Questions tagged [difference]

This tag is for questions about the difference in meaning between certain phrases or sentences.

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30
votes
4answers
12k views

What is the difference between can and could in 'Can/could you please explain this to me?'

Can you please explain this to me? Could you please explain this to me? I am unable to figure out which to use which situation. I did google, and some posts say they are both the same, even if ...
12
votes
7answers
1k views

“waterway … flowed sombre” - Should Joseph Conrad have used an adverb, not an adjective?

SPOILER ALERT: This question asks about the last line of Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad. If you are reading the novel, you may want to skip this question. Should an adverb (i.e. sombrely) have ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

“I have sent it to X too” vs. “I have sent it to X also”

I have sent this e-mail to Aman also. I have sent this e-mail to Aman too. Which one is correct? What is the exact difference between the two? Please explain.
23
votes
6answers
105k views

Difference between “in time” and “on time”

I have an appointment at 8 and I arrive there at 7:55, is it "on time" or "in time"? What about "the nick of time"?
27
votes
2answers
1k views

Dates and times: “on”, “in”, “at”?

I’m often confused when I speak about times and dates. What is the rule for using on, in, and at in the following sentences? I will do it ___ Tuesday. We married ___ March. He returned ___ the same ...
67
votes
6answers
7k views

(In, On or At) GitHub?

What's the difference between say: "The project will be on GitHub", "The project will be in GitHub" and "The project will be at GitHub"?
58
votes
12answers
8k views

Difference between “illegal” and “very illegal”

From my understanding of English, "very" means "more than the usual" or "to a higher extent". I've seen on several places the expression "very illegal", such as here as an example: https://youtu.be/...
13
votes
3answers
2k views

Difference between “this” and “that”

I always use them reversibly since I'm not too sure about their differences. For instance, in an email I just wrote: solution 1 solution 2 Which one of those solutions do you prefer? ...
97
votes
7answers
135k views

Is there any difference between being ill and sick?

I can say I'm ill or I'm sick. But what is the difference between the usage of these terms? I've heard that one can use sick for longer-term and ill for shorter-term, but is that really correct? How ...
10
votes
2answers
77k views

“Have been doing” and “have done”

What's the difference between I have been playing tennis for five years. and I have played tennis for five years. Are they grammatically correct? If yes, how are they different in meaning/...
30
votes
9answers
651k views

What is the difference between “me neither” and “me either”?

I want to know the difference between "me neither" and "me either", are both correct?
23
votes
2answers
243k views

Working in / for / at?

Which is the correct way to tell where I'm working? I'm working in XYZ company. I'm working for XYZ company. I'm working at XYZ company. Or is there any difference in the meaning?
21
votes
1answer
25k views

What is the difference between “look”, “see”, and “watch”?

When should I use "look", "see", and "watch"? I'm watching "Star Trek". Have you seen "Star Trek"? Are the examples above correct?
8
votes
6answers
58k views

Difference between “hundred”, “a hundred”, and “one hundred”?

What is the difference between hundred, a hundred and one hundred? Which one is correct? The book has hundred pages. The book has a hundred pages. The book has one hundred pages. I think ...
9
votes
4answers
19k views

What's the difference between “I love singing” and “I love to sing”?

I would like to know what the difference is between "I love doing something" and "I love to do something". For example: “I love singing.” and, “I love to sing.” When I was young, ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

'Would' vs 'should', expressing expectation on the part of the speaker

Page 111 (77, Should expressing probability), Oxford Learner's Grammar - Grammar Finder: We can also use should to say that something is probable, either in the present or the future. ...
4
votes
1answer
655 views

What's the difference between “has been living” and “has lived”?

Here I know I have one present perfect and present perfect continuous sentence. I have lived in Europe for 2 years. I have been living in Europe for 2 years. Can you use both of them interchangeably?...
11
votes
2answers
3k views

Difference between “should” and “must”

What is the difference between "should" and "must"? e.g. "They should have called the police." Can I use "must" in that sentence or not? e.g. "You should read his new book." How about this sentence?
6
votes
1answer
4k views

Correct usage of will and would

Consider the following sentence It will/would rain tomorrow. I understand "would" usually means something that is really improbable. So "it would happen" means it might happen but it is very ...
8
votes
3answers
6k views

What's the difference between “in winter” and “in the winter”?

Reading an old XKCD comic I found this sentence (you must hover the mouse over the picture to see it): There are probably children out there holding down spacebar to stay warm in the winter! I've ...
35
votes
7answers
11k views

Why is 'The Chinese have invented the printer' wrong?

In the textbook by by Raymond Murphy, Intermediate English Grammar, 2nd edition, on page 26: "The Chinese invented printing." Raymond Murphy says that we can't use the present perfect here. ...
24
votes
4answers
19k views

what is the difference between “yet” and “still”?

what is the difference between "yet" and "still"? When we can use "still"? and when we can use "yet"? Are they synonyms or not? "The plan could yet succeed." Can I use "still" in that sentence ...
25
votes
3answers
3k views

What are the differences between “to talk” and “to speak”?

Both verbs "to talk" and "to speak" refer to the same action. Is their meaning exactly the same? When is more appropriate to use one, or the other verb?
6
votes
3answers
498 views

What is the difference between “say” and “tell”?

I really get confused when to use say and when to use tell. Which is appropriate in the following: What did he tell? / What did he say? What are you saying? / What are you telling?
15
votes
3answers
13k views

What is the difference between “gerund” and “infinitive”?

What is the difference between "gerund" and "infinitive"? I do not understand the differences.Can you explain them?
10
votes
3answers
1k views

When to use “of”, “in” and “at”?

I never know how to use prepositions like of, in or at. What's the rules for each one of then? My last doubt was about this sentence: Order of importance Order in importance Order at importance ...
5
votes
4answers
38k views

Difference between be and become

I am not good at English. And I used to say that I want to become a software developer. But Some people are using that I want to be a [something]. Which one is correct? And at what situations we ...
4
votes
3answers
60k views

“done” vs “have done”

I think this sentence is correct. I done something. This is also correct. I have done something. What are the involved tense? How are they different?
3
votes
1answer
239 views

Using “of” or apostrophe, which is more common?

Sometimes when I write, for example, "the boundaries of segments", I am suggested to use "segments' boundaries" or even "segment boundaries". Or "the page's content" vs. "the content of the page" vs....
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Don’t seem too forward / Don’t seem overly friendly [closed]

Let’s suppose someone is behaving in a very impolite and perhaps rude way with you and you dislike his manners toward yourself. In such a condition, do the following sentences mean the same and can ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

What is the difference between “why are you worried” and “why you are worried”? [closed]

What is the difference between these two sentences? Why are you worried? Why you are worried? Which one is correct?
17
votes
7answers
55k views

Difference between “little”, “few”, “a little” and “a few”

What are the differences among “little”, “few”, “a little” and “a few”? Are “little” and “few” synonyms?
20
votes
7answers
38k views

“I have little money” vs. “I have a little money”

What is the difference between “I have little money” and “I have a little money”? Are they the same?
11
votes
3answers
44k views

'Thank you for taking your time writing' or 'Thank you for taking your time to write' ?

A person gave me an answer on English.SE and I commented: Thank you for taking your time writing this wonderful answer! Now, looking at the sentence in retrospect, even though I am not a native ...
9
votes
5answers
124k views

Difference between “much, many, a lot of and lots of”

Difference between "much, many, a lot of and lots of" What is the difference between them? Are they synonyms or not?
17
votes
3answers
70k views

“I am hurting” in the meaning of “I am hurt”? Why?

Once in a while I hear someone use the phrase I am hurting. It appears to mean I am hurt, not I am hurting you. For example, consider the text on this drawing: When and why is it correct to say I'm ...
10
votes
2answers
5k views

When to use “I” and “me” in an answer

I still have problems to figure out when it's right to use I or me in an answer. For example, what is the right answer to "Who did this?" If I did it, should I say I or me? I've heard native ...
8
votes
1answer
8k views

“to be” vs. “being” after adjective (and why)

Which sentence is correct, and why? 1) It's awesome being by the water. 2) It's awesome to be by the water.
6
votes
6answers
162k views

What is the difference between a company, organisation, industry, firm, corporation and business?

A company is any form of business whether it is small or large. Generally the term "company" indicates a particular kind of business dealing in a specific product. An organisation is the ...
6
votes
1answer
14k views

“It is raining” or “it is rainy”?

I'm trying to say: I don't like the weather today because it is ____. (rainy / raining) I have to carry an umbrella for ____ (rainy / raining) weather. Should I use rainy or raining? Also, what ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

'reason' vs 'reason that'

The complementiser that is the first word in a complement of a noun♦. When can it be omitted? Do 1 and 2 below differ? I am asking in general, but I exemplify with Prof John Lawler's examples ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Shoot, Shoot At

I have a question about the difference between the verb "shoot" and "shoot at": Police shot the suspect. Police shot at the suspect. Are they just the same?
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Does the position of “only” give a different meaning to the sentence? [duplicate]

I've only been there once. (OALD) Does this mean ‘I’ve just been there not doing particular activities like studying or staying for particular something else, and I have once? (Because ‘only’ is put ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

3 sentences with “only” [duplicate]

I only play tennis in the summer. I play tennis only in the summer. I play tennis in the summer only. It there any difference in these 3 sentences?
2
votes
1answer
483 views

Difference between the use of “a” and “any” in these examples?

I didn't have an idea. I did not have any idea. I am much more familiar with the second one. The first one sounds a bit odd to me, but sounds fine if I say: I did not have even an idea. But, ...
1
vote
3answers
931 views

What is the difference between 'east Indian' and 'eastern Indian'?

I read the following line in NYT: A surging crowd near a Hindu temple killed at least ten people and injured 25 others in the eastern Indian state of Jharkhand on Monday, police said. Now, my ...
30
votes
2answers
133k views

What is the difference between “wait” and “await”?

I'd like to know the difference between the two verbs since they seem to have the same meaning. When should I use await, and when wait?
9
votes
2answers
83k views

What is the difference between “I was there” and “I have been there”?

In our language, the difference between the two sentences is very vague. What is the difference between "I was there" and "I have been there"?
18
votes
4answers
62k views

What is the difference between 'hear' and 'listen'?

Is there a difference between 'hear' and 'listen' in Standard English?
19
votes
5answers
125k views

“Furthermore” versus “moreover”

Is there any difference in meaning between furthermore, and moreover? In other words, can I easily replace these words with one another in any sentence, or should I do it carefully?