Questions tagged [dictionaries]

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Abstract noun classification

Concrete nouns refer to material objects which we can see or touch. Abstract nouns refer to things which are not material objects, such as ideas, feelings and situations. https://dictionary.cambridge....
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25 views

"Smash down on" when the meaning is not about a thing that breaks

I have some troubles with figuring out whether "smash down on" in the following sentences is the phrasal verb (smash down) or the regular verb "smash" + down on sth. A two-year-...
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1answer
28 views

Inflections of the adverb 'well' (some senses are invariable)

Inflections of the adverb 'well' (Some senses are invariable) Better adv comparative ; best adv superlative https://www.wordreference.com/definition/well What does the dict. refer to by "Some ...
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2answers
30 views

"Too much" before adjectives

You use much too in front of an adjective to say that something cannot be done or achieved because someone or something has too much of a quality. In sentences like these you put much in front of too,...
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0answers
20 views

The one..., the other

The verb regard commonly appears in two combinations. The one phrase, "highly regarded", is a vague expression of praise; the other, "widely regarded as", usually... What Part of ...
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1answer
53 views

Style of a entries in Longman dictionary? [closed]

I can not delineate the difference between formal, literary, and written styles of a verb in Longman dictionary. please look at the below picture.Note that the entries are four different words
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28 views

ADVISE: "to offer advice to; counsel" vs. "to recommend; suggest"

The American Heritage dictionary's entry for advise reads To offer advice to; counsel: I advised him to study abroad; advised that we should reconsider the idea. How would you advise? To recommend; ...
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1answer
31 views

He works in like manner with a beaver

LIKE (prep.) in like manner with: He works like a beaver. https://www.wordreference.com/definition/like Is then He works in like manner with a beaver grammatical ?
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1answer
21 views

None (pronoun) : "not any" vs. "no part, nothing"

The entry of none distinguishes PRONOUN not any, as of something indicated: None of the pie is left. That is none of your business. no part; nothing: I'll have none of your backtalk! https://www....
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1answer
33 views

"Each" (adverb): from each one

Each (adverb): to, from, or for each (one). https://www.wordreference.com/definition/Each However, I cannot come up with any example using the meaning "from". Is such a meaning grammatical? ...
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1answer
23 views

Resource for building higher-level vocabulary

A friend of mine grew up speaking basic English at home (living in a foreign country), but it was not more than that: basic. There are many words that he hears people say that he knows are not among ...
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1answer
34 views

Can the dictionary definition have two different modifiers?

The following excerpt is the definition of ‘no’ no not any But, here’s a problem. Can ‘not’ modify determiner ‘any’? If not, does ‘any’ modify a noun, and ‘not’ modify a verb (that is, there are two ...
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2answers
156 views

Confound - to make worse?

An American Heritage Dictionary definition I found in The Free Dictionary says about 'to confound': 3. To make (something bad) worse: Do not confound the problem by losing your temper. Some native ...
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1answer
30 views

Definition of ‘In a row’

The following definition is what ‘in a row’ is defined as, in the Cambridge dictionary. In a row one after another without a break What does ‘without a break’ modify?
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Editions of Jones' Everyman's English pronouncing dictionary: Still Conservative RP?

I was thinking about buying an old Everyman's English pronouncing dictionary copy and I was wondering if the pronunciation is the same in all the editions (I have seen 18 different!). Eds. 1-13 should ...
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1answer
38 views

Don't word defintions need to be in one of five phrase types?

There are noun phrases, adjective phrases, adverb phrases, verb phrases, prepositional phrases. Word definitions don't need to be in one of five types?
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0answers
24 views

What can be a possible reason for phonological changes in English?

I was reading this Wikipedia article. It is describing the major phonological changes in English over a period of time but no reason is given for any changes. Kindly correct me if I am wrong, the ...
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1answer
36 views

Is there singular/plural list on the web?

Sometime it's necessary to determine if a word is singular or plural (to know which article to use or not to use). Is there some kind of dictionary that tells whether a word is singular or plural?
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2answers
40 views

Are these examples proper words & what defines one?

Narratively. Societally. They both get marked as wrong on Word and result in *No definitions found for this word. Try searching the web on google dictionary. They appear overall uncommon in use, so I ...
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1answer
38 views

The US/British tag on Merriam-Webster [closed]

On the Definition of in school page of Merriam-Webster, the US tag is used. While the Definition of at school page uses the British tag. Does that kind of tag indicate where the item is being used? ...
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2answers
523 views

What is an entry in a dictionary?

I see the marketing on selling dictionaries "350,000 entries and meanings", I searched in the dictionary and I get An entry is: The description is too general, what is an item in a ...
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1answer
33 views

the "QUITE" tag in Cambridge Dictionary

According to Cambridge Dictionary, fairly means "more than average, but less than very" while "quite" means "completely". I totally understand the definition of them, ...
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1answer
47 views

What meaning of FOR is used in "stumped for an answer", "lost for words", etc.?

What meaning of FOR in "stumped for an answer", "lost for words", etc. I've gone through the OED looking for the right meaning to no avail, as well as other major dictionaries. https://www.oed.com/...
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1answer
21 views

"Virtually" and wiktionary

I read Ordinary language, as most of us are at least vaguely aware, serves various functions in our day-to-day lives. The twentieth-century philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein thought the number of ...
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1answer
25 views

the grammatical roles of "at most"

I just looked up "at (the) most" in "Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English". It was under the entry for "most" as determiner and/or pronoun. One of the example sentences for it in the dictionary ...
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2answers
51 views

Is there a way to not use bilingual dictionaries when I try to think in English?

Is there a way to not use bilingual dictionaries when I try to think in English? For the physical objects of the world (such as a rafter, a scraper, a condenser, etc.) I can use visual dictionaries. ...
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1answer
28 views

Can I say: "This server is healthy." knowing that "server" is a material thing?

I was wondering, is it proper to say: "This server is healthy." knowing that "server" (https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/server) is a material thing? Thank you!
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4answers
1k views

How do I understand Labels & Codes [ C or U ] in Cambridge dictionary correctly?

in Cambridge dictionary, [C] refers to Countable noun: a noun that has a plural [U] refers to Uncountable or singular noun: a noun that has no plural. What does [ C or U ] mean? Take this (...
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1answer
62 views

What is the relationship between the sub-items and the main one on Oxford Dictionary?

Oxford Dictionary (https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/just) gives a bunch of definitions about “just” there are 3 sub-items in 4th item, one of them is pointed out by blue rectangle in the ...
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92 views

Verb/noun/adjective/adverb table

I'm looking for a resource in which I can look up for a verb, noun, adjective or adverb and get its corresponding verb, noun, adjective or adverb. Something like this, only much larger — this table ...
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1answer
41 views

How to understand this definition sentence

arrogance:​the behaviour of a person when they feel that they are more important than other people, so that they are rude to them or do not consider them Oxford learner's dictionary I think the ...
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1answer
240 views

how do you use merriam webster dictionary?

I have a problem using Merriam-Webster dictionary. I can't use it properly. For example, if we search for Cramped in Google it says uncomfortably small or restricted. But I can't find any meaning ...
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3answers
301 views

How to find proper phrasal verbs or idioms for the sentence you're translating?

Let's assume you're translating a sentence. You can translate everything in English but sometimes there are idioms and phrasal verbs that you can use to make your sentnce more clear and compact. e.g., ...
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1answer
174 views

Article or no article. The word "Stage"

How to understand whether it is necessary to put the article before this word and before other words like this? Dictionaries like this(enter link description here) don't give explanations or something ...
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1answer
80 views

What do you call a coined term like "Cobra effect"?

Looked on wiktionary: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cobra_effect and it just says it's a noun. How do you look for coined words on Wiktionary. I want to search for coined words instead of ordinary ...
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1answer
111 views

How pseudoantonyms or false antonyms in the English language can be identify? [closed]

Pseudoantonyms give the misleading impression that they have opposite meanings because of the prefixes. Are not these misleading for the non native English speakers and learners? How can we identify ...
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1answer
64 views

sentence from Cambridge dictionary: ‘his’ vs. ‘he'

Is this sentence from Cambridge dictionary correct? He was there and saw what happened, so his is the only authentic account. (from https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/...
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1answer
256 views

What are the dictionaries that shows the meaning of words from the common to the less common meaning?

What are the online dictionaries that shows the meaning of words from the most common to the less common meaning? Normally I use the following dictionaries: Cambridge dictionary Oxford dictionary ...
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1answer
729 views

What's "(oft) with poss"?

Both [with poss] and [oft with poss] are instructions in Collins Dictionary. I can understand "oft" = "often", but what is "poss"? The dictionary doesn't give an answer, at least I didn't ...
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1answer
62 views

What do these [Greek alphabet] forms in the OED signify?

I underlined them in red beneath. Screenshot:
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6answers
249 views

does stutter only refer to speech?

Can an action be stuttered? Or is it only referring to talking only? I see in the dictionary that it means to speak in such a way that the rhythm is interrupted by repetitions. What if an action is ...
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0answers
230 views

Is there a dictionary which denotes if its words are concrete or abstract nouns?

Is there a dictionary which denotes if its words are concrete or abstract nouns? I found already a dictionary which denotes if the words are countable or uncountable (Merriam Webster learner's) but I ...
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1answer
45 views

Online English dictionaries which group words with identical roots together

I am wondering whether there are out there online English dictionaries which group words with identical roots together to simplify learning. For example when I learn verb "subdue" it would be great ...
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1answer
80 views

When Americans hear a word he doesn't know, how they can find the word in a dictionary?

English is can be pronounced different way in many cases. I've been wondering how they can search the word at a dictionary? For example, if somebody heard the word "talk", it sounds like "tok" If he ...
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2answers
3k views

Is it wrong to hyphenate a phrasal verb like "log in" or is it a matter of style?

People log in to Facebook. In this sentence, if I change log in to log-in, will it be grammatically incorrect? Or the adding/omission of a hyphen is just a matter of style? The other thing is, if ...
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1answer
132 views

What does "This account may be true in itself" mean? [closed]

I don't understand what the sentence below say, please help me. in and of itself It is also put simply as in itself, as in: “This account may be true in itself.” Reference: http://www....
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1answer
545 views

The meaning of "view"

One in four of those questioned said they did not know nor had any view on the matter. What does view mean in the above sentence? Does it match the first sense or the second one in Oxford Learner's ...
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1answer
423 views

acreage - measured in acres or not?

I've encountered a contradiction in different dictionaries regarding the definition of acreage. Oxford Dictionary says An area of land, typically when used for agricultural purposes, but not ...
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2answers
151 views

Are there dictionaries which classify words by UK and USA usage?

Are there dictionaries which classify words by UK and USA usage? This question supposes that there are words which are mainly used in the UK while others are used in the USA. Based on that, there ...
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1answer
555 views

Why is "jewel-bright" not found in the dictionaries?

Why can I not find "jewel-bright" in the dictionaries? Is it a set phrase? The meaning is as bright as a jewel, isn't it? The context wherein I found it: Twenty minutes later, they left Eeylops ...