Questions tagged [difference]

This tag is for questions about the difference in meaning between certain phrases or sentences.

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26 views

About the exact meaning of “I'll scratch your back, if you scratch mine”

On google I have found that the motto "I'll scratch your back, if you scratch mine" means that "I'll help you, if you help me" or "to describe the way that one person helps another because they ...
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1answer
40 views

Is my nationality Dutch or Netherlands?

I'm from the Netherlands. English has taught me to say "I'm Dutch". But through many travels I've noticed that non-native English speakers confuse this with "Deutsch", which is German for, well, ...
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19 views

What's the difference between “disparage” and “denigrate”?

I met the two words in this article: Long-term memory is sometimes disparaged. It's common for people to denigrate “rote memory”, especially in the classroom. Two explanations I got on the web: I ...
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1answer
30 views

“I am going to lecture room” and “I am going for lecture room”?

What is the difference between: "I am going to lecture room" and "I am going for lecture room"? Which one is preferable?
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3answers
38 views

Difference between “deliver” and “send”

In the (7) blank the answer is " Deliver " but can we use " Send " instead?
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1answer
26 views

Wake up & Woke up

What's the different between 'wake up' & 'woke up'? Which grammar part used in it? & How can I understand this type of word? Which means different situation?
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29 views

problem with continuous

I can't understand why it's present continuous in this sentence: I never call my friends if I'm driving a car Why we can't just say - if I drive a car? what's the difference?
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2answers
23 views

“Carefully” vs “Cautiously”

Teacher) She ignores what I ask her through the class and often talks to other students when I'm teaching and distracts me. I have warned her several times so far, but she always overlooks my ...
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17 views

“Comprehend” or “Understand”

Please have a look on the definition below: That is, both words mean "grasp the meaning of," but in some cases understand stresses the final result, while comprehend stresses the process of getting ...
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20 views

Much vs a lot of [Why not to use much in positive sentences?]

I would like to know a few things about the use of "much" and "a lot of" in positive sentences. First of all, I have been taught that in positive sentences I have to use "a lot of" and not "much". ...
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0answers
24 views

Is it grammatically correct, especially with tenses?

Is the sentence below grammatically correct, if not, what's wrong here? (I meant to say that first goes concert and after that - marching). Concert begins at the parish church of city, followed by ...
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1answer
25 views

To coil or fold or cause to coil or fold

TheFreeDictionary says about "convolute": intr. & tr.v. To coil or fold or cause to coil or fold in overlapping whorls. You can see that article here - convolute Can you explain to me why ...
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4answers
2k views

“electricity was suddenly turned off” or “electricity suddenly turned off”

Randall has been writing his paper when the electricity suddenly turned off The difference between "was turned off" and "turned off" Can I use present perfect progressive has been if "the electricity ...
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1answer
23 views

“half as fast” vs “twice as fast”

Are these two meanings equivalent? "half as fast" vs "twice as fast" Ex: Reaction A is half as fast as Reaction B. Reaction A is twice as fast as Reaction B. This is from my Chemistry textbook ...
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1answer
24 views

“He didn’t drive the car into his garage even once”

Should I change the sentence “He didn’t drive the car into his garage even once” into “He has not been able to get his own car into his garage even once”?
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0answers
31 views

Why “a means to” not “a mean to” nor “means to”?

He turned to substance abuse as a means to cope. Is this something ungrammatical-but-they-use-it-everyday? Why don't they normally say like "as a mean to cope" nor "as means to cope"?
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2answers
37 views

What is the difference between “in the day”, “on the day” and “during the day” in context?

Tell me please the difference between the following sentences. February 11 was really hectic, so I had to do a ton on the day. February 11 was really hectic, so I had to do a ton in the day. ...
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0answers
23 views

When should I use Present Simple or Present Continuous?

I'm doing my best in distinguishing between the meaning of the Present Simple form and the meaning of the Present Continuous form. Every day I read some texts and highlight the extracts consisting ...
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12 views

Difference between “well known to” and “well known among”

1.This asset management company is well known among investors. 2.This asset management company is well known to investors. What is the semantic difference between No.1 and No.2?
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19 views

Phrasal verb - stamp something out (words' position)

I have read this, and I read "and stamping out an epidemic that has killed more than 1,000 people and infected more than 40,000." So, from Cambridge Dictionary I get: stamp something out — ...
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0answers
23 views

Is the any difference in meaning between “ask someone for something” and “ask something from someone”?

Do ask someone for something and *ask something from someone mean exactly? For example: My friend asked me for a phone. My friend asked a phone from me.
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1answer
39 views

What is the difference in meaning between “I eat twice a day” and “I eat twice in a day”?

Tell me please the difference in meaning between the following sentenced? I eat twice a day. I eat twice in a day. I am sure that in a day is a valid phrase, but I cannot figure out the ...
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1answer
39 views

what are the differences between the verb: “flick” and “flip”?

flick 1-[transitive] flick something + adv./prep. to hit something lightly with a sudden quick movement, especially using your finger and thumb together, or your hand She flicked the dust ...
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1answer
18 views

What is the difference between “if” and “as soon as”?

What is the difference between "if" and "as soon as"? Example: "I will come if I can" and "I will come as soon as I can" Is it both correct?
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0answers
24 views

“documents you sent me” or “documents that you have sent me”

Which is the correct sentence? I filled out the documents you sent me. OR I filled out the documents that you have sent me. Could somebody explain me why first or second sentence is correct?
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0answers
27 views

Difference between social networks and social media?

What is the difference between "social networks" and "social media"? I often see these two terms used, and I can't figure out when to use one or the other. I also wanted to know if the natives could ...
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0answers
20 views

difference between “English group of students” and “students' English Group”

A group of students in my college is starting an English group and they are suggesting the following names: "English department of students" "English group of students" "English association of ...
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18 views

What is the difference between 'a few', 'some', 'several', and 'multiple'?

'A few', 'some', 'several', 'multiple' seem to have, more or less, the same meaning. But, as I see it, 'a few' appears to be less than 'some' and 'several' while 'some' and 'several', in turn, appear ...
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0answers
18 views

Trouble with gerund and infinitive

I’m having a little trouble with the use of the infinitive and gerund. It would be nice if you could tell me if I interpreted the following sentences correctly or not. I saw him crossing the street. ...
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1answer
38 views

Is it better to say “This feature allows you to…” or “This feature lets you…”?

In the context of a web application, is it better to say: "This feature allows you to (do something/action)." or "This feature lets you (do something/action)."?
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1answer
37 views

Is there any difference in meaning between “dry” and “dry off”?

Is there any difference between dry and *dry off? For example: Let the fruit dry (off) before eating. I cannot see any difference, but I am very curious to know what would make native English ...
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0answers
25 views

What is the difference between “guess an answer”, “guess at an answer” and “guess an answer right”?

Tell me please the difference between the following sentences. I guessed one answer in the exam. I guessed one answer right in the exam. I guessed at one answer in the exam. Can the ...
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0answers
28 views

What is the difference between “what is going on with you” and “what is going on for you”?

What is the difference between go on with someone and go on for someone. For example: You are so pale! What is going on with/for you. I though that the correct preposition was with when used with ...
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20 views

Bring it, please! VS. Bring it please!

This one looks simple, but I struggle to figure out which one is grammatically correct, or is there a difference in meaning?
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1answer
19 views

Is fair-to-middling better than middling?

middling [...] 1.1 Neither very good nor very bad. (from here) fair-to-middling Slightly above average. (from here) Lexico didn't help me, though it kinda suggests that 'middling' ...
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31 views

The difference between “last year” and “the last year” in context

Tell me please what is the difference in meaning between the following sentences. Last year was tough, but somehow we managed to pull through it. The last year was tough, but somehow we ...
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1answer
23 views

Is there any difference between “this night”, “last night” and “this past night”?

Is there any difference between this night, last night and this past night? For example: I didn't sleep well last night. I didn't sleep well this night. I didn't sleep well this past ...
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1answer
25 views

What are the differences between “a sip” and “a mouthful”?

mouthful [countable] an amount of food or drink that you put in your mouth at one time She took a mouthful of water. Thank you, but I couldn’t eat another mouthful. He talked eagerly ...
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20 views

Notation vs syntax

If I talk about programming language I will use a word "syntax"(and/or "grammar"). If I am looking for "smaller" things like "how to write very large numbers" I will use a word "notation" as in "...
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26 views

What is the difference between “go by a store” and “go past a store”?

Tell me please if there is any difference between by and past in the following context. I went by the store on the way home. I went past the store on the way home.
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1answer
24 views

The difference between “follow-up” and “next” in context

Tell me please if there is any difference between the following sentences? I can't go for a break as I have to prepare the classroom for the follow-up students. I can't go for a break as I ...
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1answer
46 views

What is the difference between “Fly in a city” and “Fly to a city”?

What is the difference between fly in and fly to when talking about planes going somewhere? For example: The plain has just flown in New-York. The plain has just flown to New-York. I have ...
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1answer
17 views

“by” or “by using” or “using”?

Are these three sentences all correct and have the same meaning? 1) This quantity can be calculated by using equation (1). 2) This quantity can be calculated by equation (1). 3) This ...
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1answer
17 views

“Finish work” or “finish my work”?

Tell me please if there any difference in meaning between the following sentences? Yesterday I finished my work at 6. Yesterday I finished work at 6. If there is no difference, then is it ...
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0answers
21 views

What is the difference between as and while here? [duplicate]

Is there a difference between as and while in the sentence below? Which one of them is the more natural choice to Americans? Is one of them more formal than the other? James waits as/while April ...
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0answers
41 views

Are these sentences basically the same?

1) That's why I'd (I would) just let you know that I'm single. 2) That's why I just wanted to let you know that I'm single. Are these sentences basically the same?
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1answer
24 views

Is there a difference between “wear something to work” and “wear something at work”?

Is there a difference between wear something to work and wear something at work? For example: The boss always wear a black suit to/at work. If there is no real difference in meaning, then which ...
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1answer
28 views

“Hamdi is very fast I think he will win the match”

What is the difference between Hamdi is very fast I think he will win the match and Hamdi is running fast, I think he is going to win the race is that only running and very fast or this is not ...
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0answers
15 views

“Tone” VS “Intonation”

I was wondering if someone is saying hateful things about someone else, (including their mimic when they are talking using particular, unpleasant words and a specific undesirable ups and downs of ...
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26 views

what are the difference among photograph, photo, picture, image, drawing and sketch?

obviously the following image (img_1) is NOT a photo. while the following image (img_2) seems to be a photo. similarly, photograph, photo, picture, image, drawing and sketch would be used somewhere. ...

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