Questions tagged [difference]

This tag is for questions about the difference in meaning between certain phrases or sentences.

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1answer
3 views

“Meet” VS “Live up to”

I was wondering which choice is the correct one here and why? The movie didn't ............ my expectations. [connotation: the movie was not that satisfactory that I expected that to be.] a. meet b....
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1answer
578 views

‘I wish it to be clearly understood’ Vs. 'I wish it is clearly understood'?

What is the difference between ‘I wish it to be clearly understood’ and 'I wish it is clearly understood'? The second sentence was taken from Oxford dictionary - 2.1, and it is not clear to ...
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1answer
21 views

cash vs hard cash

I have just read the following headline: Google wants you to complete simple tasks for hard cash in its new app. According to the Cambridge dictionary, "hard cash" means "money in the ...
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2answers
43k views

The use of “work with” vs. “work at/on”

In one of my previous questions, Tiercelet left a comment: It's a pleasure to work with such well-thought-out and nuanced questions! It seems work with has a similar meaning to work on or work ...
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2answers
394 views

The weight of a word

Can someone please direct me to sources, systems, or a way of measuring the weight or substance a word holds. Its synonymous value. Also without considering sentencing, just general. Although the sub ...
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2answers
37 views

What is the difference between 'because of' and 'for'?

I cant tell when i should use them or if they are interchangeable Examples I don't eat meat (for/because of) various reasons Scotland is famous (for/because of) its spectacular countryside
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2answers
75 views

Difference between “seeks to promote” and “promote”

What is the difference between the sentence "UN seeks to promote international peace" and "UN promotes international peace"? I think that in the first sentence, it's stated more like an objective of ...
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1answer
19 views

The difference between 'It is important that…' and 'It is important for…to…'

Is there any difference between the following sentences (in its meaning)? It is important for him to study in the UK. It is important that he studies in the UK. I also wonder if there is any ...
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1answer
18 views

(Keep / Stay / Be) in touch

I was wondering which option below works in my example: They moved away a couple of years ago, but............ with each other. a. we're still in touch b. we still keep in touch c. we still stay ...
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6answers
81k views

What is the difference between “Thanks much” and “Thanks a lot”?

A: Can you give me a pen? B: Yes, take it. A: Thanks much OR Thanks a lot Is there any difference between these two phrases? Which one is preferred to use?
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4answers
1k views

Difference between which and what

Usually people say, "Which is your favourite show?" and "Which color is this?" But some people also say, "What is your favourite show?" and, "What color is this?" Can you tell me what is the usage ...
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1answer
412 views

What is the difference between “compound noun” and “noun noun phrase”?

I read: The collocation is a sequence or juxtaposition of words or terms that usually co-occur / go together in a sentence. For example, you make the bed, but you do your homework. Example : 1) ...
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0answers
21 views

What is the correct option?

I think they mean the same but i also think that one is grammatically wrong She wanted to be treated like her brother She wants to have been treated like her brother Is any of the options wrong? Do ...
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1answer
29 views

Is there a difference between 'a small smile' and 'a little smile'?

I was really angry but managed a small/little smile. Is there any difference between a small smile and a little smile?
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1answer
16 views

(Noticeable / Considerable / Eye-catching) progress

I am looking for an English fixed collocation for a kind of progress which is so significant and outstanding that is distinct compared to other achievements. I am well aware that there are so many ...
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3answers
1k views

Difference between verdict and conviction

According to my dictionary: verdict an official decision made in a court of law, especially about whether someone is guilty of a crime or how a death happened conviction  a decision in a ...
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0answers
22 views

“It's believed that he (has painted/painted) the portrait”

"The portrait is believed to have been painted by him" I changed the sentence and made it like this: "It's believed that he (has painted/painted) the portrait" I'm not sure ...
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0answers
14 views

Charge someone with something (figurative usage)

According to the dictionary definition, "charging someone with something" means to make a formal statement saying that someone is accused of a crime: She's been charged with murder. But I ...
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0answers
22 views

What is the difference between reason, conclude, deduce and infer? [closed]

I have tried to compare the meanings of these words to each other by using www.learnersdictionary.com but I ended up being puzzled. https://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/deduce https://www....
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2answers
24 views

Come over here/Get over here

Come over here. Get over here. Do these mean the exact same with the only difference being that the second one sounds a little more like an order?
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1answer
25 views

The car bounced/bumped over something

He was about to take a sip of his coffee when suddenly his car bounced/bumped over something. Could anyone please tell me the difference between "bounced" and "bumped" here? Are ...
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1answer
20 views

Danger, jeopardy, hazard. What's the difference?

I've looked through a number of discussions on the internet about this question, but still don't get it. Looks like they are almost total synonyms. But I'm confused by the fact that "jeopardy&...
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1answer
46 views

This and that difference

Are this and that both used to refer the thing/person/situation just mentioned or not?please help me in this or that. E.g, Two persons are talking about a man. That/this man is not on the spot. The ...
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1answer
38k views

There is no any & There is no

I did a search for there is no any on Google (books, Ngrams). So I think the wording there is no any is grammatical. But I can't see a difference, if any, between two phrases indicated in the title. ...
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0answers
13 views

“Background” VS “Record”

Could anyone please let me know whether in the following example we can substitute "records" for "background" without any change in meaning in idiomatic English: I had a job ...
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1answer
394 views

'I am looking for a baby' vs 'I am trying for a baby'

I am non native English speaker and was being convinced by someone today that "I am looking for a baby" means the same as "I am trying for a baby" Is that correct English?
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1answer
18 views

Is there a difference between “can't” or “couldn't”?

He spoke so quickly that I can't understand him at all. He spoke so quickly that I couldn't understand him at all. What is more correct?
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1answer
18 views

“The others” vs “The rest”

I was wondering which choice below sounds idiomatic here. He's in a different class from .......... at the school. a. the rest b. the others I am quite sure we can say: There are twenty students ...
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1answer
29 views

“Pack” vs “Bunch”

I know that "pack" is reserved for some socially unacceptable stuff like theft etc. Also, a bunch is a group of things that are connected 'a bunch of grapes'. A pack is a group of things ...
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1answer
28 views

“Quit” VS “Give up”

As you are aware, the verbs "quit" and "give up" have quite similar meanings and are often used interchangeably in the sense of stopping doing something: I gave up / quit smoking. ...
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2answers
494 views

What is the difference between “high-pitched” and “high-pitch”

I have noticed many compound adjectives with an "ed" ending, such as "snowed-under" or "three-legged". It looks a bit weird since I have also saw words like "high-price" and "high-quality" in some ...
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1answer
47 views

“I was stupid to followed her advice”

1: I was stupid to followed her advice 2: I was stupid that I followed her advice 3: I was stupid to have followed her advice 4: I was stupid that I had followed her advice Do these 4 sentences mean ...
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1answer
30 views

Is there any difference in meaning between the phrase “take someone's word for it” and “take someone at their word”?

Could you tell me if there is any difference in meaning and usage between the phrase take someone's word for it and take someone at their word? For example: Sara told me that she would keep her ...
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1answer
26 views

Native speaker vs. Mother tongue speaker meaning

Native speaker vs. Mother tongue speaker meaning What are the differences between these two expression?
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1answer
51 views

“such a lot of friends”

What's up with that phrase "such a lot of friends", "such a lot of money" etc First of all, I've never heard it before, not in 30 years. Second of all, why isn't it "so a lot of friends" (sounds ...
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0answers
20 views

Grab or pick up?

Gaming on consoles is more convenient than computers. You can just pick up/grab your controller and start playing right away. Can you grab/pick up some chips from the grocery store? Do 'grab' and '...
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1answer
16 views

Difference between '[Adjective] as it may sound' and 'As [adjective] as it may sound'?

Is there much difference between the two? For example: Silly as it may sound, ... As silly as it may sound, ... Also: When you say it like the second example, does the second 'as' still mean '(even)...
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2answers
31 views

“Suspect someone” VS “Be suspicious of someone”

I was wondering whether the words "suspect" as a transitive verbs and the phrasal verb "be suspicious of..." mean the same or not. Example: 1- No one knows who killed her, but ...
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2answers
782 views

Difference between “morals” and “morality ”

Morals [plural] : proper ideas and beliefs about how to behave in a way that is considered right and good by most people http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/moral Morality: ...
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5answers
23k views

difference between put your hand up and raise your hand?

If I asked my teacher a question in a classroom, then which one of the following sentence would be correct ? I put my hand up to ask the teacher a question. I raised my hand up to ask the teacher a ...
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1answer
29 views

When should we use “how about x(something\someone )” and when should we use “what about x”?

For example, when someone says "how are you", which one is better to answer? I'm fine. What about you? I'm fine. How about you?
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4answers
8k views

Foundations vs. Fundamentals vs. Basics

Suppose there are three books Foundations of Machine Learning Fundamentals of Machine Learning Machine Learning Basics or Basics of Machine Learning What are the difference. I think basics means ...
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2answers
11k views

how to discernin between “cause” and “ reason”?

I know somehow the word reason deals with justification explanation, and cause. In other words, although the word reason, considering the text, could mean each of the bold ones, I am wondering what ...
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1answer
771 views

'research into' vs 'research on'

I'm working on a book called 'Academic Vocabulary in Use' published by Cambridge University Press. There's a lesson suggesting some nouns commonly associated with particular prepositions. Research is ...
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2answers
37 views

Particular question about past

He knew that I was trying to tell him the fact that him being wrong. He knew that I was trying to tell him the fact which is him being wrong. He knew that I was trying to tell him the fact ...
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2answers
41 views

Difference between for and to

For and to are both confusing preposition in English.As I know we use to with moving verbs and for with stative verb. For example, give a pen to ayesha. This pen is for Ayesha. But It's like a dream ...
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1answer
90 views

What is the difference between “Fly in a city” and “Fly to a city”?

What is the difference between fly in and fly to when talking about planes going somewhere? For example: The plain has just flown in New-York. The plain has just flown to New-York. I have ...
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1answer
17 views

Can the word consider be used in this context?

This question is very much preferably to be answered by native English speakers I've been looking through some text written by Russian native speaker. And I've encountered this phrase: "Why don’t ...
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1answer
77 views

“Environment” VS “Milieu”

I see no difference between "environment" and "milieu" in the following example: It is a study of the social and cultural milieu in which Michelangelo lived and worked. [Source] I think, we ...

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