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Questions tagged [difference]

This tag is for questions about the difference in meaning between certain words, phrases, or sentences.

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Difference between 'anyone' and 'everyone'

I came across a dialogue today: Speaker A: You see, that house isn't just for music majors. It's for anyone who's interested in music. Speaker B: But isn't that everyone? What does speaker B refer ...
kokomi's user avatar
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4 votes
4 answers
916 views

"I didn’t see her again (until) a few days afterwards." — How does "until" affect the meaning of the sentence?

an example from a dictionary (I couldn't find its source now): (1) I didn’t see her again until a few days afterwards. my variant: (2) I didn’t see her again a few days afterwards. How does "...
Loviii's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
29 views

Would have been vs Will have been

In the grammar book that I'm currently studying, the text differentiates these two expressions quite definitively: "would have been" refers to an event that did not happen "will have ...
economics's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
25 views

It teaches you what you shouldn’t be doing in the real world

It teaches you what you shouldn’t be doing in the real world. Does this sentence say that It teaches you [something] => sort of learning for the real world / similar to "it teaches you how to ...
hwkal's user avatar
  • 487
3 votes
2 answers
47 views

Is there any nuance between "wildflower" and "wild flower"?

I checked dictionaries and tried googling but didn't get any useful answer. Are they just like "ice cream" and "ice-cream" where there is no difference in meaning at all? Or is ...
Betty's user avatar
  • 149
9 votes
7 answers
2k views

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

I speak to my little son in English. In my native language we have got many words of endearment which mean a child who misbehaves in a playful way. I am interested what words/phrases native speakers ...
Kate's user avatar
  • 101
8 votes
1 answer
708 views

Is there any difference between a heavy meal and a large meal, between a light meal and a small meal?

Cambridge.org says "a heavy meal = a large meal" and "a light meal = a small meal". Is this really so? the definition of "light meal" from collinsdictionary.com: "A ...
Loviii's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
43 views

What is the difference between a final draft and a final version?

Am I right that: Since a draft is a rough version, then a final draft is a final rough version. That means a final draft implies you will submit it to someone and he may not approve it and ask to work ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
23 views

Usage of In ,for and within

I want to understand clearly. I saw my friend two years ago and I still remember that he was short. But, right now he has become tall. Within two years, he has grown taller. I want to express that ...
Thamilay's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
573 views

"The sight of her rendered him speechless." — Why place "her" after nouns? Why not say just "Her sight rendered him speechless."?

britannica.com: (1) The sight of her rendered him speechless. "Of her" looks rather strange to me. I would have expected to see something like: (2) Her sight rendered him speechless. So, why ...
Loviii's user avatar
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3 answers
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He had problems reading without glasses. In the above sentence is 'reading' a present participle or a gerund in this sentence

He had problems reading without glasses. In the above sentence is 'reading' a present participle or a gerund in this sentence.can anyone explain, please 🙏
Erica Gogoi's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
88 views

"beg, plead, entreat, implore, beseech, appeal" What is the different and when to use

Here is what I researched, is the meaning correct, and when to use Please help me 1. Beg ask for help, mercy, or forgiveness. sometimes carry a connotation of weakness or dependency. 2. Plead ask ...
Liap's user avatar
  • 69
3 votes
2 answers
45 views

Does the verb "to wear someone down/out" mean far more tiredness than the adjective "wearisome"?

My understanding I formed from dictionaries is the following: to wear someone down/out = to make someone feel extremely tired wearisome = making someone feel tired or bored Hence, despite the same ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
20 views

difference between [worked at A warehouse and A manufacturing plant] vs [worked at A warehouse and A manufacturing plant]

(1) I have worked at a warehouse and a manufacturing plant before. (2) I have worked at a warehouse and manufacturing plant before. The first sentence has two indefinite articles and the second one ...
ansonman's user avatar
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2 answers
34 views

This is our first /the first test this term

This is our first test this term. This is our the first test this term. Which one is right?Shouldn’t we put the in front of first? And why?
Ella Zhang's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
33 views

Would you say "I would like to express my worries ON/IN or ABOUT"?

I know ABOUT is way more common but could you also use: ON? I asked ChatGPT (sorry) this same question and it gave me the following answer: "I would like to express my worries on the current ...
Daniel Costa González's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
1k views

Are "unloaded" and "not loaded" interchangeable?

I had the impression that not loaded and unloaded had different meanings: not loaded: has never been loaded, or is currently not loaded unloaded: has been loaded at least once, and then the load has ...
anol's user avatar
  • 347
2 votes
1 answer
22 views

"They ventured nervously into the water." & "He nervously ventured out onto the ice."— Difference between "ventured nervously" & "nervously ventured"?

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) They ventured nervously into the water. my variant: (2) They nervously ventured into the water. What's the difference between (1) and (2)? britannica.com: (3) He ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
92 views

Cut off and cutoff/cut-off

From my understanding: cut off is a verb and cutoff or cut-off is a noun. Am I right? Or is the BBC right? Can "cut off" also be a noun? I am confused because of the following sentences ...
E.V.'s user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
48 views

Is it always necessary to use "the" before "youth" when it means "young people (considered as a group)"?

When "youth" means "young people considered as a group", oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com gives examples for this meaning both with "the" and without it. The examples where ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,282
4 votes
1 answer
126 views

Why do they use 'persons' rather than 'people' here?

One entry of Merriam-Webster's definitions of 'follow-up' as an adjective is: done, conducted, or administered in the course of following up persons. Why do they use 'persons' rather than 'people' ...
Michael's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
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Difference between search online and online search

Is there any difference between search online or online search or is only one of them correct? Example sentence He's been doing a search online for a while.
banan3'14's user avatar
  • 379
2 votes
2 answers
30 views

Should we continue to think about the project advantages?

Is this sentence correct: Should we continue to think about the project advantages? Duolingo prefers Should we continue to think about the advantages of the project?. Are those not equivalent? What ...
banan3'14's user avatar
  • 379
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Past simple tense

He told me that the meeting was in the hall before I had even framed the question. Could I change above explanation as follow He told me that the meeting was in the hall before I even framed the ...
Thamilay's user avatar
  • 197
1 vote
1 answer
132 views

Conditional sentences and usages

If I were born in 1984 my name would have been thamilay. If I were born in 1984 my name would be thamilay now. Which sentence is wrong. Correct me!
Thamilay's user avatar
  • 197
1 vote
1 answer
38 views

'But then', 'but then again', 'then again' - same as 'although'?

I am confused about those but then, but then again and then again. Can I use them interchangeably? What I understand is those are similar as although. Can I use them as although when I translate ...
Thamilay's user avatar
  • 197
1 vote
3 answers
38 views

"How interruptions are going to be handled?" versus "How are interruptions going to be handled?"

Are How interruptions are going to be handled? and How are interruptions going to be handled? both correct? If yes, then is there a difference in meaning? What form is used more often and in what ...
bansheenocturno's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
37 views

It suits me more OR It suits me better

When speaking about features of character, which form is correct? smiling suits her more being a bit drunk suits him better
Jury Akhmylov's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
82 views

"I was waiting at the airport when who should come along but Mr Pettigrew!" — What does this mean? What if we replace "who" with "someone"?

a sentence from the section "More examples" from cambridge.org: (1) I was waiting at the airport when who should come along but Mr Pettigrew! What does "when who should come along but ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,282
2 votes
1 answer
81 views

What is the difference in meaning between "offer" and "offering" when used as nouns in business situations?

Can you please tell what is the difference in meaning between offer and offering when used as nouns in business? We might find a good offer/offering at Progressive. I've tried to find an explanation ...
Dmytro O'Hope's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
45 views

Typing vs writing on a computer keyboard

I see the terms “type” and “write” used to describe putting text into a computer using a keyboard. What is the difference between them? Examples: “typing a document” “typing on a typewriter” “writing ...
matj1's user avatar
  • 135
0 votes
1 answer
36 views

"The government <withdrew> <recalled> its diplomats from the capital." — Are "withdrew" and "recalled" synonyms here?

I'd like to understand in what cases the meanings of the phrases "to withdraw someone" and "to recall someone" overlap. For this purpose I prepared some examples from dictionaries. ...
Loviii's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
70 views

Can I use the phrase “Something survives us”, and if I can, could it have two meanings?

One day, when the human species will have disappeared, Nature will have shown that she, in fact, survives us. I believe I can use this phrasing to mean both; That nature survives/lives longer than ...
Mertle8's user avatar
  • 49
0 votes
1 answer
163 views

Jobseeker vs job seeker – is there a difference in meaning?

Online dictionaries define a job seeker as a person who is unemployed and looking for work and a jobseeker as someone who is trying to find a job. Is the unemployment factor important here? Does the ...
Milena Kotelba's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
19 views

Uses of selected candidate or candidate selected

The selected candidates are or candidates selected are? I was reading one article and i came across the candidates selected are .... So Which one is correct ? Is there any differences?
wasbo's user avatar
  • 1
-1 votes
1 answer
53 views

"Not clear", "not precise", "not accurate", "not exact" — Which of them is it possible to use when a photo or contours are vague?

I'd like to understand the difference between "clear", "precise", "accurate" and "exact", when we're talking about a vague image. A blurred photo of a town: (...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
37 views

Does "being in despair" imply more severity than being desperate?

Or, do the two words- depair and desperate convey the same feeling
megamonster68's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

Are "All right, so ....." and "So, yeah, ....." interchangeable when we start to talk about a subject?

"So yeah,...." "All right, so..." I sometimes hear these two expressions being used when people start talking about something to other people. For example, I hear that some ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,329
0 votes
1 answer
109 views

What's the difference between "for" &"by" in the sentence —"Can you do it for(by) tomorrow?"?

Can you do it for tomorrow? Vs Can you do it by tomorrow? Can you do it for tomorrow? —From Collins dictionary Why I should choose "for" in place of "by"??
Sam's user avatar
  • 1,925
12 votes
4 answers
2k views

"This might occur when a male and female horse see each other." — Why is it correct to use the singular "horse" with the plural "see" here?

an excerpt from the book "Walking the Way of the Horse", page 111: ... horses can use their front legs and hooves to strike at other horses. This might occur when two horses meet for the ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
37 views

If "I did Exercise 1 but not 2" is correct, then why is "The exercise I did was 1 but not 2" not correct?

a conclusion from one of threads on forum.wordreference.com: (1a) I did Exercise 1, not 2. — correct (1b) I did Exercise 1 but not 2. — correct (2a) The exercise I did was 1, not 2. — correct (2b) ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
38 views

The rides are dangerous to the teenagers {to play/playing} there

The rides are dangerous to the teenagers to play there. The rides are dangerous to the teenagers playing there. Are both acceptable expressions? Is there any difference in meaning between the two ...
TUALL's user avatar
  • 403
1 vote
2 answers
85 views

What difference is between playing with someone and playing someone?

Played myself in scrabble. I won! What is the difference between playing with someone and playing someone? What if someone is replaced with the speaker themselves? Is the sentence in the quote ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 3,605
0 votes
2 answers
59 views

difference between "as" and "with"

Could anyone please explain to me if there's any difference between the two sentences in meaning and style? As 2024 begins, will you support us? With 2024 beginning, will you support us? Thanks a ...
Erika123's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

"Come on, anyone/someone, join me up here on the stage." – What's the difference between "anyone" and "someone" here?

a sentence from the textbook "the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language", page 382: (1) Come on, anyone, join me up here on the stage. my variant: (2) Come on, someone, join me up here ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,282
4 votes
1 answer
412 views

What is the difference between "He got himself injured" and "He got injured"?

wordreference.com: (1) He got himself injured. (1) doesn't have a word-for-word translation into my home language. Could you tell me please what exactly (1) means? To better understand (1), I want to ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,282
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

After a/the trial that

I came across the following excerpt in a book about Hitler. Before reading this sentence, the reader had been already informed about the trial that Hitler had faced. Why is, then, this trial referred ...
Penguin422's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
49 views

Distinguishing Between 'Periodically' and 'Sporadically': Usage and Differences [closed]

I've encountered some confusion while trying to differentiate between the terms "periodically" and "sporadically." Both seem to relate to the frequency of events, but I'm unsure ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
27 views

When to use "was" in past tense?

I noticed that people sometimes use "was" in the past tense where the sentence would also make sense without it. For example, "The paperweight was preventing the documents from blowing ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
58 views

Understanding the Distinction Between 'Goal' and 'Target' in English

As a non-native English speaker, I often encounter the words 'goal' and 'target'. While they appear to be used interchangeably in some contexts, I suspect there might be subtle differences in their ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar

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