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Questions tagged [dictionaries]

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10 votes
3 answers
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If we can say "roomy jackets", can we say "a roomy shirt"?

collinsdictionary.com: If you describe a piece of clothing as roomy, you mean that you like it because it is large and fits loosely: roomy jackets On hinative.com two American English speakers said &...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
49 views

Difference between "reliable witness / source / data / information" and "dependable witness / source / data / information"

"Reliable" on britannica.com has two meanings: able to be trusted to do or provide what is needed; able to be depended on: ... able to be believed; likely to be true or correct: (1a) a ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
30 views

"The company receives millions of dollars in advertising revenue." — What specifically does "in" mean here?

britannica.com: (1) The company receives millions of dollars in advertising revenue. I can guess what, in (1), "in advertising revenue" means — it means "earning on advertising". ...
Loviii's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
94 views

Is it always necessary to use "the" before "youth" when it means "young people (considered as a group)"?

When "youth" means "young people considered as a group", oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com gives examples for this meaning both with "the" and without it. The examples where ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
167 views

What's the meaning of "the one to beat"?

source: "Merriam-Webster's Vocabulary Builder" (Second Edition) P586 nonpareil ... Critics seem to agree that this is the new nonpareil of video-game consoles, the one to beat.
Zhang Jian's user avatar
  • 1,073
0 votes
1 answer
77 views

Is it possible that the meanings of some words don't appear on the dictionary?

In just under two weeks, my first year at Yale will officially come to a close. It may be cliché, but it feels like just yesterday I walked through the gates of Morse College on an impossibly hot day ...
user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
84 views

Is 'Messi' Now a Recognized Word in Dictionaries? [closed]

I recently came across information stating that Lionel Messi's name has been incorporated into the Spanish dictionary as 'inmessionante.' This made me curious about how names and nouns related to ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
109 views

Symbols used in a dictionary

I came across this little bar located on lower part of a word in a dictionary, and I am wondering what it means. Unfortunately even my keyboard doesn't have the symbol so that I can show you. It looks ...
Afaq Nafar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
25 views

Stress of word 'flagrant' /ˈfleɪɡrənt/ is Flagrant or FLAgrant or something else?

Stress of word 'flagrant' /ˈfleɪɡrənt/ is Flagrant or FLAGrant or something else? My problem is I don't know stress at f (Flagrant) or fleɪ (FLAgrant) (separation of sounds, because as you seen, it is ...
Vy Do's user avatar
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8 votes
5 answers
4k views

'Rescuers had to wade waist-deep in floodwater.' Why not 'Rescuers had to wade in waist-deep floodwater.'?

Oxford's Collocations dictionary - 10th edition - for Android mobile app (licensed). wade verb ADVERB | PREPOSITION | PHRASES ADVERB slowly ashore The men waded ashore. across, back, out ...
Vy Do's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
60 views

Is "covered wagons rolling access the prairies" wrong?

I am using Oxford's Dictonary Advanced learner + Oxford's Collocations dictionary - 10th edition - mobile application (licensed). I seen In my thought, it is covered wagons are rolling access the ...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
0 votes
1 answer
138 views

What are the meanings of dot in word what show in Oxford Dictionary advanced learners for mobile?

What are the meanings of dot in word what show in Oxford Dictionary advanced learners for mobile (licensed subscription)? Example word: ability . Web version of Oxford dictionary for advanced ...
Vy Do's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
121 views

Why /ˈlem.ən/ (Cambridge dictionary - UK voice) but read like /ˈlemən/ (Oxford dictionary - UK voice)?

I am learning at English Pronunciation in Use - Advanced. I seen Why /ˈlem.ən/ (Cambridge dictionary - UK voice) but read like /ˈlemən/ (Oxford dictionary - UK voice)? I feel dot . in /ˈlem.ən/ was ...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
4 votes
1 answer
388 views

What's the meaning of "close call" in Collins Dictionary?

Source: There have been several close calls, but no one has been able to consummate a deal. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/consummate) As far as I know, "close call" ...
Zhang Jian's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
55 views

Reference for pronunciation of nicknames

Is there a reference for first names and surnames in English? I have lots of firstnames and surnames in my book (e.g. Juan, Sri, Elena, Robert and so on) but I don't know how to pronounce them in ...
mohamadi_arch's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
190 views

comma in definitions

I'm wondering if the comma is used in definitions to separate a component of a definition from an alternative to that component. This is often done in German dictionaries, but I am not sure how things ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
82 views

Why is "emerged" in "She emerged from the divorce a stronger person" marked only as intransitive but not as linking?

All dictionaries which mark their verbs with the labels: "transitive", "intransitive" and "linking", for some reason, don't write that the verb "emerge" has a ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
69 views

Is there a difference between adjectives which have their corresponding adverbs listed in the dictionary, and those that don't? [closed]

Sometimes, some authoritative dictionaries give us the adverb below its adjective, but sometimes, for instance penitential, there is no other adverb given. However, it seems like we need only to add -...
Narox's user avatar
  • 311
3 votes
1 answer
54 views

Title for the player that's trying to get others talking in " silence game"

I play the "silence game" with my kids, in which you win if you remain silent the longest, while a player is trying to get others talking. As we take turn playing; what term best describes ...
Nathaly Makhoul's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
64 views

"The meeting" denotes people or an event?

In the following sentence, does "the meeting" refer to an event or the people participating in the event? The meeting broke up at eleven o'clock. The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 6,006
0 votes
1 answer
54 views

How to understand the annotation "also"

I'm sometimes confused by notations from the dictionary. Simply put, I don't understand what it is trying to convey. Here is one example. 2.4 (also times) A portion of time in history or ...
ForOU's user avatar
  • 1,677
0 votes
1 answer
270 views

Abstract noun classification

Concrete nouns refer to material objects which we can see or touch. Abstract nouns refer to things which are not material objects, such as ideas, feelings and situations. https://dictionary.cambridge....
user09827's user avatar
  • 305
0 votes
0 answers
44 views

"Smash down on" when the meaning is not about a thing that breaks

I have some troubles with figuring out whether "smash down on" in the following sentences is the phrasal verb (smash down) or the regular verb "smash" + down on sth. A two-year-...
John V's user avatar
  • 1,655
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Inflections of the adverb 'well' (some senses are invariable)

Inflections of the adverb 'well' (Some senses are invariable) Better adv comparative ; best adv superlative https://www.wordreference.com/definition/well What does the dict. refer to by "Some ...
GJC's user avatar
  • 829
0 votes
2 answers
50 views

"Too much" before adjectives

You use much too in front of an adjective to say that something cannot be done or achieved because someone or something has too much of a quality. In sentences like these you put much in front of too,...
GJC's user avatar
  • 829
-1 votes
1 answer
63 views

Style of a entries in Longman dictionary? [closed]

I can not delineate the difference between formal, literary, and written styles of a verb in Longman dictionary. please look at the below picture.Note that the entries are four different words
Arash Salehi's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
92 views

ADVISE: "to offer advice to; counsel" vs. "to recommend; suggest"

The American Heritage dictionary's entry for advise reads To offer advice to; counsel: I advised him to study abroad; advised that we should reconsider the idea. How would you advise? To recommend; ...
GJC's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
37 views

He works in like manner with a beaver

LIKE (prep.) in like manner with: He works like a beaver. https://www.wordreference.com/definition/like Is then He works in like manner with a beaver grammatical ?
GJC's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
61 views

None (pronoun) : "not any" vs. "no part, nothing"

The entry of none distinguishes PRONOUN not any, as of something indicated: None of the pie is left. That is none of your business. no part; nothing: I'll have none of your backtalk! https://www....
GJC's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
51 views

"Each" (adverb): from each one

Each (adverb): to, from, or for each (one). https://www.wordreference.com/definition/Each However, I cannot come up with any example using the meaning "from". Is such a meaning grammatical? ...
GJC's user avatar
  • 829
9 votes
2 answers
242 views

"That's your only friend that I've ever met." Why is this an impossible sentence?

I read the following usage note in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language's entry for "of": Grammarians have sometimes condemned categorically the so-called double ...
joy2020's user avatar
  • 1,056
0 votes
1 answer
38 views

Resource for building higher-level vocabulary [closed]

A friend of mine grew up speaking basic English at home (living in a foreign country), but it was not more than that: basic. There are many words that he hears people say that he knows are not among ...
Sam's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

Can the dictionary definition have two different modifiers?

The following excerpt is the definition of ‘no’ no not any But, here’s a problem. Can ‘not’ modify determiner ‘any’? If not, does ‘any’ modify a noun, and ‘not’ modify a verb (that is, there are two ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
267 views

Confound - to make worse?

An American Heritage Dictionary definition I found in The Free Dictionary says about 'to confound': 3. To make (something bad) worse: Do not confound the problem by losing your temper. Some native ...
user1425's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
38 views

Definition of ‘In a row’

The following definition is what ‘in a row’ is defined as, in the Cambridge dictionary. In a row one after another without a break What does ‘without a break’ modify?
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
43 views

Don't word defintions need to be in one of five phrase types?

There are noun phrases, adjective phrases, adverb phrases, verb phrases, prepositional phrases. Word definitions don't need to be in one of five types?
user126927's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

What can be a possible reason for phonological changes in English?

I was reading this Wikipedia article. It is describing the major phonological changes in English over a period of time but no reason is given for any changes. Kindly correct me if I am wrong, the ...
Singh's user avatar
  • 453
0 votes
1 answer
68 views

Is there singular/plural list on the web?

Sometime it's necessary to determine if a word is singular or plural (to know which article to use or not to use). Is there some kind of dictionary that tells whether a word is singular or plural?
R S's user avatar
  • 219
1 vote
2 answers
52 views

Are these examples proper words & what defines one?

Narratively. Societally. They both get marked as wrong on Word and result in *No definitions found for this word. Try searching the web on google dictionary. They appear overall uncommon in use, so I ...
bluebell1's user avatar
  • 577
0 votes
1 answer
41 views

The US/British tag on Merriam-Webster [closed]

On the Definition of in school page of Merriam-Webster, the US tag is used. While the Definition of at school page uses the British tag. Does that kind of tag indicate where the item is being used? ...
JQQ's user avatar
  • 433
0 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is an entry in a dictionary?

I see the marketing on selling dictionaries "350,000 entries and meanings", I searched in the dictionary and I get An entry is: The description is too general, what is an item in a ...
Juan's user avatar
  • 77
1 vote
1 answer
71 views

the "QUITE" tag in Cambridge Dictionary

According to Cambridge Dictionary, fairly means "more than average, but less than very" while "quite" means "completely". I totally understand the definition of them, ...
JQQ's user avatar
  • 433
0 votes
2 answers
104 views

What meaning of FOR is used in "stumped for an answer", "lost for words", etc.?

What meaning of FOR in "stumped for an answer", "lost for words", etc. I've gone through the OED looking for the right meaning to no avail, as well as other major dictionaries. https://www.oed.com/...
GJC's user avatar
  • 829
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

the grammatical roles of "at most"

I just looked up "at (the) most" in "Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English". It was under the entry for "most" as determiner and/or pronoun. One of the example sentences for it in the dictionary ...
shapoor's user avatar
  • 719
1 vote
2 answers
102 views

Is there a way to not use bilingual dictionaries when I try to think in English?

Is there a way to not use bilingual dictionaries when I try to think in English? For the physical objects of the world (such as a rafter, a scraper, a condenser, etc.) I can use visual dictionaries. ...
Unknown User's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
63 views

Can I say: "This server is healthy." knowing that "server" is a material thing?

I was wondering, is it proper to say: "This server is healthy." knowing that "server" (https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/server) is a material thing? Thank you!
Charles Gaudreau Jackson's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
3k views

How do I understand Labels & Codes [ C or U ] in Cambridge dictionary correctly?

in Cambridge dictionary, [C] refers to Countable noun: a noun that has a plural [U] refers to Uncountable or singular noun: a noun that has no plural. What does [ C or U ] mean? Take this (...
WXJ96163's user avatar
  • 3,067
1 vote
1 answer
96 views

What is the relationship between the sub-items and the main one on Oxford Dictionary?

Oxford Dictionary (https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/just) gives a bunch of definitions about “just” there are 3 sub-items in 4th item, one of them is pointed out by blue rectangle in the ...
brennn's user avatar
  • 387
0 votes
0 answers
153 views

Verb/noun/adjective/adverb table

I'm looking for a resource in which I can look up for a verb, noun, adjective or adverb and get its corresponding verb, noun, adjective or adverb. Something like this, only much larger — this table ...
user105486's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
48 views

How to understand this definition sentence

arrogance:​the behaviour of a person when they feel that they are more important than other people, so that they are rude to them or do not consider them Oxford learner's dictionary I think the ...
ForOU's user avatar
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