47 views

What is the difference between International English and other dialects of English? [closed]

What makes International English worthy of the "International" title, and not, say, British English, or American English?
CHARLES LEGATES's user avatar
31 votes
5 answers
10k views

What does "Scary-lookin' fing, inee" mean?

... Harry had never met a vampire, but he had seen pictures of them in his Defence Against the Dark Arts classes, and Black, with his waxy white skin, looked just like one. 'Scary-lookin' fing, ...
dan's user avatar
  • 13k
20 votes
5 answers
14k views

Why do the British use the word "flipping" for emphasis?

In the English (British) TV drama, Coronation Street, the word "flipping" is often used to stress a situation, so much so that it feels like a swear word to me to some degree: I've got a flipping ...
xpt's user avatar
  • 2,288
1 vote
1 answer
255 views

Is there another verb for "stitch someone up"? What is the American alternative for this verb?

Stitch someone up as in he is gonna stitch her up for the murder. Here is an entry from the Cambridge Dictionary: stitch sb up UK slang — phrasal verb with stitch uk ​ /stɪtʃ/ us ​ /stɪtʃ/ ...
Shivam's user avatar
  • 453
0 votes
1 answer
613 views

I would like to know when to use have and has in a sentence talking about a country

Jamaica has or have snakes? Which is correct? Explain
Tashania Reid's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
3k views

What does aye mean in Australia and New Zealand?

In my previous job I heard many Australian speakers using aye like sorry and pardon to ask for repeating what other person said. I also heard one kiwi guy using aye in the same way. But, now I work ...
user31782's user avatar
  • 1,763
5 votes
3 answers
6k views

Negative numbers: "minus" or "negative"?

I noticed that when negative number are used in speech, there are two dominant patterns. Taking "-10" as an example, in some cases it is pronounced "negative ten", while in others it is "minus ten". ...
laugh salutes Monica C's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
156 views

institution with a plural verb in British English

I'm wondering whether it's common for a subject referring to a business to go with a plural verb in British English. For example, would it be natural to say "QuickStart Inc. are planning to expand ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
2 votes
2 answers
726 views

What type of English uses the words/pronunciations "yer", "ter", "ernly", "der" and "don'"?

The words "yer", "ter", "ernly", "der" and so on, are they Irish? Also the way the contractions are contracted, "don't" to "don'". Hagrid ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
  • 25.1k
1 vote
1 answer
790 views

Is it ok to use "what's" instead of "what does"?

Actually is this construction common in NY English?
Trey's user avatar
  • 425
5 votes
2 answers
6k views

Usage of word "In future" or "In the future"

Is it correct to use the word "In Future" or "In the future" in below statement: In future, will bring into practice using ABC Report directly from the system as soon as all balances will match ...
Kareem Musa's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
3k views

Future Pluperfect Tense

I was reading this question Future pluperfect and was really interested in how real is the Future Pluperfect tense. I found this information: This is from "The Future Pluperfect: Double Tenses in ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
  • 25.1k
2 votes
2 answers
428 views

Is Canadian English considered more as American En or as British English?

Is Canadian English considered more as American English or as British English or neither? I always thought that there are only British English and American English but recently I realized that there ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
436 views

Pronunciation of "vial"

According to my dictionary, the word vial should be pronounced /vaiəl/. But I've heard the pronunciation /faiəl/. Is that a mistake or merely a dialect?
oz1cz's user avatar
  • 213
0 votes
1 answer
126 views

Does this pronunciation of "consent form" sound strange?

Does this sound wrong or just a different way of saying "consent form"? Almost like a dialect of some sort? https://soundcloud.com/sunshine-sunflower-ken
jaz's user avatar
  • 3
12 votes
9 answers
48k views

How common is the usage of "yous" as a plural of "you"?

Yesterday I was exposed to the fact the "yous" is a plural form of the pronoun you. while historically I know that "you" is actually the second person plural pronoun while the singular form is "thou". ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
91 views

What this person is saying in "American English" accent?

Video At 1:02: He says Human beings should be ..... from each other. Also a little bit confusion between 0:02 and 0:10. I believe it is: Went through .......
Anubhav's user avatar
  • 3,471