Questions tagged [difference]

This tag is for questions about the difference in meaning between certain phrases or sentences.

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30 views

What is the difference in meaning between “I wish” and “I am wishing”?

As this article says wish can be used in informal speech in the continuous tense, which was done in the 15th episode of the 5th season of the TV show Friends. Here is the excerpt: Monica: (kneels ...
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1answer
30 views

Difference between unspecified and undetermined?

My mother language is Farsi (Persian) and in my language "Unspecified" and "Undetermined" have exactly the same meaning. I did a little search and what i found is as follows: Unspecified means "Known ...
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0answers
14 views

Much vs Very usage differences

I was much exhausted in the evening. (Here very exhausted is wrong) She is very tired after a day’s work. (Here much tired is wrong) My grammar book said above sentences. Although the kind of ...
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1answer
12 views

Long-lasting or Long-standing

My feeling so far is that "long-lasting" is more relevant when something that has a non-homogeneous, "dynamic" nature is distributed on the timeline, e.g. "long-lasting drop in sales", "long-lasting ...
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1answer
13 views
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1answer
42 views

Is it true that the word “some” can mean two things?

Let's take the sentence "I ate some meat" for example. Am I correct thinking that it can mean two things, either "I ate some amount of meat", or "I ate some kind of meat, don't know which exactly it ...
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1answer
30 views

Correct contraction with to be (not)

If I say: You are not Julie, what is the correct contraction? You're not Julie You aren't Julie
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1answer
32 views

The difference between “Who did you help?” and “Who helped you?”

QUESTIONS WITHOUT THE QUESTION FORM.. When asking a question in English, we do not always use the question form. However, this is only when a question word, such as “who“, “what“ or “which“, is the ...
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17 views

“such a lot of friends”

What's up with that phrase "such a lot of friends", "such a lot of money" etc First of all, I've never heard it before, not in 30 years. Second of all, why isn't it "so a lot of friends" (sounds ...
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1answer
13 views

Is there any difference in meaning between “come”, “come over” and “come along” in the sense of arriving at a place?

Is there any difference in meaning between come, come over and come along in the sense of arriving at a place? For example: I didn't expect you to show up at my party. Thanks for coming. I ...
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1answer
12 views

Is there any difference in meaning and usage between the phrase “on one's part” and “for one's part”?

Is there any difference in meaning and usage between the phrase on one's part and for one's part in the sense of something being done by someone or experienced? For example: There were a few ...
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1answer
21 views

see or know some one for first time?

I have a problem with finding correct verb. for example when you read about a writer for first time, or when you watch a movie and see an actor for first time, which verb we should to use in this ...
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1answer
32 views

Difference between “begin” and “start”

I have a gap-fill exercise in which begin and start are given: _By the time I got to the cinema, the film (1)____. _ As soon as they (2)_____ to explain, other people told at them to be quiet. ...
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16 views

Do I am going to watch and I am watching have the same meaning?

I would like to know if this two sentences below have the same meaning or not. I am watching a movie tomorrow. I am going to watch a movie tomorrow.
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1answer
19 views

Is there any difference between “miss out” and “lose out”?

Could you tell me if there is any difference between miss out and lose out? If you don't take the course, you will miss out a lot. If you don't take the course, you will lose out a lot.
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1answer
18 views

Is “to choose” right in this sentence?

I've got a sentence from a friend: There has been an increasing number of people to choose to use cell phones in daily life. Is the sentence grammatically right? Why is it "to choose" instead ...
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0answers
18 views

What does “doorsill” mean in this context?

" Montag froze. He saw Mildred thrust herself back to the wall and gasp. "Someone--the door--why doesn't the door-voice tell us--" "I shut it off." Under the doorsill, a slow, probing sniff, an ...
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2answers
45 views

“You know how” vs. “you know that” in context

Could you tell me what is the difference in meaning between the following sentences? Rach, y'know-y'know how Emily's coming right? Rach, y'know-y'know that Emily's coming right? By the way, ...
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1answer
42 views

“Unbelief” or “disbelief”

If someone believes in God but rejects His words or orders or speaks some blasphemous words, is it called "unbelief" or "disbelief"?
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1answer
23 views

How do you describe this situation? Does “overlapping” mean exactly the same as “coinciding”?

Consider you have two lines are very close to each other, but they are not as if one line is 100 percent exactly on the other line. In other words, suppose that we have picture and if zoom in and zoom ...
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0answers
17 views

What is the difference between aggravate and exacerbate? [closed]

According to the dictionaries I have checked (eg Cambridge), both of these terms mean to make something, such as a situation or disease, worse, but what's the difference?
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2answers
24 views

Is there any difference in meaning or usage between “four weeks from today” and “in four weeks”? [duplicate]

Could you tell me if there is any difference in meaning or usage between "four week from today" and "in four weeks"? For example: What are you guys doing four weeks from today? What are you ...
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0answers
11 views

Is there any difference between the phrase “how is it going?” and “how is it coming?”?

Could you tell if there if there is any difference between how is something going? and how is something coming? when asking how something is progressing? For example: How is your assignment going? ...
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1answer
17 views

Intense and intensive about drinking?

"He's on the fifth drink or something since we got here. It looks pretty intense/intensive. Maybe we should go talk to him." Could both "intense" and "intensive" be used here naturally? Do they ...
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1answer
20 views

using of delay vs late in proper place [closed]

Which one is mostly used by native English speakers? The train is delayed or The train is late
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1answer
40 views

Distinguishing of and from

I always thought that the difference between "of" and "from" was very clear to me generally speaking, but after discussing with an English learning friend I realized that my understanding may be ...
2
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1answer
33 views

“Drop by” or “Drop in” [duplicate]

Do you know the cafe down the street? I always go there after work. You should drop by/in someday. Can both "by" and "in" be used here? Is there a difference between them? Which one is more natural?
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5answers
91 views

Difference between “idiot” and “dummy”?

I think "idiot" and "dummy" have the same meaning and they both mean someone stupid. But I came across this sentence, "I might be an idiot, but I'm no dummy." and now I'm wondering what's the ...
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1answer
35 views

What is the difference between below/above and over/under?

I would like to know the difference between above and over when these words mean "more than" and the differnce between between below and under when these words mean "less than". Are some difference ...
2
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1answer
46 views

I don't understand that sentence, even though I know conditionals well

"If David didn't give up smoking, Liza wouldn't marry him." I only can see that sentence in the 3rd conditional (unreal past) - "If David hadn't given up smoking, Liza wouldn't have married him". But ...
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0answers
14 views

What are the difference between “be about to do something” and “be going to do something”?

Often these phrases are translated similarly. In which situation "be about to do something" more preferred? If I have the right understanding, this turnover is used then something will happen soon. ...
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0answers
17 views

“next time you do something” vs. “for next time you do something”

Could you tell me if there is any difference in meaning between the following sentences? Next time you go to a job interview, take your resume. For next time you go to a job interview, take ...
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0answers
11 views

Are “be” and “get” interchangeable here?

I do like the job, but sometimes it can get/be a bit depressing listening to all the heart wrenching stories all day. Are "be" and "get" interchangeable here?
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0answers
20 views

Is there any difference between the terms 'define' and 'qualify'?

I have looked up their etymologies but cannot come to a nuanced demarcation between the terms. I know both generally imply limiting of a concept; in the case of 'qualify', extending to general ...
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1answer
16 views

What the difference between “bristly” and “briery”

I don't understand the difference between these words. Whats does mean each word? In whats cases, can I use each word? I saw these words in Google Translate, Collins, Lexico. Google Translate - ...
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1answer
17 views

Why does it put “or” instead of “,” in this example? Difference in meaning?

Why does it put "or" instead of "," in the following example? https://7esl.com/verbs/ 1)"or" sentence: Noun refers to the words or pharses that represent a person, a place, a thing or activity, or a ...
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1answer
26 views

“used to” vs “would”

The book "Freakonomics", Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner, 2005, page 186, the link (the original is with "would"): So how does it matter if you have a very white name or a very black name? ...
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1answer
42 views

a chocolate vs some chocolate

Would you like a chocolate? (If I offer to taste one chocolate from a box.) Would you like some chocolate? (If I offer to taste a bar of chocolate.) Is it correct?
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2answers
41 views

“Bill doesn’t run or swim.”

Bill doesn’t run or swim. Bill doesn’t run and doesn’t swim. What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences?
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1answer
38 views

“someday” Vs “some day”

You should come by some day. You should come by someday. Is there a difference between these? Are both technically correct?
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0answers
16 views

“Others” or “other things”?

I know 'others' is an indefinite pronoun. It may refer to things, only when the things already mentioned have been specifically defined : "The mangoes that you gave me and others (= other mangoes) ...
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1answer
24 views

“economic future” vs. “future economy”

Consider these The high-tech industry does matter to our economic future. The high-tech industry does matter to our future economy. Do they mean the same thing? Are they both correct?
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0answers
11 views

Using (probability / likelihood) and (probable / likely) [closed]

Could someone please tell me whether all the following choices sound idiomatic in my made-up example? If some of them are not natural, then please let me know the reason? Unfortunately, the doctors ...
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1answer
20 views

How much is the (probability / likelihood) of something?

How do you normally ask about the probability / likelihood of something in English? Example: The number of artificial satellites is increasing and the gravitational force is acting up on them. But ...
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1answer
39 views

“You are next” vs “It is your turn”. Do they have the same meaning?

You are next. It is your turn. These sentences seem to have the same meaning. Is there any difference?
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0answers
7 views

“How far” Vs “How far away”

I wonder which sentence in each pair below is not grammatically and idiomatically correct and why? Scenario 1: Imagine two people are driving toward New York city. One of them who has never been in ...
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1answer
20 views

What is the difference between I had been and I was? [closed]

I would like to know the difference between I had been and I was, in these two examples. I had been a teacher for years but now I am a writer. I was a teacher for years but now I am a writer. If ...
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0answers
9 views

Difference between correspondence and relationship or association

As per longman Dictionary "correspondence" devotes: a relationship or connection between two or more ideas or facts So now I wonder whether we can use it interchangeably instead of association and ...
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0answers
18 views

Should it be “it is threatened” or “these are threatened” in this sentence

India has always professed its desire to have friendly relations with all countries but has been equally firm in safeguarding its interests when it is threatened. I think the above sentence is ...
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2answers
2k views

Supermarket (bill / check)

I need to know what you normally call these pieces of paper which you receive from cashier at any supermarket when you quit there: A) Bill B) Check With a simple search on the Internet you can ...

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