Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 174 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
Join us in building a kind, collaborative learning community via our updated Code of Conduct.

This tag is for questions about the difference in meaning between certain phrases or sentences.

0
votes
1answer
27 views

Unreal uses of past tenses “Would you rather we took the bus?” vs “Would you rather take the bus?”

Do you want to take the bus or would you rather ______ the bus? (Choose TWO correct answers) a. to take b. take ✔ c. we take ✘ d. we took ✔ I found this in an online test ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Unreal uses of past tenses “if only+simple past” vs “if only+past perfect”

If only I knew the answer! What's the difference between simple past and past perfect in unreal uses of past tenses? ● What's the difference between these two sentences? If only you didn't ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

'check up on' vs 'check on', is there a difference?

Entries for these phrasal verbs are almost identical in different dictionaries. Is there a difference in meaning or no? Is there a nuance that users should be mindful of? Check on sb/sth: https://...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

As (Much) Instructive As Humorous

I have a question about the following sentence (from page 174 of the book "Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion" by Robert Cialdini): "Although designed for a laugh, the remark is as much ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Nuance of infinitive phrase `to stand watch` in the sentence

In the movie "The Hobbit", Erlond tells Gandalf: You are not the only guardian to stand watch over Middle-earth. I'm not sure if there's any nuance with the use of the form to stand watch. If I ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

What's the difference among these sentences in meaning?

Look at these below sentences: Rain falling on the roof is making a noise. Rain falling on the roof makes a noise. Rain falls on the roof is making a noise. Rain falls on the roof makes a noise. ...
0
votes
2answers
31 views

What is the difference between both the sentences? [closed]

Say "I love you" Say you love me what's the difference between these two sentences?
3
votes
1answer
55 views

(“In … terms” structure) What should be in the blank space? A noun or an adjective or something else?

(In _____ terms, ...) What should be in the blank space? A noun or an adjective or something else? If we can use both of them, what is the difference, if any? He's really tight-fisted, I ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

1.You may ask: “What does it mean?” , 2.“What does it mean?” you may ask. Which one is correct?

1.You may ask: "What does it mean?" 2."What does it mean?" you may ask. ● Which one is correct? ● Is the usage of the "s correct? ● What's the difference between them, if any? ● What about ...
1
vote
2answers
38 views

Which one is more natural? What's the differnece in meaning?

● Which one is more natural? ● What's the differnece in meaning? ● Which sentence would you prefer to be used in an informal conversation? 1.You know what does cardiac mean, From what I can ...
0
votes
2answers
47 views

I never knew + present simple

We can use this sentence "I never knew you liked dogs" . But I dont get it why do not we use " I never knew you like dogs " instead of the first sentence.
1
vote
1answer
26 views

What's the difference between seem & appear in this sentence?

What's the difference between seem & appear in this sentence? It appears/seems that the man had been murdered. Are there any specific structures for using these verbs?
0
votes
1answer
24 views

How can I raise the possibilty here?

● How can I raise the possibilty here(after "I mean")? I decided to choose an interesting subject, I mean a topic that you are really interesed in. ● What’s the correct procedure in cases like ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Work on (doing) something and work at (doing) something

What's the difference between work on and work at, and what's the right way to use them? We're working on/ at our relationship. I need to work on/at my German- it's getting rusty. We're working on/...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

What is the difference between “on one's own”, “by oneself” and “oneself”? [duplicate]

Here is the context: I bet you won’t be able to do up the bathroom yourself. I am glad that now you can make coffee yourself. (I saw the first sentence in a book and wrote the second one.) ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

What is the difference between “I am always busy” and “I have always been busy”?

Here is the question: Someone says: "Anyhow, I'd never have time to watch it." Which of the following choice could be correctly added to the sentence? A) because I was always busy ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

'red' vs 'that are red'

What is the difference between: lines that are red are representing (...) vs. red lines are representing (...) and lines that start with the letter A (...) vs. lines starting with ...
0
votes
2answers
29 views

What is the difference between “high-pitched” and “high-pitch”

I have noticed many compound adjectives with an "ed" ending, such as "snowed-under" or "three-legged". It looks a bit weird since I have also saw words like "high-price" and "high-quality" in some ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

“But that if you do that” or “But if you do that” Which one is more common in written English?

Note: The text of this question changed after two of the answers were provided. If reviewing those answers, be sure to review their EDIT sections, as they initially start off by replying to different ...
2
votes
4answers
55 views

“touch and go” vs. “hit and miss”

I am trying to understand the difference between these two phrases touch and go hit and miss Both apparently mean something like "almost certain to succeed", or "nearly a given", but there's some ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

How to pronounce “z” or “v” sounds at the end of a word properly?

I have a hard time practicing words like "was", "have" and even "haves". I used to pronounce all of them with a "s" or "f" ending, which is incorrect for sure. Now I have known they should be voiced, ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

Tooth brushing Vs. Tooth cleaning

I saw in the book "essential grammar in use" (Cambridge publishing) the following sentence: I cleaned my teeth three times a week. Is it talking about brushing teeth? I'm not sure about that ...
4
votes
3answers
575 views

“Mental state” vs. “mental status”

What is the difference between mental state and mental status? For example: The evaluation/diagnosis was based on my mental state (status?) Google and Wikipedia appear to suggest both terms are ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

oral instructions vs verbal instructions

I was given an assignment to correct any mistakes in some given sentences. I saw no real mistake in the sentence below: Preparing to parachute from the airplane, Cameron received verbal ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

“There has had” vs “There has been”

Can I say: There has had... instead of There has been... Can you explain to me the difference between both?
0
votes
1answer
33 views

meaning - top of the mountain or summit

In an everyday situation to address the very top of a mountain is better to say: at the top of the mountain Or at the summit of the mountain And again what's the difference between the two? In ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

'What are you?' vs. 'What do you do?'

What is the difference between 'What are you?' and 'What do you do?' in the job meaning? How to sense this difference if I need to ask about profession?
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Meaning in context: 'I was' or 'I have been'

What is correct in this context? 'Have you ever been to Italy?' ->'Yes, I was last year.' OR ->'Yes, I have been last year.' THX
0
votes
1answer
29 views

difference between “hold something” and “hold with someting” in context

I heard a person say this: I can do this exercise, but I must admit it is pretty difficult to hold with this weight. Would the sentence have the same meaning if the person dropped the word with?
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Difference “all night” vs “all night long” in meaning

Is there any practical difference between? We were working all night We were working all night long
0
votes
1answer
35 views

“The hundred years” or “the one hundred years”?

The hundred years after Euler represented a period in which functions not satisfying his "official" constraints were frequently smuggled into mathematics through fudgy considerations involving ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Is “patent claims drafting” correct?

Which is the correct wording? patent claims drafting or drafting patent claims For example: A: Drafting patent claims is a difficult task. B: Patent claims drafting is a difficult task....
0
votes
2answers
91 views

Difference between `Must` and `Must be` in a sentence

Which one of these lines is correct? After close browser, session must be expire. and After close browser, session must expire. Actually, what's the difference between the usage of Must be and ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

What is the difference between: You will be waiting for them at the hotel OR You are going to be waiting for them at the hotel

I saw on the site it says that there's a little difference in meaning between Future Continuous and this structure 'be going to be +ing'.
0
votes
1answer
32 views

“Our mind liking” or “our mind's liking”?

Tell me please whiche sentence is correct. Our mind liking to reduce most of what we have been through to headings than to full stories is not a very good thing. Our mind's liking to reduce ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

“thought of” vs “was thinking of”

After she underwent her very first breakup she thought of suicide. and After she underwent her very first breakup she was thinking of suicide. What's the difference between thought of and was ...
4
votes
3answers
676 views

Confusion about the U.S after secondary level educational system's words

When I am practicing listening, particularly when it comes to university stuff, I'm getting a bit confused how to use the words appropriately. Items are below. Undergraduate "Mostly" meaning to ...
1
vote
2answers
103 views

Should I write “DNA is” or “DNA are”?

When I'am writing a paper, I did not know what is the difference between "is" and "are". Should I write: "DNA is a part of....." instead of: "DNA are a part of....." ?
2
votes
1answer
107 views

Is “There will be no” valid in meaning of “There will not be”?

Yesterday I got a message that "There will be no introduction lecture" Now, I'm not sure if it's a mistake or it's another grammatical way to say "There will not be a lecture". If they are ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

What is the difference between “The city has parks” and “There are parks in the city”?

What is the difference between "The city has parks." and "There are parks in the city."? (Another example: The city has a lot of people. Vs. There are a lot of people in the city.) They are just ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Difference between “I'm sorry (that) S+V” and “I'm sad (that) S+V”

I don"t know the difference between "I'm sorry (that) S+V" and "I'm sad (that) S+V". For example, I'm sorry I went. I'm sad I went. I'm sorry you're not going to come. I'm sad you're not going to ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

question about two sentences in present perfect form

They are coming after they have had dinner. They are coming after they have eaten their dinner. what is the difference between the two sentences and when we use each one of then
3
votes
1answer
39 views

“Farm policy” or “farming policy”? Is it an AmE/BrE thing?

In the USA, demand for corn to fuel ethanol plants has boosted prices, and federal farm policies designed for an era of grain surpluses have kept millions of acres of farmland fallow. (USA Today) ...
2
votes
2answers
39 views

Are these three phrases identical in meaning?

Watch out for Look out for (be on the lookout for) Keep an eye out for I'm interested in whether these phrases have identical meaning or whether they are different. From most that I've found out, all ...
5
votes
4answers
756 views

Concede vs admit

I wonder if there any nuance between the two sentences. I admit that you are right. I concede that you are right. I believe there is a slight difference between them. Do both sentences suggest that ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

You gonna vs You're gonna

I'm writting some informal texts with some slangs, and I've been wondering if I should put "are" after "you" in some of them, of if without this it's okay: 1- "You gonna lose that key." or "You're ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Wish+would/past simple

How do I use the verb " wish " correctly? When do I use with+would and when do I use wish+past simple? Is there any rule? I hope you can also give me a few examples. Thanks in advance.
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Come around vs come here

To me it seems like come around mean come anywhere near to me in any direction, that is behind me, right in front of me, sideways etc. On the other hand, come here seems to imply to come at a specific ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Going to vs to go to

Don't you need to go to the bus stop? Don't you need going to the bus stop? Which of the sentences above is more informal or common to use? I think they mean the same, but the second phrase is ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

What is the difference between the words “over” and “here”?

I've noticed that sometimes English speakers use over similar to here, e.g. once me and my friend saw a girl walking he said call her over -- here it seems like he meant call her here. In another ...